Buy Used
£0.80
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Only lightly used. Book has minimal wear to cover and binding. A few pages may have small creases and minimal underlining. Book selection as BIG as Texas.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Fencing Master Hardcover – 1 May 1999

4.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, 1 May 1999
£0.80
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 245 pages
  • Publisher: Harcourt; First Printing edition (May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0151001812
  • ISBN-13: 978-0151001811
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16 x 3.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,117,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Described as a "master of the intellectual thriller", Arturo Perez-Reverte has established himself as a major figure in European fiction. The English translation of The Fencing Master, first published in Spanish in 1988, follows the critical success of The Flanders Panel and The Dumas Club.

Contemplative, skilful, and--in a quiet way--melancholy, The Fencing Master is a foray into historical fiction: Perez-Reverte draws his figures against the background of a Madrid sweltering on the eve of Spain's September Revolution in 1868. Each of its eight chapters begins with an epigraph to the art which emerges as a way of interpreting the world through this novel: fencing. Jaime Astarloa, the master, has made fencing his life and legacy, and it's through his eyes--the eyes of a man who wants to resist the vulgar progress of 19th-century politics and passions--that the mystery, and tragedy, of the book unfold. It begins with a woman who wants to learn fencing--"At that moment, someone knocked at the door, and nothing would ever again be the same in the fencing master's life"--a woman who draws Astarloa into a world of political and erotic intrigue which will test his art to the limit.--Vicky Lebeau -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

Review

"You will want to reach the book's nearly perfect ending in a single sitting" (Time Out)

"The author is in the best sense a romantic and to read him is to rediscover the delights of Dumas and Conan Doyle" (Amanda Craig The Times)

"As assured and elegant as Don Jaime's sword thrusts" (Stephanie Merritt Observer) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was Perez-Reverte's first historic novel, featuring a 50-something traditionalist fencing master who ends up getting sucked into an awful scheme by the cunning & evil femme fatale of the story, Adela de Otero, who is pretty adept at handling the foil herself. Set against the feverish background of Madrid in 1868 just prior to the revolution that ended the inglorious reign of Isabella II. Good stuff!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
OK. Firstly, I read very little historical fiction. Secondly, I read very little which was not written in English. No reason why not, but that's how it is. Thirdly, I know nothing about fencing.
But I enjoyed this book immensely.
I bought it (from a normal bookshop, I confess) because I liked the cover and was interested in the first few pages. It's short, and usually I prefer longer books - it can give the author more time to explore their characters, but this is short and perfectly formed.
Don Jaime, the fencing master, is getting older and sees his living starting to dry up as swords and the art of fencing are replaced by more 'modern' weapons and pursuits. He uses fencing, and his pursuit of the perfect, unstoppable thrust to give his life form and context, ever unchanging against the background of turmoil engulfing Spain.
His life is turned upside down when a woman, beautiful and mysterious, persuades him to take her on as a student. He slowly finds himself falling in love with her, and his life is thrown into turmoil.
One the one hand, this is a thriller, plain and simple. Refined and elegant, but a thriller nonetheless. On the other, it is a study of a man entering old age unable to cope with the changes going on around him, and trying to cling onto the past - for that reason alone it will endure.
The only complaint I had about it is that the fencing terminology (of which there is much, as you would expect) is not explained. An appendix containing a glossary or perhaps even some diagrams would be tremendously helpful. I appreciate it's not really the kind of thing that books like this have, but if, like me, your knowledge of fencing is restricted to occasionally seeing it on the Olympics or in Zorro films, then all of the discussions or quatre and terce, foils and sabres is difficult to follow.
That said, it's a minor complaint, and the book is very enjoyable, and surprisingly moving.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 5 May 2000
Format: Paperback
Perez-Reverte's The fencing Master is in part a simple thriller but underneath the story line he develops some interesting themes. Primarily the hero, Don Jaime's inability to adapt as a ageing fencing master during Spain's September Revolution of 1868. A time when the sword was being replaced by ever more realiable rifle and revolvers as the primary weapons of war.
Don Jaime lives in the past and tries to shut himself away from the turmoil occurring around him. His personel quest is to invent the unanswerable sword thrust. Despite his best endeavors Don Jaime is unwittingly pulled ever further into the intrigue occurring around him.
Don Jaime is a man of great passion but with an inability to bring voice to that passion; he is a man of deed and unspoken honour. Alone even with people around him, he is put to the sword by the passion of a dark beautiful women who becomes his pupil. Adela de Otera is young, modern, outward thinking, dark and complex but also a superb fencer.
The author contrasts Don Jaime Astarlo's ideal world where honour is upheld toe to toe with the real world in which a stab in the back is the reality. Jaime Astarlo's world is blown apart, you could view him as a failure through his inability to grasp reality and his naivity or a success in living to his ideals against all odds. Does the Maestro fail or do the people around him fail to match his standards?
The thriller storyline in this book is quite predictable but it is the beauty in which the story is told and the characters portrayed that makes this a great book.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Madrid has always been an atmospheric city for me so overjoyed to have discovered this book that transports you there in the 19th century. The characters are well drawn, the plot is compulsive and the prose is beautiful. You are hooked on the first page because there is a story! Fabulous.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If it changes the way you view yourself, if it makes you yearn to be something more, know more about a subject which was previously uninteresting to you, then I'd say a book is good. "The Fencing Master" did all that to me. Set in the revolutionary times of 19th century Spain, the story revolves around the ageing Maestro, adrift in a world that no longer seems to make sense to him. He lives by his code of honour and according to the rules of his craft, hiding from the changes that occur around him, until a beautiful stranger enters his life and changes it irrevocably. "The Fencing Master" is a book that, even though the intrigue might not be the most original, still manages to get five stars, mainly because of the way it describes the main character, his way of thinking, and, of course, his fencing. Now where can I find a teacher like that for my new hobby...?
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 23 July 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For me 'The Fencing Master' turned out a bit of a disappointment. Despite drawing various parallels between life and the fencing strip the book simply fails to reflect the frenzied intensity of the game.
Apart from that, it's a decent book. It's a detective story set in mid nineteenth century Spain. The main character is a reclusive fencing master in his fifties, who through a mysterious female client becomes embroiled in grizzly political intrigue.
The actual detective plot is a bit unoriginal but aside from that it is quite a touching story about an idealistic and lonely man trying to deal with the onset of old age. I liked the pacing (trotting along steadily most of the time and accelerating with suitable vigour towards the conclusion). The language and the general style of the narrative I found in places a bit wooden and contrived, but not so much as to really put me off.
All in all, I quite enjoyed the book, although I can't say I feel greatly enriched for having read it. My final judgement is: if you like detective stories and/or period drama you'll most likely enjoy 'The Fencing Master', otherwise, it's not really worth the bother.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback