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on 10 October 2013
I read this book during a recent holiday in the Canaries and found it moving, intriguing and hard to put down. The family history - against the backdrop of two world wars and the massive social changes which followed - is a poignant mix of tragedy and incredible triumph over adversity. There are some amazing coincidences and examples of history repeating itself especially with the father and son links to Canada. The power of forgiveness is a theme which is explored and there is an insightful Epilogue written by Richard's son Jack. Highly recommended read and a book that stays in your head long after you've read it.

Maggie Fogarty
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on 8 April 2017
Very interesting reflection of his childhood.
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on 1 May 2017
Down to earth account. Written with emotion and humour.The punishment given seems very harsh and cruel but at the time was the norm.
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on 10 October 2014
Not a bad read a bit confusing in places over all good read
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on 1 October 2014
Very emotional journey and very well written.
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on 20 October 2008
I have been a fan of Richard's TV work for a long time, but i never knew a) what an amazing family history Richard has and b) how well he can write. The book opens with the story of Richard's grandfather when a child, waking up to find he has been abandoned by his whole family, who have moved to Canada to start a new life without him. It's a heartbreaking tale and like so many of the chapters in this book, it almost defies belief. The book is packed with wonderful anecdotes and stories from the past generations of Richard's family all told in that familiar, honest and really engaging way that you expect from Richard. I couldnt put it down and have already recommended to just about everyone i happen to meet!
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 29 October 2008
If you like searing emotion and in your face honesty, then this is the book for you. After watching Mr Madeley on the telly, over the last few years, one is struck, immediately, at how his voice comes to mind as you read this book - a sure sign of its authenticity. Relationships between children and parents are often a never ending war of attrition - with a winner, in many cases, not emerging until one has left the family home. All aspects of family life are included in this heart rending autobiography - some good (his genuine love for Judy's children), some bad (his own upbringing). Whatever the subject, though, Mr Madeley brings it to life in his own trademark fashion. The result is an entertaining and thought provoking read. This is the best book on family life I have read since I finished One Love Two Colours: The unlikely marriage of a Punk Rocker & his African Queen, by Margaret Oshindele - another book that dealt with the barbed subject of family relations, albeit with race playing a part as well. In short, this is a book that should be purchased by anyone in the parenthood 'game'.
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on 13 August 2013
I have always thought of Richard Madeley as a super confident, sometimes arrogant go-getter without a thought for others or care in the world. Having seen him on the BBC "Who do you think you are?" and found that programme fascinating and Richard's reaction to his family history so thoughtful and yes, humble, I decided to read "Fathers and Sons". What a revelation! How history repeated itself not once but twice! How good that Richard has been aware of the failings and inexplicable behaviour of his grandfather and father. How understanding and forgiving he is (as they were) of those failings and has managed to avoid repeating them himself with his stepsons and own son.

Another thing that shone through was the strength of the women in the background, loyal to their man and his, at times, irrational behaviour but quietly supportive of their son (in the case of Richard's grandfather, it was his spinster aunt who gave him love and support).

This book is an insight into the raising of children over the past hundred years, how attitudes to that upbringing has changed, how adversity and ignorance could have destroyed two generations if not three. Thankfully, it did not.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and have no hesitation in recommending it to others.
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on 21 July 2013
I came across this book by accident when searching for Richard & Judy's book club. I read the reviews which are all amazing and sent the sample to my kindle. Once I'd started reading it, I couldn't stop and as Kindle is so quick and easy to get books, I bought it and carried on reading. I really like Richard's style of writing and how he keeps you wanting more.
Well done Richard !
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on 17 August 2013
A brilliant read - I enjoyed every bit of it. Did not expect to as have read a previous Richard Madeley book and did not enjoy at all.
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