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Fatal Philosophy - A Murder Mystery by [Alkek, David S.]
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Fatal Philosophy - A Murder Mystery Kindle Edition

3.2 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

David Alkek is the award winning author of three books, a contemporary mystery set in Dallas, a book of science and philosophy that investigates the purpose of the universe and A Requiem for Athens a work of historical fiction. A dermatologist for over 40 years, David draws from his medical and scientific background to create his books. He is an avid reader and credits Arthur Conan Doyle, John Grisham, James Patterson, and Isaac Asimov for providing his inspiration. In his free time David likes to write, play poker, garden, and attend writer's workshops and book clubs. What David does not enjoy is being bored.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 547 KB
  • Print Length: 394 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008TRIRF6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #887,805 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Aletheuon TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Jun. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In an American university, a professor is working late. Finally, he makes his way to his car in the darkness. Someone steps out from behind a tree and shoots him dead at point blank range, then drives away philosophising to himself that the end justifies the means. Detective Jason Colbert and his partner Mark Davis are assigned to investigate the case. Colbert's many successes have been because he is willing to bend the rules in order to get results - like the murderer, he believes that the end justifies the means.
The action moves to the Dallas Museum of Art where rich, beautiful widow Geneva Caldwell is chairing a fund-raising event. She meets two handsome, rich men - Brock and Grady, who soon become rivals for her affections. They discuss art and the philosophy of Plato, by way of small talk. Dick Karlson and his wife join the discussion and they all agree to meet regularly to continue their discussions. There, Herb and Doris Goodman join them, together with a much younger man, a student called Stuart Langford. Further murders lead Colbert to the philosophy club, where he meets the dying Doris and together, they solve the mystery...
I'm a fan of both murder mysteries and philosophy, so this book seemed right up my street. I must say that it was never boring and I was never tempted to skim passages or miss out chunks. It is true that the kindle version is imperfect, with page number and the author's name appearing at random points in the text, but I did not find it all that distracting. In fact, it is sadly true that many self-published books are pretty badly edited, so that one gets used to it!
I'm not sure whether the things that I did not like were because the author needs to develop his writing skills or simply because he was writing in an alien American style.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pretty dire.

The author has found a copy of Philosophy for Dummies and picked half a dozen philosophers, then bumped off characters who are vaguely something to do with it. The dialogue is clunky, the plot is clunky.

I'm at Murder #4 and seriously wondering whether to bother, because I don't care.

Well, I finished it. I see no reason to change my initial assessment. This is a first draft of a novel by someone who wanted to be published but isn't very practiced at writing for the enjoyment of readers. I'm fairly sure I got this as a freebie - I really hope that I didn't pay money for it. But it isn't a bad first draft - it just needs more time spent on it. Hint - if you want to write dialogue, listen more to people talking.

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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So you decide to write a murder mystery. You research background details, spending hours with your nose buried in philosophy books; you develop characters, become emotionally involved with them. It's more than a book, it's a labour of love...and then after publishing it in Kindle format, you fail to check how it appears when downloaded.

If this was an exiting, thrilling and realistic murder mystery, the issues with page layout would be a minor annoyance. As it is, it makes the clunking dialogue and faux bonhomie - mainly between the detective and Doris - completely unpalatable. One can accept the exaggerated characterisation and predictable plot, but the quite frankly poor writing style and aforementioned formatting problems tips this novel from light holiday fiction into trash.

I almost expected the cancer-stricken Doris, who later makes a miraculous recovery with the aid of unspecific "new trial drug", to be the murderess - purely because that would be the sort of far-fetched 'twist' that a clumsy writer would throw in, in a last ditch attempt to add some unexpected drama to the story. Luckily, the author keeps a scrap of credibility by this not being the case, but unlike the Professor Niemann in the closing chapters, this book cannot be saved.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like philosophy and even studied it at A Level, but this had far too much philosophy in it even for me! The book needed a lot of editing as well. It got very distracting at time. As for the conversations, they were very stilted at times. There was no flow to it.
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The editing is very poor, numbers in odd places, odd capital letters, odd placement at start of paragraphs. The writing reads like a poor translation, however the story is average, enough to hold your interest on wet day.
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This started off quite well as a standard murder mystery but as the story unfolded, unfortunately the writing got worse and worse. The characters were clichéd and poorly drawn and the descriptive writing was, in places, just plain silly. The murder victim was Greek and as far as the author was concerned, despite the fact that he was a respected Professor of Philosophy, his family members were, stereotypically, a restaurateur and a builder. Not particularly likely and possibly, just a bit racist. Sorry but it just wasn't worth bothering to struggle on as by the time I got to chapter 3, I really didn't care about any of the characters or even who the murderer was at all.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was disappointed with this Kindle freebie mainly due to the literal errors that ran through out the novel.
The story revolves around a series of murders connected to a group of people that discuss philosophy. There are many quotes from philosophers and associated discussions.
There is an unbelievable scenario of a detective confiding and seeking help from a member of the group.
The story didn't flow and the characters were undeveloped. It had a predictable ending.
If you're into philosophy you may like this story.
Rating between 2 to 3 stars. I decided on 3.
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