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A Fatal Intervention (DCI Tom Caton Manchester Murder Mysteries Series Book 4) by [Rogers, Bill]
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A Fatal Intervention (DCI Tom Caton Manchester Murder Mysteries Series Book 4) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 71 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

Bill Rogers is an education consultant. A teacher by profession, Bill now lectures widely on discipline and behaviour management issues, classroom management, stress and teaching, colleague support, developing peer-support programs for teachers and developing community-oriented policies for behaviour management, based on whole-school approaches. He works in every area of education (primary, post-primary and tertiary) conducting in-service programs for teachers, lecturing widely at Colleges of Education and Universities, working with parent groups and students in schools. He has taken seminars, in-services, lecture-programs and developed in-school workshops across Australasia, New-Zealand, U.K, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and Estonia; in the past thirty years. You can visit Bill's website here: http: //www.billrogers.com.au/

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 671 KB
  • Print Length: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Caton Books; Third Edition edition (25 July 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0044443OW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 71 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #48,580 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first few chapters of this book are a superbly executed description of a man being arrested and processed for alleged rape, which should serve as a salutary warning to any man thinking that casual sex with a stranger is a good idea. The rest of the book doesn't quite maintain the standard, although it is well-written and a good, pacy read.

With the rape allegation withdrawn the central character, a young Manchester-based barrister, is off the hook, but instead becomes hooked on the tragic back-story of the woman who (falsely) accused him. He follows her to London, where he has a series of encounters with nasty people, none of which really go anywhere (the nasty people don't appear again). He also starts to receive some sinister rhyming text messages, accompanied by the murders of people connected with his professional life. Back in Manchester, he eventually discovers who's committing the murders, in a reveal that just (and only just) stays short of the "you didn't guess who the murderer was, reader, because we didn't tell you they even existed until page 436' school of crime writing. Meanwhile (and rather frustratingly), the central mystery the lawyer has been trying to solve remains, basically, unsolved.

Despite that there are still plenty of things to enjoy, including the portrayal of the cagey (and shifting) relationship between the lawyer and the police, and solid detail on police and legal procedure. There are even some nicely handled hints of romance. There's also, however, just a hint of this book being assembled from a series of pre-fabricated modules (perhaps using creative writing software designed to help you assemble novels from pre-fabricated modules), rather than written as a single whole in which characters and story flow continuously.
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There are far too many typos and continuity errors in the Kindle edition. Are these in the printed version or simply transcription errors? It really affected the experience of reading the book. Mis-spellings, apostrophes in plurals - a pet peeve of mine and very annoying. During the description of the online counselling session, the therapist's name keeps changing every few lines. Does no-one proof read these things? Or is that why they are so cheap? I noticed errors in the other books I have read in this series but this title was particularly bad. I have one left to read and hope the same problem does not recur. I have in general enjoyed the books, but the errors are infuriating.
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It actually makes me feel quite sad that I've given this book just 2 stars but I feel altogether duped by it and as such cannot rate it any higher. Before I go on to review A Fatal Intervention as a story I would like to point out that, although I spotted the odd punctuation mistake, I did not experience the level of errors that many reviewers have highlighted. I purchased my Kindle copy of this book on 1st January 2013 so it would appear that the vast majority of the mistakes have been corrected.

Anyway, on to the review... I bought this book, as I suspect most people will, because it is billed by Amazon as well as by the authors own website as the 4th DCI Tom Caton story. IT IS NOT. My progress recorder on my Kindle told me I was 62% of the way through the story before Tom is even mentioned and from that point onwards he appears as an extremely peripheral character, present in very few scenes, with minimal lines of dialogue. DI Gordon Holmes is in the story from the start and appears at various points throughout but for me this is not enough for this to be counted as one of the series.

The story is told from the point of view of Rob Thornton, a barrister who, as the product description says, is wrongly accused of rape before being dragged into spiral of even dirtier deeds. I found the character of Rob thoroughly bizarre. Here we have an educated and supposedly rational individual who, because of his career, is well aware of the procedures and workings of the police and yet his choices and actions throughout the story wouldn't be out of place in a dodgy crime storyline on any of the TV soap operas whose residents seem so determined to mistrust and misuse the police and their associates.
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Some have mentioned that they felt frustrated as Tom Caton is a minor character in this story, which focusses instead on a Manchester barrister who accused on a crime he did not commit. I found the first 2/3 of this book engaging and an interesting "whodunit." Unfortunately, the old Bill Rogers habit of long-windedness kicked in and the dénouement was grindingly slow to get to. Rob Thornton is mostly a believable character - although again Mr Rogers is in love with his creation - and the emotions he experiences following his early morning visit from the police feel right. The co-incidences in the story are a bit too much, but this is often the case with crime stories, so it is at an acceptable level. It would be interesting to meet Rob again in his official capacity as a barrister. As a defence lawyer against Tom Caton would be good as Mr Rogers would have to decide on whose "side" he would be on!
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