FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Farewell Britannia: A Fam... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Farewell Britannia: A Family Saga Of Roman Britain Paperback – 16 Apr 2008

4.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£4.36 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: W&N (16 April 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753823705
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753823705
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 736,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

the greatest acheivement of this magnificent work is its success in breathing life into real people (THE HERALD)

Book Description

A vivid and gripping account of Roman Britain, written as a family history

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
You may have read Simon Young's book "500 AD", in which case you'll know what to expect, as he sets out to make his learning as accessible as possible. Of course, lots of authors research an aspect of history and write a novel based on it (the Sharpe novels or even `The da Vinci Code'), but Young is something slightly different, a historian writing plausible fiction.
AD500 was about Britain and Ireland in the `Dark Ages', as the title suggests and `Farewell Britannia' covers the period from 55BC to 430AD. The story is told from the point-of-view of a Romano-Briton at the end of this period as his society descends into anarchy. He reviews the history of his family over 500 years and relives turning points in the family's fortunes, selected by the author to be both dramatic and informative, with the emphasis on the dramatic. There are fifteen chapters, linked by a family tree so you can see that the chapter you are now starting is about the grandson of the woman who was the main character of the previous chapter, plus some words of introduction from the 430AD Romano-Briton. Then it's told from the point-of-view of the chapter's main character and Young shows his eye for a plot that will engage a 21st century audience. There's Caesar's 55BC expedition to England, an attack on the Antonine Wall, an affair between a master and slave, an espionage plot in London, a visit to a druid temple, a death in the baths at Bath, and so on. Personally I didn't find any dud chapters at all, but if you did each one is only 15 pages long so you could easily skip to the next one.
Are there any problems? There's the obvious issue of plausibility with so many dramatic things happening to one family but fiction is the willing suspension of disbelief and I was engrossed in each chapter.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I borrowed this book from my local library but I'm now buying my own copy. This book is brilliant! It is a mix of facts and fiction and is beautifully written. It had me hooked like a good novel and intrigued like a good text book. It is full of interesting vignettes about Roman and Celtic/Pictish life in Britain. It had me laughing and crying and feeling better informed - what more can you want?
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is for me a slightly uneasy amalgam of fact and fiction detailing episodes in the birth, life and death of Roman Britain. It connects historical names found in primary sources through the family of Togidubnus's Atrebates clan. It is an excellent way of learning about Roman Britain, though I am not sure the fictional element really added to the impact of the book - large parts of each mini-story were background explanation anyway. I suppose it is a bit like the historical docudramas that are now very common. I am sure this style does help to bring history to life for many people, but I am probably a bit of a purist - I like fiction to be clearly fiction (though based on historical fact or reasonable extrapolations therefrom), and fact to be clearly fact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In "Farewell Britania," Simon Young explores the rise and fall of Roman Britain through a series of short stories, told in 430 AD by one of the last survivors of a noble Roman family. Each story is based to one degree or another on known events, real persons, or archaeological discoveries, and at the end of each chapter Young carefully explains where his tale is based in fact and where he takes poetic license. Many of the tales are gripping or poignant or both, and Young does a fine job of making the reader feel, just a little, what it might have been like to live through these turbulent times. The notes at the end of the book, about reading and writing Roman Britain, are worth a look for their own sake.

"Farewell Britannia" is something of a prequel to Young's 2005 book A.D. 500: A Journey Through the Dark Isles of Britain and Ireland, which recounts the adventures of an embassy dispatched to Britain in the early 6th Century by the Byzantine Emperor. "A.D. 500" struck me as more of an adventure story than "Farewell Britannia,", although it too is well grounded in known events, customs, and archaeology; "Farewell Britannia," given its parallel them of the declining fortunes of a family and a country, is more moving. Both books are well worth reading and savoring.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book. It succeeds in that most difficult of literary tasks, namely `getting under the skin' and `seeing out of the eyes' of people from another civilisation altogether. As such, I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about Roman Britain and somehow experience `what it felt like'.

Only one thing spoils it - and ultimately spoils it quite a bit, detracting from the pleasure of reading. The punctuation is... eccentric, to put it kindly. In some places it reads like a big - really BIG - bag of commas has been taken and strewn over the text like seeds or confetti. There's commas - lots of them - where they're not really needed or absolutely shouldn't be, plus glaring gaps that do need commas to prevent them reading oddly (or, in one case, as comical).

Consequently, to me, reading this book felt like the literary equivalent of driving a car that misfires or stalls every few yards. It doesn't enhance the ride.

In short, a very good and highly recommended book - but any chance of re-editing and re-issuing it, post purging the commas?
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback