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The Family from One End Street (Puffin Classics) Paperback – 25 May 1995

4.8 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

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Paperback, 25 May 1995
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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; New edition edition (25 May 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140367756
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140367751
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,232,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Eve Garnett was born in 1900 in Worcestershire, and studied art at Chelsea Polytechnic and the Royal Academy School of Art. Whilst a student, she sketched the people of the East End slums and was haunted by the poverty she had witnessed, resolving to do something to bring the plight of the working-class family to people's attention. The Family from One End Street was originally published by Frederick Muller in 1937, followed by The Further Adventures of the Family from One End Street in 1956, and Holiday at Dew Drop Inn in 1962. She died in 1991. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

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By A Customer on 2 April 2006
Format: Paperback
I bought this book after hearing the author Jacqueline Wilson recommend it on T.V., up till then I'd never heard of it. ( It was published in the 1930's, long before I was born). Let me tell you I'm so glad that I did! This book is excellent. I was intrigued by Ms Wilson's comments on how the book is about poor children with holes in their clothes, and it makes such a change to read about the adventures of a working class family rather than the usual more privileged children. It's not a dark kitchen sink drama either. This book is full of the charm and humour of what life can be like in a large family with not much money to go round. Even though it was written in the 1930's it has suprisingly modern language and turns of phrase, the only aspect of the book which gives away it's age is the freedom the children enjoy. Walking for miles by themselves, smuggling on to boats, been given lifts by strangers...a lot of it will make the modern reader gasp, and feel a bit sad that we live in a much more cautious age.
The Puffin classic edition is beautifully published with Eve Garnett's original charming illustrations,a gorgeous cover and red endpapers.
Lastly, I think that this book will appeal to both boys and girls,as the adventures are had by both. I loved reading this book!!
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Format: Paperback
My aunt bought me this book in 1956, when I was 10. It was always one of my great favourites.
It's a lovely book. I've never forgotten it. I think Eve Garnett won the Carnegie Prize with it in about 1947. If you've got a child who loves reading, do buy them this book. I've just found it while browsing through Amazon, and I'm going to buy myself a new copy of it and read it again.
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By A Customer on 17 Feb. 2004
Format: Paperback
I first read this book 30 years ago and remember it vividly; it is one of the books that has stayed fondly in my memory ever since. The family are realistic, the "adventures" are plausible and being a sensitive child I could relate to them very well. The family may be from a different era but the issues - lack of money, big families are as relevant today as ever. Really a book to cherish forever.
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Format: Paperback
This is the story of life in the Ruggles family. The father is a dustman and the mother takes in laundry. There are 7 children- three girls and four boys. This book is full of charm and humour of what life was like for a large family in the 1930s. We hear about their adventures and the fun and mischief they get up to in times when children could enjoy their freedom, and how they entertain themselves for next to nothing, which is just as well, because the Ruggles were very poor. Amongst their exploits they allow a stranger to draw them and then pay for them to go on a boat trip - without asking their parents! Go on a car journey with strangers and visit their home! ... Things that we would never dream of allowing our children to do nowadays, but at the same time makes the reader feel sad that the days of trust innocence have long passed us by. A wonderful book full of heart-warming characters.

The Puffin edition that I own is full of Eve Garnett's gorgeously sweet illustrations that really add to the quaintness of this book.
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Format: Paperback
When at first my eight year old son asked me to read to him The Family from One End Street, the title alone left me feeling it was to be a short lived literal adventure. On occasion we start a book and get no further than chapter two before listening and reading becomes laborious. Equally as frequent a gem come along that will have them pleading 'Please.... Daddy one more chapter' For your information in recent years Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Enid Blyton The Faraway Tree Series and the Enchanting, Rowan of Rin Series from author Emily Rodda have been raging successes for all my children.
Back to One End Street, Eve Garnett is an author I know little about but this book is excellently written and as the tale unrolls you will get to know and love every one of the large Ruggles Family. Each chapter leaps seamlessly from one member of the family to the next and left us feeling we knew and like that family member. From the Ruggles twins, two very independent boys, out to prove that they are worthy recruits into the secretive Black Hand Gang to baby Williams's entry in the local best baby competition all the adventures where simple, humorous, exciting and yet believable. I have never read a similar book and I wish Eve had written more, perhaps she has but I have yet to find any.
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Format: Paperback
Like one of your previous reviewees I also first read this book when I was 10 years old. I am now 48 and periodically read this book to keep me focused on how lucky I am now regarding all the many household gadgets, i.e. washing machines and tumble driers. If only Rosie could have seen into the future what would she have said!! Part of my childhood days were steamy ones with washing hanging around being dried and aired and having to make the fire in the grate to heat the kitchen each morning. No central heating then. How did we all manage, especially our Mothers who had very cold hands from hanging out washing in winter and chapped hands from the wringing of the clothes using a mangle. Were they happy days as portrayed in this book? It seems so.
Janice Hughes
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