Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping option on this book. Guaranteed very good quality. Used but still in excellent condition for the next owner.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Falling Man Paperback – 18 May 2007

3.5 out of 5 stars 108 customer reviews

See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 18 May 2007
£0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£2.49

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Airside ed edition (18 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330453173
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330453172
  • Package Dimensions: 23 x 14.6 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (108 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,444,527 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"'DeLillo understands the capacity of words to establish a distance from things and a mastery over them' Houston Chronicle 'One of America's smartest and most disturbing writers' The Times 'DeLillo shapes a rhetoric for our age' Observer"

Book Description

A magnificent, essential work of fiction about the event which has come to define America at the turn of the twenty-first century. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Love the music done with a synthesizer wicked Hope to find more music like this from this band
BUT OK... Who's the joker that left off tracks 12 Partisan song & 13 Smash it up... from the CD I have had a look on amazon at different CD's ect
And it shows 13 songs can any one work it out as to why this is..... ? ? OR have I lost my marbles .
I have looked at my cd cover sleeve in side and out and it only list's 11 tracks and only plays 11 tracks .
But amazon is showing 13 tracks . The music is fine but for the mix up... I give it 4 stars and I leave you to make your own mind up about the problem And how good it is ..
But I like the tracks on this CD wicked music brill...

Please give your feed back over this soon if any one can work it out... Many thanks
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was so looking forward to this book, with all the rave reviews and calls of 'genius'. But, I'm sorry to say, the dialogue is so awful I didn't get past the first few chapters. DeLillo writes the words of others like he is writing prose - it's completely inauthentic, and so off-putting that I couldn't get past it. What a shame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Appealing to a wide audience, this book takes you through daily life and into gun expressed feelings. Absorbing and worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
Not as good as BASIC but still recommended for electro pop lovers!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
DDL has written something clever and funny here but it stretches definition to call it a novel, even more so than Finnegans Wake or Beckett's The Unnameable. It sure looks like the real deal - paper covers, pages, and apparently packed with characters in the conventional sense - Jack Gladney, wife Babette, son Heinrich (apt; you'll see why), an assortment of daughters, ex-sports hack Murray Jay Siskind, Dr Chakravarty, various academics at Jack's college, etc. - but in fact the only person here is DDL himself, relentlessly debating the big issues with himself, death the biggest. Does that matter? No, not when the writing is so excellent - "His bright smile hung there like a peach on a tree" - the philosophising so potent, and the jokes so good. Want to meet the disaster simulation team that uses a real emergency as a practice run for their big simulation? Or the college professor who tutors Hitler studies only to be taught German by the Fuhrer himself? It's all here, including a tacked-on bit at the very end which was obviously a leftover from the planning stage and refused to fit anywhere else. Like I said, not a novel, but a splendid, intelligent and hilarious soliloquy on life, matter, energy and death. The whole damned shooting match, as "Jack Gladney" comes to realise. ADDENDUM JANUARY 22 2016 I should have stressed death more in the above review as it's one of the main themes - put simply, how can we as self-aware beings cope with the constant terror of oblivion? Various "characters", inasmuch as we have any here, try various ploys to achieve this state of divine repression, including a community of German nuns who only pretend to believe in the whole Roman Catholic charade of angels and afterlife to encourage the non-believers. The last word in this 40-chapter novel (maybe significant) is "dead", though the writing is alive as it gets.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I read Evelyn Waugh’s Scoop. People say it is the funniest novel ever written. I don’t think I didn’t get the jokes; I just didn’t find them funny. Don’t get me wrong. I like a comedy novel. I love PG Wodehouse. I fell off the bed laughing at Catch 22. I prefer Graham Greene’s entertainments to his novels.
I have the same feeling about White Noise as I had with Scoop.
The basic comedic premise of White Noise is that we all live repetitious, vacuous lives of suburban ennui, so why are we all so scared of dying and leaving it all behind. Or is the joke more that we live such intellectually empty lives of vapid consumerism and channel hopping that the only thing we have to think about is our own demise and that, if we lived closer to edge, we would not be so preoccupied with dying? Either way, it’s all about the inversion quiet suburban riskless security/dying and death defying danger/living.
The book riffs on this throughout. The apparently safe suburbanites are pursued by death wherever they go: a visit to the doctor can bring on a death sentence and spills of toxic waste can happen anywhere at any time. There is no antidote to this fear of death. Or is there? Perhaps there is a drug to repress this fear. And this is where the madness begins.
The suburbanite’s fear of ending the living death that is his life is not the only joke. There are many others. Mostly these are similar inversions: the children who show more maturity and judgment than their infantile parents, and the philistine academics who don’t understand the basics of their own subject and who are constantly on the lookout for undemanding subjects to create easy to pass courses in order to attract more students.
Read more ›
4 Comments 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book felt like a chore to read, and I felt somewhat guilty that I responded this way due to its 9/11 subject matter. The prose was often impenetrable and hard to follow and the narrative voice felt turgid and affected.

Claire Messud's The Emperor's Children does a much better job I feel of bringing his period in US history and New York living to life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category