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Fallen Angel [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000CNE088
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 142,689 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
There is a great deal in Fallen Angel that does not stack up. The dialogue and characterisation of the heroine does not convince us as viewers, and therefore would not be potent enough to bring about the change in the characterisation of the film's anti-hero, and there his salvation. The hard-boiled cop from New York, with the farcical interrogation technique, does not gell either. But even with these significant flaws, the Fallen Angel qualifies as an outstanding film noir: Dana Andrews makes more than a good fist of the role, and portrays a vulnerability that you know compels him to do bad things, and Linda Darnell, in the femme fatale role, easily draws you in, as does the main location for plot development, the tiny diner on the quayside, surrounded by fog and a sense of foreboding. The flaws of the Fallen Angel are forgiven and, once seen, the film is not forgotten. Almost a masterpiece.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I have to agree with Mr Taylor in support of Alice Faye and Fallen Angel. It is well known that Alice left Fox because of the severe cutting to her scenes and walked out with years still remaining on her contract at $5,500 per week ! Let's get this right - Alice Faye was a huge star at Fox - Linda Darnell never was - she was a leading lady and a very capable and beautiful actress but Linda Darnell was not a cash cow to Fox as Alice had been for a decade.The mutilation of Alice's scenes so upset her at a studio preview that she got in her car and threw her dressing room keys to the gate man as she drove off the lot that she had been queen of for some 10 + years. Betty Grable had it written into her contract that she had to be photographed in colour - Alice Faye had Director approval in her contract and was the only star at Fox with this clause. Zanuck did not want to lose Alice Faye but he did want her to toe the line and stick to musicals so he probably had a direct hand in the deletion of some of her key scenes which gave a fuller interpretation to her characterisation of June Mills. Zanuck was always involved in the editing of his films and in this case he gaffed as he lost Alice Faye and therefore a great deal of income to Fox. I think that although the June Mills character is not fully flesh and blood , faye does a fairly good job of trying to make her so and the quoting from the bible in the hotel room is fantastic. I have read several books about Preminger and he was happy with Faye's performance in Fallen Angel but even Otto could not stop Zanuck tampering which is sad as Fox and the public lost a warm, tender and capable actress at only 30 years of age.
Judge Fallen Angel knowing the facts please.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having read some other reviews of Fallen Angel, more than one critiscizes Alice Faye's performance as shallow and not equal to that of Linda Darnell.
However in Alice's defence it must be pointed out that her performance as seen in the finished print was far short of what she had originally created. It is a well documented fact that she filmed several other scenes with Dana Andrews which according to Alice added dimension and motivation to her character. In one of these she sang the song Slowly as it played on the car radio (in the film it is heard on the juke box several times sung by Dick Haymes) in a dramatic scene ending in a row with Dana Andrews at the end of which he slapped her.

Alice had believed that Fallen Angel would initiate a new period in her screen career, with more serious roles. She had very high hopes of it, working with the star and director of 1944's Laura. However, in the editing, the emphasis of the story was shifted to bad girl Stella at the expense of June. Whether this happened at Preminger's or Zanuck's instruction is not known, but it caused a huge rift between Alice and Darryl F Zanuck. Alice, aware that her performance was no longer as effective as she wanted, is alleged to have left a preview screening of Fallen Angel at the studio in tears, never to return until 1962. In the late 1940's Fox sent many scripts to her in the hope of wooing her back - eg A Letter to three wives - but all to no avail.

So, I do ask modern viewers to bear all that in mind. Alice's characterization shows June to be a warm, romantic individual who is literally swept off her feet and it is her trusting belief in Eric which prevails in the end. She understands Eric's shortcomings but believes her love can transcend them, which it does.
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Format: DVD
This 1945 thriller has all the necessary ingredients for a first-rate film noir. Dana Andrews is more than qualified to play the noir anti-hero (the actor alternates here, as he does in most of his films, between contempt-for-the-world and contempt-for-himself); Linda Darnell is a voluptuous femme fatale (she is not evil, just easily bored); Otto Preminger, the director, is a masterful stylist, particularly in his controlled and expressive use of the camera (as he demonstrated in "Laura," made the year before). And yet, despite all this, the film doesn't take off. It's not so much that the story doesn't work but that the film doesn't achieve the balance of stark realism and primal fantasy (as Freud called it) which characterizes the best noirs. The key failing is Alice Faye who plays the anti-fatale heroine. It is a difficult role to pull off (her character asks us to wake up, to stop dreaming) and Faye can't manage it. She's no replacement for Darnell -- on the screen or in our dreams.
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