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The Falklands War, 1982 (Penguin Classic Military History) Paperback – 1 Mar 2001

4.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Revised edition (1 Mar. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141390557
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141390550
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 13.3 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 874,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Martin Middlebrook is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the author of The Kaiser's Battle: March 1918 (Classic Penguin Military History, September 2000) and The First Day on the Somme (Classic Penguin Military History, May 2001).


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I was eleven in 1982, so whilst I remember the names of "Goose Green" "Exocet" and "General Belgrano", my knowledge of the events of the Falklands war was rather patchy. This account gives full information and personal accounts from both Islanders and Soldiers who lived through the campaign. It is largely free from political accounts, which is good, as the build-up and final battles are not hindered by events happening in Whitehall and Buenos Aires, and so is allowed to develop into a ripping narrative. One criticism I do have, is of Middlebrook's reluctance to criticise the British military for some of the glaring mistakes that were made, namely in the sinking of the Sheffield (this will have to be revised in light of the recent BBC programme), and the Sir Galahad. But all-in-all this is a very good book.
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By A Customer on 18 Nov. 2001
Format: Paperback
Martin Middlebrook's The Falklands War provides a well researched account of the 3rd Commando Brigade battalions in the Falklands. The book includes a series of short pieces in which former members of the British brigade, from officer to private soldier, present fascinating accounts of their personal experiences. Nick van der Bijl's Nine Battles To Stanley continues the story. Bijl, a spanish-speaking officer attached to 3rd Commando Brigade Headquarters for the campaign, tells for the first time the land battles of the Falklands, as seen through the eyes of both sides. The platoons of Second Lieutenant Diego Aristegui and First Lieutenant Victor Rodriguez-Perez, which carried out the only two nocturnal counterattacks during the Wireless Ridge battle were a typical well-knit group. During the Two Sisters Ridge battle the 4th Regiment platoon of Second Lieutenant Marcelo Llambias-Pravaz blocked 45 Commando's progress for three hours before caving in. Indeed, there is overwhelming evidence that without the British Paras and Royal Marine Commandos, the fierce battles in Port Stanley's outskirts may not have been won or at least with massive casualties.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book some years ago in when it was called Task Force. Since then I've read around a dozen books on the Falklands War and this is still the best in my opinion.
Required reading for anyone with an interest in this area.
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Format: Paperback
My first experience of the work of Martin Middlebrook was in 1979. I was studying the WW2 loss of HMS’ Repulse and Prince of Wales at that time and came to value his book (co-written with Patrick Mahoney) on the subject so highly I still rue the day I loaned it out - never to be seen again (yes, it was replaced but it’s not the same!). My point being that since that time, I have read many accounts of that particular naval loss and none have been either as accurate or as complete as that one. The same can be said of this book!

Although I missed the Falklands War (I was serving in N. Ireland at the time), I did serve in the British Army for 27 years up to 1993 and know many who were there - largely because I served with 2 Para and 3 Para a few years afterwards.

Many accounts of the Falklands War were rushed into print almost before the dust had settled on the Battlefield. Of these, some were accurate, others were not. This author, however, waited three years before producing his own carefully constructed account (published as ‘Operation Corporate’) which proved to be so factually accurate that only a few trivial errors needed to be corrected in this up-dated version. Most importantly, in this work we find new information on; A. The 3 incidents of British Forces firing on British Forces previously omitted ‘for the sake of the families,’ B. The work of Special Forces on the Argentinean mainland, C. The last ever Vulcan Bomber raid on Stanley Airport (and if I am reading the ‘Black Buck Tanker Plan’ correctly - even the refuelling aircraft had to be refuelled and then refuelled again in order to provide the final refuelling for the Vulcan Bombers!) and D.
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Format: Paperback
As a veteran of this war I have naturally read a few historic accounts of the Falklands war, but none has gripped me more than this account. The author has written this in such a way that you just want to keep on turning the pages, for the next attack\battle\event. A lot of facts, figures and dates that gives the reader the whole picture in a simplified way. Well worth a read!!
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