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The Fairy's Tale (The Pathways Tree Book 1) by [Lee, F. D.]
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The Fairy's Tale (The Pathways Tree Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Length: 333 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Faith has a Master's degree in Applied Linguistics, which makes her the life and soul of any party, especially one made up of the kind of people who like a joke about the passive (it's all fun and games until an eye is lost).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1290 KB
  • Print Length: 333 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00T3E9QL8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #112,159 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Review This partly a story about free will in an Orwellian state... and partly a story about stories.

Bea is a cabbage fairy who wants to be a fairy godmother. Fairies aren't usually made godmothers... least of all cabbage fairies. In the meantime things are going wrong in the state - the mirrors are breaking and the human belief in Fae is fading.

This is a well thought out, well realised world. It's also funny. Bea is a bit of a bumbling Everywoman (Everyfairy?) at the beginning, but gets stronger and stronger as a character as the book progresses.

My favourite character is probably Ana - the ugly sister who isn't mean or stupid. She definitely gets the best lines. The relationship between her and her step sister Sindy is lovely too. King John was a bit annoying at first, but grew on me as we got to see more of him.

The ending was dramatic and Happy For Now (you can't really have a Happy Ever After for Bea, seeing as the book is about narrative convention and predetermined plots!). There were a lot of loose threads at the end of the book - what happened to Seven? And who/what is Mistasinon? What's the story with Melly? And Bea's family? All fodder for sequels, I guess.

All in all, good fun. If you like Terry Pratchett, or the Artemis Fowl books, you'll like this.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I wondered what was in store for me as I started reading, wondering if this would be a traditional fairytale or not, and I was rewarded with a funny and poignant tale of stubborn resistance to prejudice and expectations. I enjoyed reading about Bea's exploits. She is a maverick and I like mavericks. In The Fairy's Tale you travel with Bea with her struggles to overcome the challenges and prejudices arrayed against her as she seeks to move up the ranks of the Fae, become a fairy godmother and manage more and more plots involving humans and increasing their faith in the fairytales. The Orwellian themes I particularly liked and felt quite topical given the recent dark rise of identity politics and I am definitely on the side of Bea as she persistently ignores the 'safe and sensible' advice and follows her instincts to complete a plot that's is given to her and succeed, with a little help from others and become accepted to train as a godmother at The Academy. Without too many spoilers, I will just further say there are some intriguing characters I want to know more about and I also enjoyed the commentary on the world of the Fae, the different tribes and the alternative take on the fairy tale.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Was recommended this book by a fellow lover of Terry Pratchett and it did not disappoint. Definitely worth a read.
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Format: Paperback
Have just completed The Fairy's Tale and have The Academy waiting in the shadows to be read. I initially started reading this in the very rare breaks in my life; quiet night shifts, coffee shops in between engagements etc, and quickly found myself drawn in to picking up the book wherever I could. Richly drawn characters that blur the line between good and evil and an incredibly well written and witty narrative that continually draws you into the story somewhere in the void between John Connolly and Neil Gaiman. There will be many people that I will be passing this book onto in the hope that it invades their spare time with the same verocity that it invaded mine....
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Format: Paperback
It's billed as Cinderella meets 1984, but with those evil creatures in white coats hanging around ready to "redact" people who won't dance to their tune, there's a good bit of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest thrown in. With garden fairy Bea being pulled from pillar to post, and not sure what to believe, it's a surprise she doesn't go mad at the end of it all - a female Jack Nicholson, if you like. My wife bought me this book for Xmas and though it's not my usual genre I was pleasantly surprised. It puts a refreshing new slant on the stories of airbrushed Princesses and Handsome regal steroid takers that Disney tries to persuade my young daughter is the norm. Highly original.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It’s a very interesting setup, I love the world and most of the characters in it. They’re definitely not perfect and I caught myself shouting at them from time to time: “what are you doing! Don’t be stupid!” – all in vain of course. Literary characters tend to arrogantly ignore us, no matter what.

But shouting at characters, instead of the author is always a good sign. It shows I’ve been sucked into caring about them, and I did. Despite being fairy tale characters, they couldn’t have been more human. I especially loved the friendship of the main character Bea, and Joan and Melly. It felt like my friendship with my friends: we quarrel, we make mistakes but we love each other.

The world feels well thought out. The mix of all the different fairy tale characters with a new spin, has worked beautifully and sometimes hilariously. It reminded me of the TV series Once Upon a Time but only because of the way the author took freedom on the original stories. It felt very entertaining.

There’s a big hole left after finishing the book. The story of “the characters” of Bea’s plot has been done and dusted, that of Bea and her friends, hasn’t. Of course there’s a sequel so it’s a genius way to make me want to go on reading about their journey, since I’m still in the middle of it, lots of unfinished business and open questions.

The only critique I would leave here is that there were some spelling and punctuation mistakes left in this edition, and they’re like red flags to this girl here :)
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