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The Faces of World War I: The Great War in words & pictures Paperback – 4 Aug 2014

4.7 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Cassell; 01 edition (4 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844037991
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844037995
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 1.8 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 852,003 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

A picture is worth 1,000 words and Max Arthur has trawled through the archives of the Imperial War Musem to tell the story of the Great War in poignant black and white. --Tribune Magazine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The tragedy of the Great War in words and pictures, covering all aspects and armies who fought.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
There have been other books of photos of World War 1, and one might expect to see the same old images - but this is a collection of many unfamiliar, previously unseen photos - of subjects ranging from the Western Front, Gallipoli, the home front, and behind the lines - and both before, during and after the war.
The large format lends itself to the often panoramic images - and also allows you to see in detail extraordinary and haunting portraits - the 'faces' after which the book is named. It's a collection to please the expert and the interested browser alike - a WWI buff will appreciate the precisely captioned battle scenes - but any reader will feel the impact of the personal quotations which accompany many images - they add an extraordinary dimension to one's understanding of life and conditions in the trenches. It's an immensely moving photo-record, but my heart was particularly wrenched by the three Australian brothers who all died in one two-day attack, the home images of the average, working-class man who went to fight for king and country... not the Eton toffs, but the desperately poor. The images depict a world of contrasts, both in Britain and in Germany - but when it came down to it, all the men at the front were in the same boat, and returned after the conflict to their bleak lives with their terrible disfigurements, mental scars and the memory of lost comrades.
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Format: Hardcover
I agree with the other reviews so will try not to repeat too much in my own review.

Children (and some adults) are all too dismissive of the previous generations and, although I would not recommend showing this to young children, it could help teenagers studying history to get a real sense of the conditions the men fighting in the First World War were subject to. The author does not shy away from showing the dead in photographs and I think it gives the reader something to think about and possibly discuss.

As a book, it is well thought out and presented beautifully. It's a book I would happily leave on my coffee table for friends to flick through. A couple of friends can not understand why I would want to look at pictures from the War (as they find the subject of warfare disturbing) but I've never believed in wrapping people in cotton wool - I think people should know what those men went through and be proud of them. Although it is a collection of frank photographs of war, I think the subject has been handled sensitively too - there are no gratuitous shots what so ever in this book.

Highly recommended to anyone who wants to get a real sense of the lives of the men involved.
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Format: Hardcover
This is first and foremost a picture book. As you might expect, there are many uncomfortable images, but it is a far more balanced book than that. There are many depictions of strong comradeship and even happiness amongst the desperate conditions and casualties of the trenches. Without much in the way of text, it doesn't fully, even with pictures, convey the 'grit' of the WW1 experience that I think many of today's, removed generation would like to understand. But as a picture book, it has no rival, and is beautifully printed.
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By Mike Watkinson TOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 May 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I often find that 2 & 3* reviews are the most useful ones, in terms of learning something about a product; they tend not to be simple love it / hate it efforts, as 1 & 5* reviews frequently are. Not in this instance. Rufus, in his 2* review, is, I am afraid, talking nonsense. He makes two complaints - the first is that the photo's are just "same old, same old", and he then gives the impression that many are of poorer than normal quality.

Neither are true. I've been keenly interested in The Great War for 30 years or more. I have dozens of books on my shelves, and I've read dozens more, borrowed from libraries. I've seen hundreds upon hundreds of photo's. There's a few in this book that have been used before. Most notably, one of a German officer reading the Kaiser's mobilisation order to a Berlin crowd on 1st August 1914, German infantry marching across open country in open formation, and that of 8 stretcher bearers struggling through knee-deep mud in Flanders, trying to get one stretcher-case back. Possibly only the photo of the Tommy with the "thousand yard stare" is more iconic than the latter (and missing from this book, I might add!). The majority of these I have not seen before.

As for quality, in the first place, these are now century old photo's. In the second, if photography wasn't still in its infancy, it was certainly still in its early childhood. And war photography certainly was in its infancy. Are some shots of less than great quality? Yes. Again, though, the vast majority are fair or better. A few, a very few, are not so good. But then if the author wishes to show something in particular, and his choice is a poorer quality photo or none at all, what is he to do?
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Format: Hardcover
This is a brilliant book. Every picture, many of which I have never seen before tells a different story. Max Arthur has juxtaposed the photographs in chronological order and there is a real drama in the build up to the war from both sides and also in the lead up to the battles of the Somme and Arras. The consequence of the battles is poignantly told not only in photos but in words of the men who fought in them. I was particularly moved by the photo of the packs taken from the bodies of the dead, the photo shows British soldiers searching through for anything that can be sent home to the dead man's next of kin.

One particular photo is accompanied by the words of a young Lieutenant 'Now we die. It is the wet death, the muddy death, death dripping with blood. The bodies lie frozen in the earth which slowly sucks them in. The luckiest depart wrapped in canvas, to sleep in the nearest cemetery.'

But there are lighter moments such as the amazing shot of the Zulus dancing in their full battle costume and the tough looking Australian who the Kaiser loathed because he was always stealing from the German dead. There are many more like this in this memorable book.
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