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The Faber Book of Pop Paperback – 1 Jan 1995

2.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Paperback: 896 pages
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber; New edition edition (1 Jan. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571179800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571179800
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 4.7 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 882,961 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Jon Savage is the author of England's Dreaming: Sex pistols and Punk Rock and Teenage: The Creation of Youth, 1875 - 1945. He has written sleevesnotes for Wire, St. Etienne and the Pet Shop Boys, among others, and his compilations include: Meridian 1970 (Heavenly/EMI 2005); Queer Noises: From the Closest to the Charts 1961 - 1976 (Trikont 2006); and Dreams Come True: Classic Electro 1982-87 (Domino 2008).

Hanif Kureishi was born and brought up in Kent. He read philosophy at King’s College, London. In 1981 he won the George Devine Award for his plays Outskirts and Borderline, and in 1982 he was appointed Writer-in-Residence at the Royal Court Theatre. In 1984 he wrote My Beautiful Laundrette, which received an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay. His second screenplay Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (1987) was followed by London Kills Me (1991) which he also directed. The Buddha of Suburbia won the Whitbread Prize for Best First Novel in 1990 and was made into a four-part drama series by the BBC in 1993. His version of Brecht’s Mother Courage has been produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal National Theatre. His second novel, The Black Album, was published in 1995. With Jon Savage he edited The Faber Book of Pop (1995). His first collection of short stories, Love in a Blue Time, was published in 1997. His story My Son the Fanatic, from that collection, was adapted for film and released in 1998. Intimacy, his third novel, was published in 1998, and a film of the same title, based on the novel and other stories by the author, was released in 2001 and won the Golden Bear award at the Berlin Film Festival. His play Sleep With Me premièred at the Royal National Theatre in 1999. His second collection of stories, Midnight All Day, was published in 2000. Gabriel’s Gift, his fourth novel, was published in 2001. The Body and Seven Stories and Dreaming and Scheming, a collection of essays, were published in 2002. His screenplay The Mother was directed by Roger Michell and released in 2003. In 2004 he published his play When The Night Begins and a memoir, My Ear At His Heart. A second collection of essays, The Word and the Bomb, followed in 2005. His screenplay Venus was directed by Roger Michell in 2006. His novel Something to Tell You was published in 2008. In July 2009 his adaptation of his novel, The Black Album, opened at the National Theatre, prior to a nation-wide tour. In 2010 his Collected Stories were published. He has been awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

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While many of the texts collated in this brick-sized anthology are truly a pleasure to read and provide great inside into many of the cultural issues that have arisen around pop music, I must express my disgust at its disgraceful anglo-centrism. Alongside the Elvises, Sinatras and Beatles, the anthology seems to be padded out with English epiphenomena that could scarcely have caught attention beyond their home shores, while continental Europe - and indeed every other continent bar North America - is arrogantly ignored almost in toto. Sure, this reflects how rags like Rolling Stone's '500 greatest' lists tend to read, but it certainly doesn't give us pop in all its richness and diversity. Indeed, one of the most interesting things about pop is that through its incredible mobility and its imbrication with certain currents of global capital, in many contexts it has become associated with cultural neo-colonialism. Great musicians from Brazil to France have rejected and sought to break apart these tendencies of pop and have created rich new forms, at times explicitly in the name of decolonisation. But you wouldn't have thought so from reading this book.
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