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The Eyes of the Dragon Paperback – 8 May 2006

4.5 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

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Paperback, 8 May 2006
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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks; New edition edition (8 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340899069
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340899069
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.6 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 385,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Amazon Review

A kingdom is in turmoil as the old king dies and his successor must do battle for the throne. Pitted against an evil wizard and a would-be rival, Prince Peter makes a daring escape and rallies the forces of Good to fight for what is rightfully his. This is a masterpiece of classic dragons-and-magic fantasy that only Stephen King could have written! --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Classic King, fine characters, compellingly written in a gripping, well-honed plot (Daily Express on WOLVES OF THE CALLA)

Join the quest before it's too late (Independent on Sunday on SONG OF SUSANNAH)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
excellent book
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful read, a great king book
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Format: Paperback
This book was an interesting read, because it was more like a piece of epic fantasy than a work of horror. In fact, King himself faced a backlash after the book was released, and the subsequent furore inspired the plot of Misery, with Annie’s obsession acting as a metaphor for his demanding, dissatisfied readers.

It’s a shame, because speaking personally, I loved it. In fact, it’s refreshing to see King flexing a different set of authorial muscles, and it certainly proved a point – the man knows how to tell a story, no matter the genre. It’s also a great little read if you have kids and want to introduce them to King without giving them nightmares.

The plot has a classic feel while still seeming original and innovative, following the tale of two princes after their father is murdered and the heir to the throne is imprisoned for the crime. We, the readers, know that he’s innocent, but everyone else thinks that he’s guilty because he cried when the murder was revealed to him. And so they lock him up at the top of a tower and his younger brother assumes the throne, under the beady, watchful eye of a twisted magician named Flagg.

Flagg is interesting, because he appears elsewhere in King’s work. He’s the antagonist of The Stand, and he also appears in his Dark Tower series – along with several other minor characters and several of the themes throughout the manuscript. Here, he seems like more of a cliche, but crucially he’s not too much of a cliche. It’s kind of necessary for the story to be what it is – a scintillating twist on the fantasy genre, and one that’s beautifully crafted by a master storyteller.

If you only like King because you like horror then this isn’t the book for you.
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Format: Paperback
Wonderful stuff. King's classic horror fare, while generally entertaining, can be sometimes be too long-winded for me (although I haven't read his recent stuff). But this... if you liked the old Mumfie adventures, or say The Thief Of Always, you will so dig this. A simple tale belonging in the overcrowded childrens' fantasy genre - but like the above examples, intoxicating, beautifully narrated and illustrated, laced with funny, tender and dark scenes, carried along by some memorable characters. It's not as explicitly gruesome as many of his other stories, but there's plenty of cruelty, injustice and suffering, orchestrated by a fascinating and devious villain. And there's a bittersweet climax, with a sublime moment of forgiveness, which always brings a tear to my cynical eye. A perfectly self-indulgent enduring escape for all ages. For me, Stephen King's best, and not by coincidence, the most whimsical - and by all accounts one of his most personal.
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Format: Paperback
Most people either love or hate King's work, strangely i'm in the middle. Christine, Salem's Lot and Bag of Bones really bored me ( although i can appreciate why people would enjoy them) yet It, 'Everything's Eventual' and The Dark Tower series took my breath away. I read this after IT and the two books are poles apart in storyline but close on high quality. Flagg, is mentioned in the Dark Tower books and is a brilliant character, the intertwining plot is well written and comes together beatifully at the end.

Some people would call this a book for young adults and is a little below the age range of normal king readers but that is a little narrow minded. The easy to follow style of writing makes it accessible for most ages. I highly recommend this book if you enjoy the Dark tower area of King's writing.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of the things I like about Stephen King is his versatility as a storyteller. Yes, he focuses on horror and the supernatural -- telekinetic teenagers, vampires, creatures from other dimensions and even a really "killer" flu -- and is therefore not considered to be a "serious" writer. However, considering the vast output of King books and his longevity as a bestselling author, if nearly 30 years of novels, short story collections, screenplays, original teleplays and a loyal fan base doesn't make him a serious writer, I don't know what would.
I used to buy each new King novel either in paperback or, when I could afford it, in hardcover. Gradually my tastes shifted to military fiction by Tom Clancy, Stephen Coonts and Harold Coyle, but I never stopped liking King's books.
One of my favorites is his 1987 excursion into fantasy, The Eyes of the Dragon. Essentially a story for younger readers -- aimed at kids 12 and up -- and beautifully illustrated by David Palladini, it's a classic story of sibling rivalry between the sons of King Roland of Delain. Peter, the bright and handsome first-born, is heir to the throne, while Thomas, who is not as smart and takes after his short and stout father, tries hard to cope with the knowledge that his status in life is secondary to Peter's. Worse, even though he tries hard to gain the love of his father, Thomas is clumsy and not very skilled with his hands. (In one sad scene, Thomas spends a whole day making a small wooden sailboat for his father the King, only to hear his dad remark that it looked like a dog dropping with a handkerchief attached to it.)
Thomas' only friend is the court magician, a pale and brooding fellow named Flagg. He takes a keen interest in Thomas, but not for altruistic reasons.
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