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Expository Apologetics Paperback – 7 Oct 2015

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway; First edition (7 Oct. 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433533790
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433533792
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 314,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Voddie Baucham Jr. (DMin, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) is dean of the seminary at African Christian University in Lusaka, Zambia. Author of a number of books, including Family Driven Faith, The Ever-Loving Truth, and Joseph and the Gospel of Many Colors, Baucham is also a pastor, church planter, and conference speaker.

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Format: Paperback
Cornelius Van Til defined apologetics as the "vindication of the Christian philosophy of life against the various forms of the non-Christian philosophy of life". Voddie Baucham uses this definition as a framework to build a solid apologetic methodology in his newest volume Expository Apologetics: Answering Objections with the Power of the Word. Before you object to the title and claim that Reformed folk are running around creating new titles for a decades-old method, let's dive into this material and find out what's at the heart of the matter.

More than once Voddie claims "the goal is the Gospel". He contends that we must move people from skepticism, or even outright atheism, into a more biblical world view by using the Word as a "bulwark against the tendency to forget how hard it is to believe in the face of constant opposition". He also argues, repeatedly, that we must be committed to apologetics as a consequence, not an innocent bystander of, our commitment to evangelism. That single point makes this volume stand out from the rest not only as an apologetic tool, but one we can all use in our evangelistic enterprise.

This volume does three things very well that I have not found among other introductory works on this vast subject. In Chapter Five we explore the ancient Creeds, Confessions, and Catechism of the church in order to create thriving disciples of Christ. He dispels the myth that apologetics is for the PhD trained Christian in telling us right off the bat that, "when most Christians think apologetics training, they think philosophy, logic, and debate. However the key tools for training the expository apologist are creeds, confessions, and catechisms.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
For the Christian who wants to get their head around how to communicate the Gospel in our day and age, this is an important book to read because it lays out precisely why apologetics and evangelism should (indeed can) never be separated. Fail to do both together and you end up doing neither.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Addition to the Vantilian Tradition 9 Oct. 2015
By dthomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For those familiar with Greg Bahnsen or Cornelius Van Til, the presuppositional methodology presented by Baucham is nothing new; however, the way in which Voddie presents "takes apologetics out of the tower and puts it in the pew," as Patton states in his endorsement of the book. His particular application of this method to preaching, teaching, and discipleship helps to further the work of those in the Vantilian vein of encouraging every believer in engaging the unbelieving worldviews; that apologetics is not only for the "elites," but for every believer.

The book can be divided into two (possibly three) parts:

1.) Introducing the Expository Method (Ch. 1-4)
2.) Application of the Expository Method (Ch. 5-9)

The third possible division of the book would separate chapter 9 "Preaching and Teaching Like an Expository Apologist" and the appendix from chapters 5-8 as 2.) Application for the Layman (5-8) and 3.) Application for Preaching and Teaching (9 w/appendix).

However one divides it, the book is a very practical and challenging addition to the Vantilian tradition, which drives home the point that every Christian everywhere is called to engage in apologetics; and that our goal in apologetics is not to win arguments, but to evangelize — to share the gospel.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Proving and Preaching From Scripture 24 Nov. 2015
By Zach Barnhart - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
As the already post-Christian society we live in grows more post-Christian by the day, it is becoming increasingly more important that we pinpoint exactly how to defend our faith, stand for truth, and engage differing opinions lovingly and willingly in conversation. The widespread reason many of us Christians struggle to do this is, as we say, “we don’t know how.” But after reading Expository Apologetics by popular preacher and apologist Voddie Baucham, we will find ourselves eqipped and even motivated for such engagements. In this succinct and practical book, Baucham has helped us see the urgency to be apologists, and helped us with methods and practices for the battle ahead. In this book, we learn about the method of doing “expository apologetics,” a term coined by Baucham to explain his process.

There are three main ideas Baucham stresses in Expository Apologetics–being biblical, being clear, and being conversational (20). Ironically, this is the overall structure of the book. Baucham starts with a firm biblical foundation in his argument for the art of expository apologetics (chapters 1-4). He then discusses how we assimilate the daunting task of apologetics into a clear, easy to remember system for ourselves and for others (chapters 5-6). Finally, Baucham spends a great deal of time talking about how we engage in conversation as apologists (chapters 7-9).

There are a few particular chapters that stood out to me while reading. Chapter 4 is about Paul’s “expository apologetic.” Baucham essentially demonstrates how Paul is a perfect example of someone who uses this technique. Walking through predominately Romans, we see how Paul literally engages with his audience of Jews. While writing the famous epistle, he stops himself periodically to answer objections he knows his audience is bound to have. Paul then firmly refutes such objections with careful exposition of Scripture, combined with elements of logic, philosophy, and metaphor, all designed to help the audience clearly understand. Baucham sums up Paul’s apologetic ministry well here:

“Paul’s approach to apologetics was not dependent solely upon his ability to comprehend and interact with random facts. Instead, he was dependent upon God’s revelation as his primary and ultimate source of authority. Nor is this to say that there were never times when he made reference to truths revealed elsewhere, or that we are prohibited from doing the same. However, we must bear in mind that those things must always be on the periphery of our approach to apologetics as opposed to the center. Scripture must always remain at the center” (75).

Chapter 5 is an excellent defense of the importance of creeds, confessions, and catechisms, and how they support and inform our quest for better apologetics. Baucham, a noted proponent of catechisms, has excellently demonstrated the necessity of using these tools to absorb truth and to communicate it effectively and accurately.

Finally, another highlight chapter is Chapter 8, “The Expository Apologetic Waltz.” I loved the allegory of a waltz and how it is likened to apologetics. I think it’s a great descriptor of how we actually operate in conversations with skeptics or seekers (144-145). Baucham places large emphasis on presuppositional apologetics throughout the book, and shows its importance notably in this chapter. There is even an appendix in the back that is an explicit example of how we do expository apologetics.

There has been quite a bit of writing devoted to doing apologetics, but many of them focus on specific scientific arguments or getting the right counter-punches down. Expository Apologetics, however, desires to help us understand the theological implications for why we enter this arena, and more so how to engage a culture that’s frankly growing tired of listening.

I recommend Expository Apologetics to anyone trying to better learn how to share or defend their faith, and how to do it biblically.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Answering Objections with the Word of God 22 Dec. 2015
By Don Haflich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Cornelius Van Til defined apologetics as the "vindication of the Christian philosophy of life against the various forms of the non-Christian philosophy of life". Voddie Baucham uses this definition as a framework to build a solid apologetic methodology in his newest volume Expository Apologetics: Answering Objections with the Power of the Word. Before you object to the title and claim that Reformed folk are running around creating new titles for a decades-old method, let's dive into this material and find out what's at the heart of the matter.

More than once Voddie claims "the goal is the Gospel". He contends that we must move people from skepticism, or even outright atheism, into a more biblical world view by using the Word as a "bulwark against the tendency to forget how hard it is to believe in the face of constant opposition". He also argues, repeatedly, that we must be committed to apologetics as a consequence, not an innocent bystander of, our commitment to evangelism. That single point makes this volume stand out from the rest not only as an apologetic tool, but one we can all use in our evangelistic enterprise.

This volume does three things very well that I have not found among other introductory works on this vast subject. In Chapter Five we explore the ancient Creeds, Confessions, and Catechism of the church in order to create thriving disciples of Christ. He dispels the myth that apologetics is for the PhD trained Christian in telling us right off the bat that, "when most Christians think apologetics training, they think philosophy, logic, and debate. However the key tools for training the expository apologist are creeds, confessions, and catechisms." He pounds this point in even further by saying that catechism is the best apologetics training tool we have in our arsenal. A bold statement when one thinks of what type of volume this is.

Alright, I know what you're thinking at this point. "Isn't all that other stuff useful though?" Baucham does not seek to dismiss those other disciplines but they must be in service to the Word of God. We must begin our foundation for any argument on the self-revelation of God. He does not mean that everything needs to be quoted chapter and verse in every conversation, though that wouldn't hurt, but we need to move people in the direction of the gospel. That I confess is impossible without mentioning the Word in the process.

The second unique aspect of this volume is the use of the Decalogue or what us commoners call the Ten Commandments. Voddie expands this content across two chapters. He begins by showing the division of the Ten Commandments in that the first four are vertical, meaning that the first four emphasize our duty to God, and the last six emphasize our duty to other people. I admit I have not thought even that deeply about the commandments or their ethical implications in my day-to-day life, an area I plan to build in the coming days. If we're honest many of us have not thought of these Ten Commandments, and why should we? Not many of us are murders, not many of us steal or bear false witness do we?

Many of us forget that God has set a standard of righteousness not only for the believer but for those outside the fold. Voddie does a masterful job of making the material at this point entirely understandable. He points to the three-fold use of the law in expounding on the commanded obedience which has gone out to us and yet we suppress. He tells us that the "Moral Law encompasses laws that have always been and always will be the same for all people in all places and for all times. These laws reflect the very character of God."

Do you see what he did there? He brought us all into account under the Moral Law by saying that it is a reflection of the very character of God. When we are not acting in accord with the Moral Law we are acting in a manner inconsistent with the character of the very God who fashioned us in His image. We are what Paul called, "suppressing the truth in unrighteousness" (Romans 1:18), a very serious indictment indeed. C.S. Lewis thought very highly of the Moral Law which is why he dragged out his material for four chapters in Mere Christianity.

[Tweet "We have to get outside of our bubbles and interact with real people who have real questions. @DonHaflich @Crossway"]

The final thing I think Voddie does extremely well is putting it all together in a way that is imminently useful for the budding apologist. He gives us three steps to uncovering error in peoples world views. Step One tells us that we must show the other person in the conversation that their world view is inconsistent. We can do this by simply beginning a dialogue on almost any topic. Step Two tells us that we must show them where they are counterfeiting the Word of God in their own philosophy. If we are in the Word daily, this step will be a bit easier for us. Step Three drops the bomb on them when we show them what the real thing looks like.

This volume should be handed out like candy on Halloween. Christians need to be soaked in the Word and understand their own world views before they can engage those with opposing ones. We as parents must drench our children in the Word which teaches them how to think and how to hold up world views to the light of the Gospel. Expository Apologetics gives us the tools we need to begin to use our minds for the glory of God. Surely we must go deeper but this is an excellent foot in the doorway to a house bought and furnished just for us. We have the world at our fingertips and they are desperately searching for something true, good, and holy. We have all of those things living in us by the inheritance of the Holy Spirit. Why not share that with out neighbors, coworkers, and those we meet on the subway?
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love the fact that the book is guided through and ... 12 Oct. 2015
By Adelina Shamoon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A big part of the "renewing your mind" is thinking... Dr. Voddie in Expository Apologetics equips us with simple knowledge and ability to communicate the hope that is in us, and do it with gentleness and humility. I love the fact that the book is guided through and by the Word of God: It reminds us that our goal is GOD.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You would appreciate his style much more in the book if you knew what he sounded like/looked like. But don't be fooled by his ap 31 Dec. 2015
By Nora Svihl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don't be fooled by the long worded title. Voodoo Baucham brings his profound expertise as a scholar. What is most refreshing is his direct, conversational style. You feel as if he is in the room with you speaking to you with all the force of a famous speaker but as friendly and approachable as a friend. Please view his videos on YouTube, or listen to his messages on the Sermon Audio app. His presence is powerful. You would appreciate his style much more in the book if you knew what he sounded like/looked like.

But don't be fooled by his approachability. His references are numerous, and most of them are from well-researched authorities, some of which are fascinating in their antiquity and timelessness. Clearly the mark of a scholar, but the street-smart and directness of a former child growing up in a crime-infested neighborhood. (his life story is briefly outlined in the book, and is absolutely fascinating).

Now, as for achieving his goal of educating the masses on the historicity of the bible, its reliability, and its truth, this book gives a recipe for success that everyone can, with some study, (but not much more than what a child would need to learn), I would say this is successfully achieved.

My only criticism of this book is that its title is a bit too textbookish-sounding that may turn off readers from its wonderful content. I don't know what title would suffice instead, but I'm sure the author has spent much time on the title, and it is perfect for its purpose.
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