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The Exmoor Files: How I Lost A Husband And Found Rural Bliss Hardcover – 6 Aug 2009

3.9 out of 5 stars 81 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Orion; Reprint edition (6 Aug. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297854437
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297854432
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 2.4 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 98,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

As an example of 'the truth about country life' genre, her book is brightly written and often funny (Christopher Hart THE SUNDAY TIMES)

Jones is a brilliant, witty writer (Amber Cowan LONDON LITE)

there lies a sort of steely courage: of a woman facing the process of ageing and mortality on her own, as best she can (Jane Shilling DAILY MAIL)

squirm-inducing, savagely funny.. you end up admiring her determined efforts to be happy, despite everything (Claire Allfree METRO)

Finding new friends, ruminating on her mistakes, looking back on a life of shopping and media-hugging, Jones finds a kind of solace in the bleak moors of Somerset (Marla Jones CATHOLIC HERALD)

a great tale and so very well told (Paul Blezard THE LADY)

Book Description

Moving from Islington to Exmoor; one small step for mankind but a very large one for MAIL ON SUNDAY columnist Liz Jones.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I bought this book as I like Exmoor,dogs,cats,horses and country life.Have to say Liz Jones is probably the most annoying author I have ever read!!! She moans constantly about everything and everyone. I cant believe that someone so anti the ways of the country moves to the heart of hunting and farming country.Her frequent name dropping whether it be celebrities or clothing brands really are unbelievable, who cares what designer label jumper she is wearing or her cats are sleeping on.Equally annoying is the way she cannot just mention her car I dont think anyone is impressed that its a BMW!!!!!!!!!!!!! Liz then seems amazed that she has earned her self the title of most hated woman on Exmoor after being unpleasant to and about the locals and their way of life. Far too many ridiculous references to amimal "cruelty" like shoeing horses is cruel as are bits in thier mouths,feeding hay from haynets,saddles,picking cats up etc etc.The best thing she can do is move back to London
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Format: Hardcover
When I picked this book up I thought it might be an amusing rural equivalent of Bridget Jones' Diary, instead it is pages of her whinging about her ex-husband and how awful life in the countryside is. This tedium would be hard enough to endure, without the trotting out of dated rural stereotypes - if Ms Jones had written about any other minority group in such an unfair and untruthful manner then it wouldn't have been published. Rural folk obviously don't get the same courtesy.

If it were possible I wouldn't have awarded this any stars at all. This book is one to avoid at all costs, tedious moaning and blatant untruths about modern rural life.
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Format: Paperback
Far too much name dropping and information about expensive alternative horse care.

Having read Liz's column in The Mail On Sunday over the past few years, I did not feel this book contained a great deal of new material, and yes, the ex husband does get mentioned a lot (he is in the book's title after all).

Not a 'feel good' book, in fact towards the end I was desperately hoping to read that she had decided to move back to London, as her constant negativity and mounting financial problems became quite depressing.
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By Angel Jem VINE VOICE on 6 July 2010
Format: Paperback
If you are going to move to the country and find nothing better to do than to skit everyone in a weekly newspaper column, caring for cute kittens and not so cute horses with an absolute idiot of a husband (ex-husband) somewhere in the vicinity so that you run up immense debts on hotels and shopping in London, because there are no decent shops in the country, then ask your self, What kind of an idiot am I? Probably just as much of an idiot as the person who buys this book. With respect, Liz Jones bores me. She has this book out to help make money when she keeps whining on about her life and debts ad nauseum in the Mail on Sunday. If Ms Jones isn't happy in the country, then why can't she move back to the Big City and leave another building free for a local who can't find a situation. Oh, I forgot; the debts. I didn't buy this book, Ms Jones, I dislike the way you have talked about your neighbours and your life for ages. Please, do me a favour, find a proper job that pays something, like a shop assistant or the nice Chanel make up lady and let the countryside go on in its own sweet way without you. My money will be better spent on a better cause. I may just give it to the NSPCC.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like Liz Jones. I read her columns and enjoyed her previous book ("How One Single Girl..."). This book, on the other hand, I found padded out and depressing in equal measure.

I read for enjoyment and relaxation not to be ranted at about the injustice of a world that uses animals instead of befriending them. Liz tells us about the plight of horses, which is very sad, and then gives us a list of charities where we can adopt a horse (this is funny since a lot of the book is taken up by how difficult/expensive/prone to keel over dead rescue horses are). It's very preachy and got on my nerves.

Here's a woman who lives in a beautiful (in reality, it is not a run down dump - it is a gorgeous manor) house in one of the most spectacularly scenic parts of England where she rescues animals. For many people, this would be fulfilling but not Liz. Suddenly, after leaving London she wants to go back and slot back into her old life. Then on her trips back into London, she wants to be in Exmoor again.

I know she's a bit eccentric and I enjoy a good moan now and again but this was just a depressing collection of "sketches" that all have a tone of "woe is me". The tone of the book would be easier to believe if she wasn't sitting wrapped in designer cashmire on her designer couch typing it on her expensive laptop while her gardener and friend Nic took care of the animals, house and garden.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Most of us Londoners, on a cold, grey day, or when the tube breaks down in sweltering heat, occasionally fantasise about moving to the country, where the air is fresher and the pace of life less hectic. But most of us stop at occasional fantasies, realising the difficulties in terms of jobs, acquiring new practical skills, money, etc etc. Liz Jones didn't. When her four-year marriage to Nirpal Singh Dhaliwal (tirades against whom fill the book) ended, she decided on a total life change. She bought a rescue racehorse called Lizzie, and in a great hurry (Lizzie was too difficult to put in livery for long, and it was too costly) sold up her Georgian townhouse and - via a major property firm - set out to search for a country home for them. Because she wanted Lizzie to have a lot of space, she would only look at properties with a great deal of land - which limited her region-wise. Nevertheless, her firm found her a Victorian farm on the edge of Exmoor National Park, and Jones duly moved. Whether or not she didn't have time to do a proper survey, or whether she was so desperate to move fast that she didn't investigate the property or the survey in detail I'm not sure - but for whatever reason, on arriving in her new home, she became convinced she'd made a big mistake, that she was living in a 'ruin', that she should have stayed in London. Nevertheless, she stuck it out in Exmoor and with her menagerie - her four cats, Lizzie, two other horses bought 'in case Lizzie gets lonely', Michael the rescue collie (who she found abandoned by the roadside) and various chickens and sheep acquired from local farmers, she tried to make her mark. It wasn't easy.Read more ›
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