Buy Used
£3.36
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Excel 97 Annoyances (A Nutshell handbook) Paperback – 11 Sep 1997

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.03 £0.57
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (11 Sept. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 156592309X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565923096
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,473,692 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Woody Leonhard's books include Windows 3.1 Programming for Mere Mortals, The Underground Guide to Word for Windows, The Hacker's Guide to Word for Windows, The Mother of All PC Books, The Mother of All Windows 95 Books, and several others. He was series editor for Addison-Wesley's Underground Guides (11 books) and A-W's Hacker's Guides (4 books). Along with T.J. Lee and Lee Hudspeth he's editor-in-chief of PC Computing's Undocumented Office, a monthly hardcopy newsletter. He's a contributing editor at PC Computing (circulation 1,000,000+), and productivity editor for Office Computing (circulation 400,000), a new monthly magazine from the editors of PC Computing. He also publishes a free weekly electronic news bulletin on Microsoft Office called WOW (Woody's Office Watch), available by sending email to wow@wopr.com. Woody's software company makes WOPR (Woody's Office POWER Pack), the number-one enhancement to Microsoft Office. A self-described "grizzled computer hack, frustrated novelist and Office victim," by day he's a Tibetan human rights activist and co-founder of the Tibetan Children's Fund. Woody lives on top of a mountain in Coal Creek Canyon, Colorado. Lee Hudspeth is a co-founder of PRIME Consulting Group, Inc. (Hermosa Beach, CA), a Microsoft Solution Provider. His background is in operations research, financial analysis, and marketing analysis (formerly with Unocal Corp.). He has coauthored several books on Office, including The Underground Guide to Microsoft Office, OLE, and VBA and The Underground Guide to Excel 5.0 for Windows. He is co-editor-in-chief of the monthly newsletter Woody's Underground Office. He's a Microsoft MVP (Most Valued Professional), coauthor of the Microsoft course on application development using WordBasic, and a certified Microsoft trainer in Visual Basic and WordBasic. Along with other PRIME Consulting staff, Lee has developed innumerable lines of VB, VBA, and WordBasic code for the firm's numerous Office add-ins (PRIME for Excel and PRIME for Word), going way back to Word 2.0. Lee also writes and delivers Office usage and development custom courses to hordes of interested parties the world over. T.J. Lee, also a co-founder of PRIME Consulting Group, has a background as a certified public accountant and has done computer and management consulting for years. He has coauthored several books on Office, including The Underground Guide to Microsoft Excel 5 and The Underground Guide to Microsoft Office, OLE and VBA. T.J. is co-editor-in-chief of the monthly newsletter Woody's Underground Office and a certified Microsoft trainer. He has written countless courseware packages and manuals, coauthored the Microsoft Education Services course on Developing Applications in Word, and taught and lectured for thousands of developers and end users.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 11 July 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is useful in describing many odds and ends of using EXCEL. This book is not an overall introduction, like Running Microsoft EXCEL 97, nor a series of examples, like EXCEL for Scientists and Engineers. Rather, it is a helpful handholder to assist you in setting up the program and operating it to suit yourself. Like its companion volume, WORD 97 Annoyances, the theme of the book is to put VBA to use in customizing the program to your own tastes. However, the main love of the authors is WORD, and there are fewer VBA fixes in this book than in the WORD 97 book. There also are large scale repetitions of whole sections of the WORD book in this book.
Nonetheless there are a number of useful examples of using VBA in EXCEL, of setting up menus and rearranging toolbars etc. There also are some good points about spreadsheet organization, checking for spreadsheet errors, and precautions to be taken against crashes, viruses, and misuse of macros.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
In 1995 I read a book entitled "The Underground Guide to Excel 5.0" by Lee Hudspeth and T.J. Lee. I read it from cover to cover. Since then I have been searching for more from these guy and I finally found it in "Excel 97 Annoyances." Unlike most computer books, which are rehashes of the user manual, "Excel 97 Annoyances" has "soul." It is a funny, irreverent, critical look at Excel. This is a unique book, full of useful tips and techniques. Read it and you'll have more fun learning about Excel than you ever could have imagined.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is much like Excel: Brilliant at times and well...annoying at others because it doesn't live up to its potential. Since the authors intent is not to provide an in-depth discussion of all the major features of Excel, beginning users should skip this book. Power spreadsheet users will benefit, but can get the same information from other books that can double as reference sources as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9762ca44) out of 5 stars 5 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x96ff74f8) out of 5 stars Lots of Tips 11 July 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is useful in describing many odds and ends of using EXCEL. This book is not an overall introduction, like Running Microsoft EXCEL 97, nor a series of examples, like EXCEL for Scientists and Engineers. Rather, it is a helpful handholder to assist you in setting up the program and operating it to suit yourself. Like its companion volume, WORD 97 Annoyances, the theme of the book is to put VBA to use in customizing the program to your own tastes. However, the main love of the authors is WORD, and there are fewer VBA fixes in this book than in the WORD 97 book. There also are large scale repetitions of whole sections of the WORD book in this book.
Nonetheless there are a number of useful examples of using VBA in EXCEL, of setting up menus and rearranging toolbars etc. There also are some good points about spreadsheet organization, checking for spreadsheet errors, and precautions to be taken against crashes, viruses, and misuse of macros.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97d98144) out of 5 stars Not the standard set by Word Annoyances 14 July 1998
By johare4 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The idea is the same as WORD Annoyances--to provide VBA workarounds to tailor operation to your own tastes. However, not nearly as many workarounds are provided as in the WORD Annoyances book. Also, large sections are copied verbatim. For example, the introductory VBA examples are the same as WORD Annoyances, although there are a few EXCEL specific VBA programs as well. The discussion of worksheet auditing (tracking down mistakes in entries) and organization of worksheets inside a workbook is better than most.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x98242020) out of 5 stars Best Excel book I have read; funny, critical, informative. 21 May 1998
By Arthur_Jenkins@msn.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In 1995 I read a book entitled "The Underground Guide to Excel 5.0" by Lee Hudspeth and T.J. Lee. I read it from cover to cover. Since then I have been searching for more from these guy and I finally found it in "Excel 97 Annoyances." Unlike most computer books, which are rehashes of the user manual, "Excel 97 Annoyances" has "soul." It is a funny, irreverent, critical look at Excel. This is a unique book, full of useful tips and techniques. Read it and you'll have more fun learning about Excel than you ever could have imagined.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x981b8e70) out of 5 stars Brilliant at times and well...annoying at others 5 Mar. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is much like Excel: Brilliant at times and well...annoying at others because it doesn't live up to its potential. Since the authors intent is not to provide an in-depth discussion of all the major features of Excel, beginning users should skip this book. Power spreadsheet users will benefit, but can get the same information from other books that can double as reference sources as well.
5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97dcada4) out of 5 stars Somebody give these authors a towel to cry on!!! 16 Feb. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
50 pages into this book I shut it for good. After reading 8 consecutive pages of whining about what toolbars/buttons/menu items should really be called, I decided that this book wasn't what i thought it would be. I wanted a quick striking, problem solving, excel book that left out the "if we were microsoft, we would have done it this way" jargon that is usually brought on thick by these advanced excel books. Oh well, maybe for you, not for me....
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback