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Everyday [DVD]

3.3 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: John Simm, Shirley Henderson, Stephanie Kirk
  • Directors: Michael Winterbottom
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: None
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Soda Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Mar. 2013
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00A6F1QES
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 78,438 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

This potent film from Michael Winterbottom (The Trip, 24 Hour Party People, A Cock and Bull Story) is a story of survival and love, a celebration of the small pleasures of everyday life. The father Ian (John Simm - Life On Mars, Doctor Who) is in prison. The mother Karen (Shirley Henderson - The Gruffalo, Meek's Cutoff) has to bring up a family of four children by herself.

Filmed over a period of five years, Everyday uses the repetitions and rhythms of everyday life to explore how a family can survive a prolonged period apart. The story unfolds in a series of visits: first the family visiting the father in prison, later the father visiting the family at home. With each visit the distance between the children and their father becomes harder to bridge.

By avoiding the normal cinematic conventions of time passing, Everyday focuses on the small subtle changes as people grow up and grow old whilst being apart.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A spoiler-free review:

I was lucky enough to get a ticket to the première of this film before it aired on Channel 4 last week, and have been hoping that it would be released on DVD. As a cinema feature it was almost overwhelming - on television, it was almost harrowingly intimate, and almost like a docudrama in feel.

As the previous reviewer noted, 'Everyday' really does benefit from having been filmed over five real years - everyone ages and whilst the most notable changes are in the children (the youngest was in nappies when filming began and at school when it finished!)the passing of time is also reflected in the two adult leads - Shirley Henderson stops looking quite so much like a teenager who could almost be an older sibling and more like a lonely and careworn mother; John Simm's hair gets greyer and his face more angular. That the four children were real-life siblings and the filming done in their own home really lends the whole thing such a natural feel that you instantly accept them as a family, and although none of the children had acted before they behave naturally with Shirley as their mum Karen. They also behave with natural shyness and wariness around John's character Ian when they go to visit him in prison (three real prisons were used in filming and many of the extras were real prisoners, the warders real prison employees)and the stilted conversation on both sides just feels so real it makes you want to cry for them all. Ian may not have a lot to say in prison, but his utter desolation as he realises that he is missing his children growing up is always there in every long-distance phone call, every too-short visit, bubbling quietly and desperately under the surface.
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Format: DVD
The film appears to have been shot in Lincolnshire and Norfolk, much in the Stamford area, and focuses on one family over five years, as they wait for the father to be released from prison. This is not one of those depressing `true life' stories, but is a non-judgemental documentary style piece about a family living with an edge of expectation of what's round the corner, with real life pending for the moment. The film benefits from being shot over five years, as there are no changes of actors as the children age. John Simm and Shirley Henderson are completely believable ordinary parents, and the natural performances of the children, who are real-life siblings, help create the documentary feel.
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English screenwriter, producer and director Michael Winterbottom`s nineteenth feature film which he co-wrote with French screenwriter Laurence Coriat, premiered in the Shows section at the 39th Telluride Film Festival in 2012, was screened in the Masters section at the 37th Toronto International Film Festival in 2012, was shot on location in Norfolk, England over a period of five years and is a United Kingdom production which was produced by producer Melissa Parmenter. It tells the story about a woman named Karen who lives in a house in a rural county in the East of England with her sons named Shaun and Robert and daughters named Stephanie and Katrina. Karen`s husband named Ian whom she and his children are waiting to get back home has been in prison for several years and is serving his sentence.

Distinctly and finely directed by UK filmmaker Michael Winterbottom, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated from the mother, father and children`s viewpoints, draws a tangible and intimate portrayal of four children who are missing their father and a hard working mother whom is struggling to hold her family together whilst regularly visiting her man who is incarcerated. While notable for its naturalistic milieu depictions, sterling cinematography by cinematographers James Clarke, Sean Bobbitt, Marcel Zyskind, Simon Tindall and Anne Marie Lean Vercoe, use of sound and realism, this narrative-driven story where the continuity is created by repetitions and abrupt editing depicts two interrelated studies of character and contains a great score by English composer Michael Nyman.
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Winterbottom's films are always semi-documentaries and this is no exception. Shot in real time over five years, it tells the story of one family whose father is in prison, serving a five-year prison sentence. We see the family make the journey to visit him in prison and the struggle to maintain intimacy with his wife and children during that time. Brilliantly cast and acted, it is a very moving and realistic portrayal of a family struggling to stay together under difficult circumstances.
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Format: DVD
I am a huge fan of John Simm and I try to catch up with his work all the way from Greece (where I live) by buying the odd DVD. I came across Everyday and wasn't really sure that it would be my cup of tea. I had the impression it would be depressing, if anything. In the end, I gave it a try and I am delighted that I did. The film was anything BUT depressing. To start with, the fact that it was filmed over a number of years, added to the believability factor of this amazing family story, watching as the children grew up over time. It was an amazing trick by the creators that by the end of the movie, made the spectator feel like part of the family too. And how can you not feel involved? Filmed in a 'fly on the wall documentary' kind of way, with the camera work making it look like a home movie in other places, you couldn't help but get reeled in, mesmerized. During intimate scenes, it almost felt like voyerism between two real people; I was THAT involved in this incredibly realistic and moving family tale. I can't think of another movie that ever made me feel so emotionally involved. For one, I laughed and went 'aawww' to watch the kiddies during their antiques or silly emotional moments. But most of all, I felt appalled at the inhumane prison system that won't grant a couple some intimacy over the years. No matter the crime, surely, one should not deprive two people who have children and a home together this sacred right. In this sense, whatever can follow as a result to real people's lives out there is of no surprise at all. I think if anything, the film's mission was to highlight that and the unfair impact this can have on people's lives. This movie left me with a plelthora of feelings but most of all, it left me with the feelings of joy and relief that this family, somehow, made it.Read more ›
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