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Every Step of the Way by [Domino, Kit]
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Every Step of the Way Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1590 KB
  • Print Length: 266 pages
  • Publisher: ThornBerry Publishing UK; 1 edition (13 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007ST58CG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #394,562 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Despite the bluebell wood (painted by the author-artist)on the cover, this is no walk in the park. We are in the early 50s, a time of austerity for all families including Beth Brixham's. Her mother takes in washing to make ends meet, a brother is on National Service and her Dad Alfie is plagued by a war-wound that's more than skin deep. In the great London smog, Beth misses a job interview and instead ends up meeting and going out with good-looking Terry Gibbs. But her good fortune doesn't last. After a series of disasters, the Brixhams move to the country. When Beth eventually moves back to London, Terry has disappeared and she carries with her new responsibilities: it looks unlikely that they'll ever get back together.

There are two really striking things abut this book. One is the brilliant depiction of early 50s culture, complete with quiffs, drainpipes and juke-boxes, set against the moral as well as economic austerity of the post-war years. The other is the spirited and engaging heroine who for much of the book is alone against the world. I admit one or two things about the plot didn't quite ring true to me, but I was rooting for Beth from page one and could not have left without knowing the outcome of her dramatic story. It's no surprise that this book just missed the Harry Bowling Prize for a novel set in London and if you fancy a warm-hearted read and a touch of nostalgia this is for you.

AliB
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Format: Kindle Edition
Kit Domino conveys the setting of early 1950s London with such intensity, I was almost coughing along with the characters as they endured the effects of the Great Smog. There are plot twists which I didn't see coming and the characters are wonderfully drawn. In today's world, where women have made such huge strides toward independence and equality, it's good to be reminded of the struggles our sisters once faced. My heart squeezed for Beth who fought so hard to gain her independence, even as she battled the harsh realities and social expectations women faced in 1950s Britain. I really loved this story and look forward to reading more from this author.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can well understand why this book was short listed for the Harry Bowling Prize, it is a thoroughly good read. We follow the story of Beth, a young girl growing up in 1950s London who dreams of her future - a secretarial job, love and eventually marriage. However fate has something entirely different in store for her. We follow Beth's highs and lows, her happiness and disappointments - a real roller coaster ride - (I'm not intending to give any of the plot away) and realise that if she had ended up with the future she originally planned she would not have become the young woman we see at the end of the book. Written against the backdrop of an England emerging from the Second World War, of young people trying to find their own identity through music and fashion it was a great read and one I would definitely recommend.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Every Step Of The Way is an amazing story, it transports you back into the 1950's with ease and a realism that is at times quite harsh. From the thick, pea-soup fog, to the way young women had to fight to retain their own identity; it's a piece of social history in the telling. Your heart will go out to Beth as she struggles to hold things together, the victim of a set of circumstances that are almost impossible to imagine. At times graphic, at times making you feel angry as you accompany her, you find yourself willing her on to fight those battles. It is easy to see why this story was shortlisted for the Harry Bowling prize! You turn the last page thinking `and what came next..' - I'm waiting for the sequel - there has to be one! A pleasure to read, it leaves a lasting impression...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This novel, set in London and Gloucestershire in the aftermath of WWII, gave me a real sense of what life was like in the 1950's, when rationing was still in place and the women who had kept the country going in the fields and in the factories during wartime, were all back at the kitchen sink. It must have been a difficult time for teenagers to grow up in and Kit Domino captures the essence of the 1950's era exceptionally well. The depiction of the London smog and its effects on the population is particularly harrowing and poignant and this is where this story begins. We follow the life of Beth, a sixteen year old girl living in 1950's London, who through experiencing love, life and loss, becomes a grown woman by the end of the novel. It's a coming of age story that is beautifully written, expertly told, and one I simply couldn't put down. Highly recommended.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As I grow older I do tend to think more about my 1950s childhood. This book transported me back to this time, although I am glad I did not live in these unbelievable hard conditions. I enjoyed reading it immensely, but as when you watch a 'disaster movie', part of the pleasure is knowing, much as you might empathise with the characters, that you are not there. It makes you appreciate what you have; it also gives short shrift to anyone who may regard the 1950s through rose-tinted spectacles!
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By Lincs Reader TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback
Beth Brixham is a 16-year-old London girl. It's 1952 and the city is beginning to recover from the War. Beth is desperately looking for an office job, something that will please her parents and allow her a little more freedom and independence, away from her bullish, somewhat overbearing Father and her overworked and tired Mother. Beth is making her way to an interview when she becomes lost in a terrible 'pea-souper' of a fog, a fog like nothing ever seen before in London which becomes known as the 'Great Smog'. Beth takes refuge in a cafe, and gets talking to the staff and owner who offers her a job there and then. Working in a cafe is not what Beth had hoped for, but once there, she soon starts to enjoy her days.

Eventually, after four days the smog cleared and the aftermath for the city is huge. Thousands of people have died and lives have been changed forever. The aftermath for Beth is that instead of getting an office job, she is now a waitress - but has met the handsome and charming Terry who has quickly stolen her heart.

Life deals Beth and her family a really hard hand. As she encounters tragedy and disappointment her character's strength shines through. Kit Domino paints a wonderfully evocative picture of life in the 1950s, of the newly emerging coffee shop culture, the music and the fashion. Throughout the story, as Beth deals with the pain and grief around her, she never weakens. Sometimes she may make the wrong decisions in life, but always for the right reasons. Beth is loyal and devoted to her family, despite her Father's treatment of her and her siblings, and indeed, his own wife. She is also determined to fight for her rights as a woman, often going against the wishes of others, to make sure that she as a woman can have the same opportunities as the men.
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