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Every Second Counts by [Armstrong, Lance]
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Every Second Counts Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Length: 258 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

Amazon.co.uk Review

In the opening of Lance Armstrong's memoir, Every Second Counts (coauthored by Sally Jenkins), he reflects: "Generally, one of the hardest things in the world to do is something twice." While he is talking here about his preparation for what would prove to be his second consecutive Tour de France victory in 2000, the sentiment could equally be applied to the book itself. And just as Armstrong managed to repeat his incredible 1999 tour victory, Every Second Counts repeats--and, in some ways exceeds—the success of his bestselling first memoir, It's Not About the Bike.

Every Second Counts confronts the challenge of moving beyond his cancer experience, his first Tour victory and his celebrity status. Few of Armstrong's readers will ever compete in the Tour de France (though cyclists will relish Armstrong's detailed recounting of his 2000-2003 tour victories), but all will relate to his discussions of loss and disappointment in his personal and professional life since 1999. They will relate to his battles with petty bureaucracies, such as the French court system during the doping scandal that almost halted his career. And they will especially relate to constant struggles with work/life balance.

In the face of September 11--which arrives halfway through the narrative (just before the fifth anniversary of his diagnosis)--Armstrong draws from his experiences to show that suffering, fear and death are the essential human condition. In so openly using his own life to illustrate how to face this reality, he proves that he truly is a hero--and not just because of the bike. In Every Second Counts he is to be admired as a human being, a man who sees every day as a challenge to live richly and well, no matter what hardships may come. --Patrick O'Kelley, Amazon.com

Amazon Review

In the opening of Lance Armstrong's memoir, Every Second Counts (coauthored by Sally Jenkins), he reflects: "Generally, one of the hardest things in the world to do is something twice." While he is talking here about his preparation for what would prove to be his second consecutive Tour de France victory in 2000, the sentiment could equally be applied to the book itself. And just as Armstrong managed to repeat his incredible 1999 tour victory, Every Second Counts repeats--and, in some ways exceeds—the success of his bestselling first memoir, It's Not About the Bike.

Every Second Counts confronts the challenge of moving beyond his cancer experience, his first Tour victory and his celebrity status. Few of Armstrong's readers will ever compete in the Tour de France (though cyclists will relish Armstrong's detailed recounting of his 2000-2003 tour victories), but all will relate to his discussions of loss and disappointment in his personal and professional life since 1999. They will relate to his battles with petty bureaucracies, such as the French court system during the doping scandal that almost halted his career. And they will especially relate to constant struggles with work/life balance.

In the face of September 11--which arrives halfway through the narrative (just before the fifth anniversary of his diagnosis)--Armstrong draws from his experiences to show that suffering, fear and death are the essential human condition. In so openly using his own life to illustrate how to face this reality, he proves that he truly is a hero--and not just because of the bike. In Every Second Counts he is to be admired as a human being, a man who sees every day as a challenge to live richly and well, no matter what hardships may come. --Patrick O'Kelley, Amazon.com


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 771 KB
  • Print Length: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital; New Ed edition (30 Mar. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003ELY7ME
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #309,951 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Why did I buy this book? Well I guess because as I live in France I have come to appreciate the Tour de France. Living in the UK I used to think bike racing was dull as a television experience, I mean watching a load of blokes cycle what's the interest in that? What you come to appreciate about the Tour is that its a chess game on wheels, a test of one man's will over another, its about tactics and its about slogging your guts up, white your legs are aching up a very steep hill. Now if you watch the Tour de France you can't help but notice Lance Armstrong, to start with, he keeps winning it. So when I saw this book at the airport I bought it, because I wanted to understand more about the person who the French have a real love/hate relationship with. I mean why would they boo a guy who has survived cancer and moreover created a foundation to help other people.
What I learnt was that this is not an easy guy to deal with, he is so obsessive about winning the tour he studies how to take milliseconds off time and takes enjoyment from cycling up mountains twice. I also learnt a bit around the cancer story (which I was not really aware of) and how some of the self determination and will to win comes from that experience.
The writing style is odd, it reads like a blog or if Lance is reading into a tape thoughts on his mind, so I wonder what the relationship is between him and the co-author. In fact the writing style and the short length of the book were the negative points for me. I somehow felt there might be more he could share but then again I guess this is his style, so if you are looking for a great piece of writing you've come to the wrong place. Its also not really an explanation of the cancer experience (I guess thats in the first volume).
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Format: Hardcover
I idolise the man, read his brilliant first book countless times, bought my copy of this as soon as it hit the shelves, read it straight through that evening.... and felt nothing.
A life story should be told once. The charm of 'It's not about the bike' was in Lance's description of his childhood, his diagnosis, his treatment and recovery and his marriage etc. An insight into the man that came straight from the horse's mouth (almost..) and served to give some idea of what makes him tick.
Don't get me wrong, there's nothing terrible about this book, but there's also nothing raw. It might as well be a collection of exerpts from every magazine article he's given, bigging up all his team mates etc. in a way that really reflects his recent, more guarded nature.
Understandably the man wants more privacy, but that's a good enough reason not to write a second book at all.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book on holiday whilst lazing by the pool in sunny Spain. I was once very athletic but middle age has taken a grip and now I am overweight and get out of breath just running up stairs. The lesson in this book is not to take life for granted. Lance Armstrong says he is happier to have had cancer (and recovered) than to have won the Tour de France. This is because it has given him perspective. He is obviously a driven singleminded character and we can't all have that trait. But inspired by the book I rose from my poolside lounger and swam fifty lengths of the pool. Since my holiday I have exercised everyday, changed my diet and am determined to make "every second count" The book also gives great detail about the workings of the Tour de France and the camaraderie in the team
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Format: Paperback
Having read "its not about the bike" I was compelled to obtain "every second counts" as quickly as possible. This book enables even the most ignorant spectator of cycle racing and the Tour de France in particular to appreciate how much more is involved in this sport than the pedalling of the routes of France we see on television. The details Lance Armstrong provides brings both the race and the figures in the peleton to life.
However, much deeper than the insight into this famous race, is the appreciation the reader is able to experience of a very human man with very human failings but incredible strength of purpose and character. He leaves you with the determination to make all your own seconds count.
These books had a profound impact on me and I feel grateful to have been able to read them.
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By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 July 2004
Format: Paperback
Every Second Counts brings us up-to-date on what happened to Lance Armstrong after he survived testicular cancer and went back to competitive cycling to win the Tour de France. If you have been away in another galaxy, he has since fathered three children (a son and twin daughters) using sperm saved from before his cancer treatments, won four more Tour de France races, become a world-renowned celebrity, been investigated for and cleared of "doping" his body, stayed clean from cancer, become a noted cancer advocate and developed a rocky patch in his marriage.
Every Second Counts is a rambling account of all this that sometimes comes across as having been dictated into a tape recorder during a long descent on a bicycle.
The book will be of most interest to those who want to know what it's like to recover from a potentially fatal cancer, live as a celebrity, try to balance a personal life with a demanding career and how Mr. Armstrong won all those Tour de France races.
Both his natural personality and his escape from death make Mr. Armstrong treasure every minute . . . and he likes to take life at full speed in demanding conditions. If he's not training endlessly, he's driving his car too fast or taking dangerous leaps into a rocky pool. At the same time, he's trying to temper that instinct with a desire to see his children grow up and have a good marriage. The book candidly explains how his retirement from racing will be required to help bring his life into a more helpful balance for his family. But he's not ready to do that just yet.
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