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Every Day Hardcover – 28 Aug 2012

4.4 out of 5 stars 118 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 324 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (28 Aug. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307931889
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307931887
  • Product Dimensions: 14.9 x 2.9 x 21.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (118 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 716,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Starred Review, Booklist, July 1, 2012:
"Levithan has created an irresistible premise that is sure to captivate readers....
["Every Day"] is a study in style, an exercise in imagination, and an opportunity for readers themselves to occupy another life: that of A, himself."

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
"An awe-inspiring, thought-provoking reminder that love reaches beyond physical appearances or gender."

Entertainment Weekly, August 22, 2012:
"Levithan keeps the pages turning not only with ingenious twists on his central conceit but with A's hard-earned pieces of wisdom about identity, isolation, and love. He clearly understands the profound effect that fun, thoughtful literature can have on young people. "Every Day" has the power to teach a bully empathy by answering an essential question: What's it like to be you and not me -- even if it's just for one day?"

New York Times Book Review, August 26, 2012:
"It demonstrates Levithan's talent for empathy, which is paired in the best parts of the book with a persuasive optimism about the odds for happiness and for true love."

Starred Review, School Library Journal, September 2012:
."..every step of the narrative feels real and will elicit a strong emotional response from readers and offer them plenty of fodder for speculation, especially regarding the nature of love."

Starred Review, Booklist, July 1, 2012:
"Levithan has created an irresistible premise that is sure to captivate readers....
["Every Day"] is a study in style, an exercise in imagination, and an opportunity for readers themselves to occupy another life: that of A, himself."

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
"An awe-inspiring, thought-provoking reminder that love reaches beyond physical appearances or gender."

Letter Blocks, the BN Parents & Educators blog, August 23, 2012:
"A definite crowd-pleaser."

The L Magazine, August 29, 2012:
"The premise allows for stimulating parallels: A's experience is both like the writer's, who inhabits the consciousnesses of random characters, and the adolescent's, who tries on myriad identities."

Entertainment Weekly, August 22, 2012:
"Rich in wisdom and wit...Levithan keeps the pages turning not only with ingenious twists on his central conceit but with A's hard-earned pieces of wisdom about identity, isolation, and love." Every Day" has the power to teach a bully empathy by answering an essential question: What's it like to be you and not me -- even if it's just for one day?"
New York Times Book Review, August 26, 2012:
"It demonstrates Levithan's talent for empathy, which is paired in the best parts of the book with a persuasive optimism about the odds for happiness and for true love."
Los Angeles Times, September 2, 2012:
"It's the rare book that challenges gender presumptions in a way that's as entertaining as it is unexpected and, perhaps most important, that's relatable to teens who may not think they need sensitivity training when it comes to sexual orientation and the nature of true love. 'Every Day' is precisely such a book...A story that is always alluring, oftentimes humorous and much like love itself -- splendorous."
MTV Hollywood Crush, September 28, 2012:
"Thoughtful and fascinating...A study in the most real and human of concerns: the importance of empathy, the value of friends and family, and the beauty of permanence that we have the luxury of taking for granted."
Starred Review, School Library Journal, September 2012:
..".every step of the narrative feels real and will elicit a strong emotional response from readers and offer them plenty of fodder for speculation, especially regarding the nature of love."
Starred Review, Booklist, July 1, 2012:
"Levithan has created an irresistible premise that is sure to captivate readers....
["Every Day"] is a study in style, an exercise in imagination, and an opportunity for readers themselves to occupy another life: that of A, himself."
Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
"An awe-inspiring, thought-provoking reminder tha

"Fresh, unique, funny, and achingly honest, Levithan brilliantly explores the adolescent conundrum of not feeling like oneself, and not knowing where one belongs. I didn't just read this book -- I inhaled it." --Jodi Picoult, NYT bestselling author of "Lone Wolf" and "Between the Lines"
Entertainment Weekly, August 22, 2012:
"Rich in wisdom and wit...Levithan keeps the pages turning not only with ingenious twists on his central conceit but with A's hard-earned pieces of wisdom about identity, isolation, and love." Every Day" has the power to teach a bully empathy by answering an essential question: What's it like to be you and not me -- even if it's just for one day?"
New York Times Book Review, August 26, 2012:
"It demonstrates Levithan's talent for empathy, which is paired in the best parts of the book with a persuasive optimism about the odds for happiness and for true love."
Los Angeles Times, September 2, 2012:
"It's the rare book that challenges gender presumptions in a way that's as entertaining as it is unexpected and, perhaps most important, that's relatable to teens who may not think they need sensitivity training when it comes to sexual orientation and the nature of true love. 'Every Day' is precisely such a book...A story that is always alluring, oftentimes humorous and much like love itself -- splendorous."
MTV Hollywood Crush, September 28, 2012:
"Thoughtful and fascinating...A study in the most real and human of concerns: the importance of empathy, the value of friends and family, and the beauty of permanence that we have the luxury of taking for granted."
Boston Globe, September 15, 2012:
"Ambitious and provocative...we're not ready to let A go."
OUT Magazine, December 2012:
"One of the most inventive young adult novels of the year."
Romantic Times, October 2012:
"Levithan is a literary genius. His style of writing is brilliant -- practically flawless... Reading A's journe

School Library Journal Best of Children's Books 2012
Kirkus Reviews Best of Teen's Books 2012
Booklist Best of Children's Books 2012
"Fresh, unique, funny, and achingly honest, Levithan brilliantly explores the adolescent conundrum of not feeling like oneself, and not knowing where one belongs. I didn't just read this book I inhaled it." Jodi Picoult, NYT bestselling author of "Lone Wolf" and "Between the Lines"
Entertainment Weekly, August 22, 2012:
"Rich in wisdom and wit...Levithan keeps the pages turning not only with ingenious twists on his central conceit but with A's hard-earned pieces of wisdom about identity, isolation, and love." Every Day" has the power to teach a bully empathy by answering an essential question: What's it like to be you and not me even if it's just for one day?"
New York Times Book Review, August 26, 2012:
"It demonstrates Levithan's talent for empathy, which is paired in the best parts of the book with a persuasive optimism about the odds for happiness and for true love."
Los Angeles Times, September 2, 2012:
"It's the rare book that challenges gender presumptions in a way that's as entertaining as it is unexpected and, perhaps most important, that's relatable to teens who may not think they need sensitivity training when it comes to sexual orientation and the nature of true love. Every Day' is precisely such a book...A story that is always alluring, oftentimes humorous and much like love itself splendorous."
MTV Hollywood Crush, September 28, 2012:
"Thoughtful and fascinating...A study in the most real and human of concerns: the importance of empathy, the value of friends and family, and the beauty of permanence that we have the luxury of taking for granted."
Boston Globe, September 15, 2012:
"Ambitious and provocative...we re not ready to let A go."
OUT Magazine, December 2012:
"One of the most inventive young adult novels of the year."
Romantic Times, October 2012:
"Levithan is a literary genius. His style of writing is brilliant practically flawless... Reading A s journey to make love last, in a world that is always changing, is an experience I hope everyone gets to share."
Starred Review, School Library Journal, September 2012:
"Every step of the narrative feels real and will elicit a strong emotional response from readers and offer them plenty of fodder for speculation, especially regarding the nature of love.
Starred Review, Booklist, July 1, 2012:
Levithan has created an irresistible premise that is sure to captivate readers .
["Every Day"] is a study in style, an exercise in imagination, and an opportunity for readers themselves to occupy another life: that of A, himself.
Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
An awe-inspiring, thought-provoking reminder that love reaches beyond physical appearances or gender.
Starred Review, Shelf Awareness, September 7, 2012:
"Levithan's unusual love story will make teens think about how the core of the soul never changes. A speaks of faith, love, dreams and death with a wisdom derived from thousands of lives visited over 16 years and firsthand proof of how much humans share rather than what sets them apart."
The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, September 2012:
"This unconventional romance considers some fascinating and unexpected questions about the nature of identity, consciousness, love, and gender...Readers will identify with A s profound longing for connection, but they ll also be intrigued by the butterfly effect A s presence may have on numerous other teens who make brief but memorable appearances."
The Horn Book, November 2012:
"Brilliantly conceived...[Levithan] shapes the narrative into a profound exploration of what it means to love someone."
Letter Blocks, the BN Parents & Educators blog, August 23, 2012:
"A definite crowd-pleaser."
The L Magazine, August 29, 2012:
"The premise allows for stimulating parallels: A s experience is both like the writer s, who inhabits the consciousnesses of random characters, and the adolescent s, who tries on myriad identities."

About the Author

DAVID LEVITHAN is a children's book editor in New York City, and the author of several books for young adults, including "Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist "and "Dash & Lily's Book of Dares" (co-authored with Rachel Cohn); "Will Grayson, Will Grayson" (co-authored with John Green); and "Every You, Every Me" (with photographs from Jonathan Farmer). He lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's been nearly two weeks since I finished reading Every Day, and I'm only just now writing my review. Normally, I write my reviews within hours, or at most 2-3 days after finishing a book, as my sieve-like memory kicks in pretty quickly. But it's taken me almost two weeks to think about how to review Every Day, and I'm still thinking about the book and how it made me feel.

Talking about A is difficult, because A doesn't have a gender, or a body. I wouldn't define A as a spirit, or a soul, but as a personality. A sweet, kind personality who does their best in a situation that's completely unimaginable - waking up in a different body every single day from birth. A respects each inhabited body by only accessing the parts of their memories and brains that allow A to function through a day as that person, to know who their parents and friends are, where to go and how to behave in a way that minimises the chances of anyone realising something is wrong.

In the beginning I didn't really 'get' why A was so attracted to Rhiannon, but as the story continued I began to really understand what was happening - after spending a lifetime with no particular attachment to anyone, A experiences an instant attraction, and not having had that experience before, does what most people do - becomes slightly obsessed with the person they have sparked with. And as the story progressed, I grew to like Rhiannon, and honestly felt quite sad for her.
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Format: Paperback
Now THAT'S how to write YA fiction!

I've not been so compelled to finish a book for some time. A truly unique idea (that requires some suspension of disbelief) and a growing love story that (maybe occasionally over the top) is sweet, honest and emotive.

'A' has spent his whole life in the strange situation of moving around from body to body every day. Each morning he awakes in a new bed. With different parents, a different face in the mirror. For one day. Then he moves on. Only into bodies of the same age. It's fascinating. It's never explained how or why.
We never even come to know if A is a boy or girl. At 16, A finds a connection with a girlfriend of his occupied body and from then on tries to see her each day, wherever and whoever he wakes up as. Can they connect? Can it work?

With unanswered questions I wondered if the book would frustrate me but not at all. I loved it. The insights A gives into becoming a blind person, an illegal immigrant, an addict, a geek, it's all pitched perfectly. As is the ending.

A wonderful read with much to chew over afterwards.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'd been meaning to read this book for a while, intrigued by the concept of A, a narrator who wakes up in a different body each day and lives their hosts' life for that day. They have no body to call their own, and therefore no sense of their sex, gender, sexuality or race. It was a very original idea and was mostly very well executed. This "entity's" voice radiated out of the page, striking a good balance between having a consistent personality and being influenced by each body their found themselves in.

There were really three things going on here. One was a sort of paranormal story, where you just enjoyed and wondered at the strangeness of A's life. I loved reading about their experiences. I'd have liked to see more explanation, more mind-bending weirdness and more attempts to bend the rules, but fundamentally, that wasn't what the author was going for.

The second aspect was a very strange love story. One day, A is in the body of a rather unpleasant boy and falls in love with his girlfriend. A then keeps trying to met her in different guises, before telling her the truth, after which they try to make their very unconventional relationship work. The concept of the romance was intriguing, but the actual relationship just didn't quite grab me. The first chapter, where the two of them meet, was super cheesy and one of the worst examples of "insta-love" I've every come across. I often don't mind that, but it jarred me here. Why this girl? There just didn't seem to be anything special about her - if anything, she seemed very ground down and unambitious.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Good:

A unique storyline, very well crafted. There were some very interesting concepts to mull over such as the fundamental likeness of every single person. Although occassionally it sounded a little preachy and forced, I was also very pleased to see A calling out homophobia and transphobia. Its also very rare for a book to hit on depression and drug abuse from the perspective of the sufferer, without being dramatic or self-indulgent. I really appreciated the role of Kelsea and the effect her mental illness had on her life.

The story was very compelling and had me really rooting for and feeling sorry for A. In a way I'm glad it wasn't a happy ending as I find happy endings to be trite and unrealistic, but I was also really hoping it would all work out for A.

The Bad:

A and Rihannon fell in love in a matter of meetings. I appreciated the idea of falling for the "inside" of someone, but on that very basis, A would have had to have known Rihannon far better/met her far more to get a real understanding of her "inside" to fall in love with her. Additionally, a lot of the the dialogue was unrealistic... It is a common literary mistake to make teenagers talk in poetry at the loss of realism. On the other hand, Levithan has an incredible way with words that lead to some truly beautiful sentences (just not when its coming out of a teenager's mouth).

Like a previous reviewer, I felt a little robbed by the Nathan/Poole storyline as towards the end it fell off into vague paraphrasing rather than giving any real action or dialogue to what would have been an intriguing element. Too much focus was on the (unrealistic) love story and less on the surrounding story.

Also, there were a fair few typos in the book which is always annoying.
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