• RRP: £16.99
  • You Save: £3.11 (18%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Essential English for Jou... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Essential English for Journalists, Editors and Writers (Pimlico) Paperback – 4 May 2000

4.4 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
Paperback
£13.88
£10.99 £3.17
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
click to open popover


Frequently bought together

  • Essential English for Journalists, Editors and Writers (Pimlico)
  • +
  • Do I Make Myself Clear?: Why Writing Well Matters
Total price: £29.87
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Pimlico; 2Rev Ed edition (4 May 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712664475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712664479
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.5 x 21.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,267 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Amazon Review

Don't write "remunerate" when you mean "pay". You should "send" not "transmit" and "help" but not "facilitate". Take care with meanings too. If you're "disinterested" you're not bored, you're impartial. "Less" is not interchangeable with "fewer" and a "principle" is different from a "principal".

Harold Evans, editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981 and then of The Times for a year, first wrote his Newsman's English and News Headlines in the 1970s. In an age of increasingly sloppy English, Evans's books acquired the status of classics with their condemnation of dangling participles and gratuitous adjective and adverbs. Now they've been edited, updated and merged into a single new volume by Crawford Gillan. The emphasis, which hasn't dated at all, is still on the need for plain muscular English which says what it has to say in as few well-chosen words as possible.

The book has at least three uses. First, it could be a text book for trainee journalists, especially given the large number of published verbose examples Evans quotes and then rewrites as demonstration pieces. Second, it has plenty of advice for experienced journalists and editors trying to write better. Third, it is full of useful advice for anyone--beyond the media--who wants to write more coherently.

Essential English certainly raises awareness. You probably won't read it without feeling obliged to double back and delete your redundancies the next time you write something. In the common expression "depreciate in value" the last two words, for instance, can go without loss of meaning. You don't need "gainful" in front of "employment" either and Evans lists dozens of other examples. And be brutal with tired expressions such as "wealth of information" or "pillar of the church", he advises. He also provides an intriguing thesaurus for headline writers in search of pithiness. For "harmonisation," try "accord", "bargain", "compact", "pact", "peace", or "truce", he says. --Susan Elkin

Review

"Demonstrates how to clear whole jungles of vagueness and verbal clutter" (Times Literary Supplement)

"Every journalist in England should read this exceptional book. Harry Evans is a master of our trade and a master of how to use the English language" (Piers Morgan)

"English is the world's most used and abused language. This book in on the side of the angels. It should become an essential textbook for every journalist" (Paul Dacre, editor of the Daily Mail)

"Harry Evans is one of the great newspaper professionals of his time, and his book should be a standard text for every journalist" (Max Hastings, Editor, Evening Standard)

"Thank God it's back in print. It has never been more necessary" (John Humphrys)

See all Product description

Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

9 March 2018
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
14 March 2018
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
17 February 2015
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
14 June 2017
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
7 November 2013
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
3 people found this helpful
|Comment|Report abuse
14 November 2014
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
7 October 2014
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase

Would you like to see more reviews about this item?

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?