• RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Pe... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Light shelf wear and minimal interior marks. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Epic of Gilgamesh (Penguin Classics) Paperback – 30 Jan 2003

4.3 out of 5 stars 44 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£3.17 £3.61
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Epic of Gilgamesh (Penguin Classics)
  • +
  • Myths from Mesopotamia Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (Oxford World's Classics)
  • +
  • Inanna
Total price: £23.00
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Rev Ed edition (30 Jan. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140449191
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140449198
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Andrew George has skillfully bridged the chasm between a scholarly re-edition and a popular work
"London Review of Books"
Humankind s first literary achievement..."Gilgamesh "should compel us as the well-spring of which we are inheritors...Andrew George provides an excellent critical and historical introduction.
Paul Binding, "Independent on Sunday"
This volume will endure as one of the milestones markers...[George] expertly and easily conducts his readers on a delightful and moving epic journey.
Samuel A. Meier, "Times Literary Supplement"
Appealingly presented and very readably translated...it still comes as an exhilarating surprise to find the actions and emotions of the Sumerian superhero coming to us with absolute immediacy over 30-odd centuries.
"Scotsman"
Andrew George has formed an English text from the best of the tablets, differentiating his complex sources but allowing the general reader a clear run at one of the first enduring stories ever told.
Peter Stothard, "The Times"
An exemplary combination of scholarship and lucidity...very impressive...invaluable as a convenient guide to all the different strands which came together to produce the work we now call "Gilgamesh."
Alan Wall, "Literary Review""

About the Author

Andrew George is Reader in Assyriology at SOAS (the School of Oriential and African Studies) in London, and is also an Honorary Lecturer at the University's Institute of Archaeology. His research has taken him many times to Iraq to visit Babylon and other ancient sites, and to museums in Baghdad, Europe and North America to read the original clay tablets on which the scribes of ancient Iraq wrote.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Penguin Classics have produced here a wonderful new edition of the Epic of Gilgamesh. A lucid translation brings the epic to life, and it is backed up by a wealth of extra material that add depth and understanding to a reading of the text. There is an extensive introduction to the historical, literary and archaeological background: the Babylonian, Akkadian and Sumerian contexts are explored clearly and succinctly, and there is also a fascinating history of how the text itself has been pieced together. In addition, and making this new edition even more worthy, the translator collects together fragments from variant traditions - some of them for the first time in English - which expand or give slightly different perspectives upon the core text. This rounds out the picture perfectly, giving an intriguing glimpse into how the story and image of Gilgamesh evolved over time and in different contexts.
Finally, the text is peppered with line drawings of contemporary tablet illustrations. All this, and pictures too! Highly recommended.
Comment 84 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If you want to read the story of Gilgamesh without worrying too much about where that story came from, then this is the book for you. Unlike the newer Penguin edition, this is a straightforward retelling of the epic in prose form, and no attempt is made to reflect the complexity of the many fragmentary versions of the text.
The story is told in six chapters, based on the Standard Version of the epic, but without following its line and verse structure. It's short and snappy and by the time you've finished you'll have seen Gilgamesh's adventures in the Forest of Cedar, in the Underworld, and at the end of the world as he is instructed by Uta-napishti, the only survivor of the Deluge. You'll see Gilgamesh progress from haughty despot to responsible ruler, as he realises that the only way to immortality is through the good works you leave behind.
This is a story of gradual realisation and painfully acquired insight which we can all relate to. Though it lacks the sure touch of the Iliad or the Odyssey, which may be due to the extremely fragmentary and disparate sources, there is a real humanity to Gilgamesh and his inner turmoil which goes to show that human nature hasn't changed that much.
It also comes with an excellent short introduction to ancient Mesopotamia and its geography, history and culture.
1 Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This whole series "Penguin Epics" consists of nothing but excerpts. What you get here is the text of the 1972 Sandars Penguin Classic without any of the introduction at the front or any of the glossary of names at the back.
Don't buy it - if you are interested in Gilgamesh, buy the complete 1972 Sandars Penguin Classic AND the 1999 Andrew George Penguin Classic. Notice that two of the reviews here are actually for Andrew George's edition - that's a big blunder by Amazon!
4 Comments 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
The Epic of Gilgamesh is a fascinating tale of great historical importance. Composed 1500 years before Homer's epics, the story is one that modern man can readily understand and appreciate. Gilgamesh was the more than capable ruler of the ancient town of Uruk; his strength and physical beauty were unmatched by any in the land, and his subjects adored him. Although he possessed so much, Gilgamesh wanted desperately to live forever like a god. He was two-thirds god and one-third human, but he refused to accept his destiny to die. If it were his lot to die, he wanted to perform great deeds so that his name would never be forgotten.
The story opens with the story of Enkidu, a wild man of nature who was to become Gilgamesh's best friend and accompany him on his dangerous journeys. The first trip takes them to the Land of the Cedars where Gilgamesh sets out to kill Humbaba, the guardian of the forest. When he later slays the Bull of Heaven, the anger of the gods is turned upon him and Enkidu, leading to new suffering by Gilgamesh. In desperation, he seeks Utnapishtim in the land of the gods; Utnapishtim was granted eternal life after preserving mankind in the wake of a great flood. Gilgamesh again finds only heartache for his troubles. Returning to Uruk, he preserves the story of his journeys and deeds in writing, and it is, perhaps ironically, in this written record that Gilgamesh is recognized today for the great man he was.
One learns much about the ancient gods in this tale, and the story of the great goddess Ishtar's role in the related events is pretty amazing. When Ishtar invited Gilgamesh to be her husband, he issued forth a litany of former lovers whom Ishtar had turned out and cursed, boldly rebuffing Ishtar's advances.
Read more ›
1 Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This translation of Gilgamesh is one of the best things I have read in a while. It takes a quite academic route to giving the reader the many goods of the epic in that the narrative is slightly broken up by sorting the information by tablet, and by not neglecting any relevant Sumerian or Akkadian version of the epic. That is to say, the reader should be aware that this is not like simply reading a book of prose; the text is verse (verse with repeating lines and ideas, as in much epic poetry, a style I find readable and enjoyable, but others can find less so) and is frequently broken by lacunae coming from the source material; and the text is divided into three major parts. Part one is the Standard Version, or He Who Saw the Deep, in 11 tablets; part two is Surpassing All Other Kings, beginning with the Pennsylvania tablet; and part three is a selection of Sumerian poems of Bilgames (the Sumerian version of the Akkadian name Gilgamesh). All parts are well translated - beautifully so, so that even the fairly frequent lacunae (it is, after all, several thousand years old) do not interrupt the understanding or enjoyment.

The introduction to the book is excellent - a brilliant summary of some general ideas about life in the time it was written in ancient Mesopotamia. The introductions to each part, tablet and poem are also lucid, helpful and personable. Even the few illustrations - copies of original pictures from Mesopotamia describing the epic - are lively and expressive. If it had been the first translation of the epic that I had read, and it assuredly is not, then it would have been a perfect introduction.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback