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The English Nation: The Great Myth Paperback – 22 Jun 2000

2.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Paperback, 22 Jun 2000
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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Sutton Publishing Ltd; New edition edition (22 Jun. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0750925191
  • ISBN-13: 978-0750925198
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 2.8 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,672,642 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Edwin Jones held a research fellowship at the University of Cambridge, before embarking on a long and successful career in education, including thirty years as a headteacher of a comprehensive school in South Wales. He lives in Swansea. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read the book twice, I still don't know what myth the author is writing about! Can anyone help me? The style is not good, far too prolix and woolly. I agree with the reviewer who pointed out needless repetitions and misspellings.
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Format: Paperback
An excellent read for the independent minded and for those who question the indoctrination of the establishment.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
v good
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Format: Paperback
I accidentally went to the end of the book and discovered a long - over 75 pages - afterword and epilogue in which the author really did claim that Blair was an honest politician. And that Blair was working to restrain Bush from unilateral action against Iraq and keep Bush working through the UN. This was published in 2003. After which the book went in the bin. A historian who regards Blair as honest - what is the point of reading the book? It is not just being that wrong but that the author has a different definition of telling the truth from most people and there is no point in reading history written by a person with this concept of truthfulness
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9602a9d8) out of 5 stars 1 review
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x96ea5b94) out of 5 stars A New Myth 1 April 2010
By Stephanie A. Mann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
(2 stars=I don't like it; 3 stars=It's okay; 4 stars=I like it)
I selected the three star rating because it balances my reaction to this book: Edwin Jones has written an excellent examination of the Whig mythology of English History first by identifying where it all began (with Thomas Cromwell's new version of English History in explanation of the acts of the "Reformation Parliament" of Henry VIII), then by tracing the legacy of that historical revision and its hold on the ordinary person in England. He analyses the historical method that supported this Whig mythology: relying on previous works without any analysis of primary sources; sustained anti-catholicism and willfull ignorance of the Medieval era; nationalistic and Protestant exceptionalism--all expressed in the works of John Foxe, Gilbert Burnet, Edward Coke, and others. During the Enlightenment era, David Hume maintained everything but the Protestant exceptionalism in his secular philosophical History of England, because he was sceptical about religion.
Jones' great hero is Father John Lingard who in the nineteenth century began to apply modern historical methods of finding primary sources and not just relying on what Cromwell, Foxe, Burnet or others said. He used primary sources obtained in England and on the Continent to reveal the true course of events previous historians had ignored. Jones finally examines the last great historians of the Whig tradition (Macaulay and Trevelyan and others) before turning to the revisionist historians writing about the English Reformation (Duffy, Scarisbrick, Haigh, etc). Their works, he notes, have not gone far beyond an academic audience to influence popular thought about the Reformation and other events.
The text even so far is marred by repetition and typographical errors: the same work by R.W. Southern is mentioned half a dozen times with no great advance in argument. Christopher Haigh's name is spelled Haig, etc.
Then the Epilogue and the Afterword are tacked on and Jones ends the book with a rant against the USA, overflowing praise of Tony Blair, and predictions of the great coming world order under the European Union.
I learned a great deal from his examination of the Whig theory of English History; I could have done without his now dated examination of the new mythology of a new world order and the greatness of the Eurodollar.
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