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England: A Guide to Post-war Listed Buildings Hardcover – 28 Apr 2003

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 752 pages
  • Publisher: Batsford Ltd; 2nd Revised edition edition (28 April 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0713488182
  • ISBN-13: 978-0713488180
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 16.2 x 4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,317,178 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Elain Harwood is the historian at English Heritage responsible for its post-war research and listing programme. Her publications on the subject include Tayler and Green with Alan Powers (1998) and many articles for Twentieth Century Architecture, the journal of the Twentieth Century Society.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I was recommended this and bought it shortly afterwards. I have not been disappointed. I've dipped in and out of this often. At over 700 pages there is plenty to look at and read about. I like the format a lot, a picture of the building and then a commentary as well as information on the architect. Harwood has done a great job and I recommend this to anyone with an interest in post war buildings, many of which get slated today but are all very worthy.
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Format: Hardcover
What is fascinating about this book is the wide variety of buildings that have been selected for listing. It is not, as one might have imagined, just the modernist icons of the last fifty years, but also examples of traditional, classical and vernacular architecture that have continued to be built, often going against the current fashions of the time.Projects such as McMorran and Whitby's Wood Street Police station in the City of London or Louis de Soissons' work at Welwyn Garden City both demonstrate a timelessness, indicating that they could have been built at any time in the last 200 years.
This book records in the selections of buildings that have been listed the story of how England built the Welfare State with its new schools and university buildings, public housing and community facilities. Many of these buildings explored new ways of living, teaching or working in addition to innovations in construction or materials. It is an important record of a tumultuous time of great change.
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Format: Hardcover
Since buying this book I've visited and photographed many of the buildings mentioned, many of which I'd not heard of before. It really is a comprehensive guide and the mostly one page descriptions of the buildings are superb. Attractive square hardback format. A couple of minor criticisms: there is no locations map for the buildings which are visitable, and some of the photographs seem a bit out of date (you can tell by the cars in the photos that they must be c90's).

On the whole though, highly recommended. Elain Harwood's guide to Nottinghamshire is very good too.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
not as good as people said
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