Buy Used
£5.00
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Enemies of Rome: From Hannibal to Attila the Hun Paperback – 15 Sep 2008

3.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£2.77 £2.21
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Thames and Hudson Ltd; 1 Ill edition (15 Sept. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0500287724
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500287729
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 0.3 x 2.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 930,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

`An easy book to dip into ... accurate and entertaining ... well worth browsing'
-- BBC History Magazine

About the Author

Philip Matyszak has a doctorate in Roman history from St. John s College, Oxford. His books include Legionary, Gladiator, Ancient Rome on 5 Denarii a Day, Ancient Athens on 5 Drachmas a Day, The Classical Compendium, Chronicle of the Roman Republic, and The Greek and Roman Myths. He lives in British Columbia, Canada.


Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I wouldn't recommend this book to a specialist in the field, nor even to someone with a sound general knowledge of the history of Rome. But, to anyone who is just beginning to explore this huge subject, I'd say that this nice, light read will go down well and have them hankering for more.
Briefly, the author sketches short biographies of some of the most notorious figures in the Empire's history, starting with Hannibal and ending with Attila the Hun. Despite the relative brevity of each portrait, I think readers will be able to engage with each 'character' in a way that isn't really possible with most of the heavier, academic-type books. Notably, the author also avoids that tiresome critisism and revisionism thing that bedevils far too many books on this subject, only ever introducing doubt about his ancient sources in a constructive and unobtrusive manner.
This is uncomplicated, straightforward and non-controversial stuff.
As I say, this is ideal for the generalist, armchair historian interested in the basics and could even provide the stimulus for really 'getting serious' about Roman history too.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
To often most of our reading around the Ancient world centres on Rome, Greece or Egypt. This book looks at the various nations and in some cases tribes that stood against the power of the day, Rome.

There is a quote at the beginning of this book that made it almost compulsory reading for me.

It points out how we often view The Roman Empire as a civilisation far more advanced than any other nation of its era based upon the wonders it has left behind. What we do not know or forget though is there were nations and peoples of the same era that may have been equally as advanced but were obliterated at the Roman sword. The Celts, Dacians, and Carthagians to name but a few! Who knows what mark they could have left if they were not repressed by the Romans.

This book is very light yet consuming read based on some of the individuals who stood against the military might that was Rome. Boudica, Vercingtorix, Jugurtha, Cleopatra, Mithridates and of course Hannibal all get a chapter, not to mention another dozen or so as well.

Like previous reviews have stated do not expect detailed views on the various nations led by the people mentioned, but do expect to enrich your own learning and perhaps get a point of view you had not expected.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A good gentle introduction to the enemies of Rome. An engaging read that I think would appeal to the general reader of history or classics. While not strictly academic - it does breathe life to a subject that can be a little dry and no doubt will inspire deeper reading.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a good starting point for exploration. Buy this book, read in brief about the most famous of the Roman enemies and conquests - and then if you like a particular area try to find a more specific book on the subject.

I've read many individual books over the years on the wars and enemies covered in this single book, and whenever I move on to a new subject of history I do the above each time to make sure i'm not missing anything interesting.

That said, this is a good foundation for the topic covered. If you read this cover to cover you will have a good overview of what made Rome great and how its military institutions were the glue of the state, and the pivotal aspect of all it achieved.

The authors style is very easy to read, it's not heavy going and if like me you tend to put a book down and not pick it up again for a few days; you'll find it easy to get back in to this as the layout is very concise and logical.

The only thing that stops me giving it a higher score is the fact some of the periods covered such as the Punic wars cant be given justice in the summary style, and I dont think it gives the reader enough scope of how epic these conflicts truly were.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback