Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Endgame 1945: Victory, Retribution, Liberation Hardcover – 30 Aug 2007

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£10.99 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


  • Watch the author talk about this book in Windows Media Player format: dial-up | broadband.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown & Company; UNKNOWN edition (30 Aug. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316727946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316727945
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 23.8 x 4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 626,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Endgame 1945 isn't a footnote to history. It's the last chapter in a book from which to learn before another volume opens'
-- Observer Review

'Stafford's gripping and moving book ... is an epic panorama of the death throes of Nazism, and makes brilliant use of the individual stories of ordinary people caught up in extraordinary events' -- Sunday Times

`Gripping and moving, Endgame 1945 makes brilliant use of the individual stories of ordinary people caught up in extraordinary events' -- The Times

`Stafford proves himself master of a dazzling narrative' -- Express

`Stafford relates the experiences of `ordinary' people on both sides, brilliantly interweaved with the fate of the monsters who had precipitated this cataclysm, most compellingly'
-- The Times

Book Description

* An absorbing, moving book about the weeks leading up to - and beyond - VE Day, 1945 --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This isn't a book I'd usually buy or read, but after reading a couple of reviews I thought I'd check it out. This is a book for the general reader, rather than the academic historian. While his writing style is solid rather than particularly exciting or inspiring, David Stafford does a solid job of story-telling & some impressive research has gone into compiling & editing the narratives of the protagonists. This is mainly a "ground-up" rather than a "top-down" account of the closing stages of WW2 in Europe. Having said that, its view is very much from the Western side of the fence. The Soviet army & people bore the brunt of the fight against Nazism, so its a pity there's no first hand input from anyone on the Soviet side here. Equally, I'd like to have heard more from the civilian side, both in the occupied countries & Germany itself.

Much of what we see & hear now abt this period concentrates on the big set pieces like D-Day & the Battle for Berlin/Hitler's Bunker, & (quite rightly) the Holocaust. Naturally this book has to concern itself with the last days of Berlin, but much of the book's power comes from the stories of other campaigns which aren't so well known to most people. I've always been interested in the Italian phase of the war, as my uncle Leslie was killed at the Anzio landings. Rather than go over familiar ground like the battle for Monte Cassino, DS uses the story of Geoffrey Cox to recount a chilling tale of the deadly & relentless grind through Italy - I could practically feel the cold & mud at times. A lot of this was totally new to me - for example, the narrowly-avoided war between Allied Forces & Tito's partisan army at Trieste.
Read more ›
Comment 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is an unusual book, and it both succeeds and fails in its goal of painting a picture of the last days of the Second World War. David Stafford has taken the personal memoirs, letters, and recollections of about a dozen people and tried to produce a tableau showing what life was like away from the biggest stories.
He relates the the handful of experiences with sympathy and illustrates how big politics affected real lives. The result is an interesting look into some areas that the history books have neglected, which helps to bring the real history alive. And it's quite a page turner, because reading about other peoples lives during a time of hellish upheaval, skilfully woven into a single narrative, is a sure-fire good read. This is a history that doesn't stop at the end of the war but shows how conquered became occupied and imprisoned became liberated. It's a fresh angle to a well-covered subject, and Stafford manages to conjure quite a vivid picture which casts new light on an old subject. The author does an excellent job of keeping the reader informed about the background and the bigger picture of politics and history which helps to flesh out the personal stories.
The most interesting bits are the tales of Nazi-hunting, rescuing fascist loot, fraternisation with the enemy and life in the concentration camps, much of which is written without relying directly on the chosen memoirists. There is also the fascinating tale of Mussolini's last hours, the moment when Lord Haw-Haw is shot through the buttocks and the truly amazing story of a convoy of VIPs kept as hostages by the Nazis, who were shunted around the Third Reich until their designated execution day, when their ingenuity and bravery proved more than a match for their guards.
Read more ›
1 Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
The topic of the last few months of WW2 is a gigantic one; so much slaughter, so much revenge, so much starvation and displacement. Perhaps it is a topic too great for conventional history. David Stafford has instead elected to build a montage of the period seen through its impact on a number of individuals, strategically chosen to be Everyman Everywhere. I found it this unhelpful but even with the "Meanwhile in Italy Albert Bonkers was...." feel the story is just breathtaking. I can only take my hat off to those who rebuilt the individual pieces of Europe.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely superb. All too often most books on WW2 in Europe end on the death of Hitler and not too much is said about how society in Europe coped in the immediate aftermath of the war finishing. This book is an excellent insight as to what happened and the problems that faced the Allies in this time (eg, The issues with Stalin, The huge numbers of German troops still wondering around, the massive displaced persons issues and the worrry of the Allies of German resistance groups still operating when the war ended). I really enjoyed the book and will be reading it again at somepoint soon. Loved it, it was educational and thought provoking.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
David Stafford has unearthed a number of amazing personal stories here that I had not read in previous books on this subject.

Particularly poignant is the story of Fey Von Hassel, who's father was one of the Hitler Bomb Plot conspirators and she is imprisoned as a result and separated from her young children.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback