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An Endangered Species by [Gower, David]
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An Endangered Species Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 336 pages
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Review

'David Gower, England batting great turned Sky presenter, compares himself with Kevin Pietersen as a man apart in the dressing room in his new book An Endangered Species, published yesterday. Gower also revisits his hugely difficult relationship with Graham Gooch, now England's battling coach, when they were the two marquee players in the Test side'-- Charles Sale, Daily Mail

'In his just published second autobiography, An Endangered Species (with the excellent Simon Wilde) Gower talks about doubts that drove him close to despair. The light-hearted prank with the Tiger Moth turns out to be a watershed incident in his life, something from which he never fully recovered. Gower is an extremely pleasant fellow. We share an interest in Wildlife, especially African, and both do stuff for the World Land Trust. I have known him for 25 years; never well, but I suspect for many people much closer to him, there's always something rather unknowable about him. Amazing, then, that he's dropped his guard a little in this book' --Simon Barnes, The Times

About the Author

David Gower was born in 1957 and made his England debut in 1978, famously hitting his first ball in Test cricket to the boundary. He went on to win 117 caps for his country, scoring 8231 runs and captaining the side 32 times. After retiring from the game, he moved into a broadcasting career as a team captain in the hugely popular series 'They Think It's All Over' and has been the main presenter of Sky Sports' cricket coverage for many years now.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 10906 KB
  • Print Length: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK (22 May 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JSRWKY0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #293,575 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Graham Mummery TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 Oct. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Being of the generation that came of age when David Gower was at his peak as an England batsman, I'm one who regards his batting as possibly the most beautiful thing I ever saw on the cricket field. In his earlier years, until injury hampered this, he was also one of the greatest cover point fielders ever. I remember his legendary entrance into Test cricket, hooking his first ball for four. Ever since then, I was captivated. Something of this still comes through even now when he is perhaps better known as a television presenter.

Though perhaps slightly less celebrated than his colleague and friend, Sir Ian Botham, Gower weaved more than enough magic of his own to be a legend in his own right. I also feel a closer affinity towards Gower, who is more complex a personality, and his batting always seemed like an act of grace. One of my memories is of watching him bat at Lords in a minor MCC match. An American couple were also watching, struggling to understand the game, and the British fascination with it, from the rules. Perhaps not the best way to understand it! Then Gower came in and produced some of his magic. They went away having seen the sublime heights that it can sometimes reach.

It's this that Gower explores in this book. The first chapter is perhaps the best, and most revealing, where he discusses how being seen as a player whose game seemed effortless put an extra burden upon him in terms of expectations. It meant that when something went wrong he would be accused of "not trying." How the ease of his stroke-play, and his insouciant manner, which he admits was in part a defence mechanism, later in his career were counted against him, despite still being one of the best players of his time. And the England team certainly didn't perform better without him!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a firm believer that the Author has serious claims to being the GLE (Greatest Living Englishman) I have to give him the 5 stars. Mind you I could point out that on the bookshelf above the desk in front of me is another work from the same hand (albeit guided by Martin Johnson rather than Simon Wilde) which bears a remarkable similarity to the first half of this one - it's entitled "Gower - The Autobiography" (even some of the photos are the same). Mind you, I see that in 1992 the said book cost me £14.99 whereas now, courtesy of the electronic world in which we live, the new instalment was considerably cheaper!
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Format: Hardcover
As others have mentioned this book is a bit repetitive in places and dwells on certain subjects for rather too long (his cavalier personality traits, justifications for his various (minor) misdemeanours and other players he considered non conformists such as Botham, Edmonds, Flintoff, Lamb and even Pieterson, whilst thinly disguising his contempt for the ultimate conformist Gooch. This was all a bit dull to be honest.

Overall a decent read but slightly disappointing given the undoubted flair of the man.
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Format: Paperback
I don’t really have any memories of David Gower as a player but I’ve always liked him as a commentator and enjoyed his sense of humour, so I was really looking forward to reading his book.

The book has some good moments, but overall I was left a little bit disappointed. I just found the first half of the book in particular to be a bit repetitive, often coming back to themes that he’d already covered in sufficient detail earlier. For example, he goes into detail about his personality and how it wasn’t in him to be professional all the time etc. While this was interesting I didn’t feel it was necessary to revisit it as often (or in as much detail) as he did. Equally, when recounting social incidents off the pitch I got a similar feeling – there are only so many Ian Botham stories you need to read before you get the point. I’d have preferred it if he’d spent some of this time discussing some of his opponents and the teams he played against instead. This would have been more interesting and given the book a bit more variety.

Having said that, David Gower’s sense of humour does come through quite a bit (which is a good thing!) and I enjoyed reading about his time as Captain in particular. The second half of the book is a good read - we get to hear a bit more on his general views on the game (as well as on commentating).
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Format: Hardcover
This book contains some interesting insights into David Gower's careers as test and county cricketer and cricket broadcaster. There are some amusing stories of life on tour, relations with team mates and colleagues, and some revealing points about form and confidence. However, the way in which Gower was at odds with the prevailing professional culture in cricket, particularly in the second half of his career, is the dominating theme here. While it's clearly true, and does reveal some interesting points about the way sport works, the frequent explanations of this are rather wearing, and seem to divert the book from more interesting stories. Also, its writing is at times a bit clumsy - not really what I expected of a volume co-authored with Simon Wilde.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very good and easy read that picks up where the previous book left off would recommend to any lord gower fan
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