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The End of Poverty: How We Can Make it Happen in Our Lifetime Paperback – 7 Apr 2005

4.0 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (7 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141018666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141018669
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Book and man are brilliant, passionate, optimistic and impatient... Outstanding. ("The Economist") If there is any one work to put extreme poverty back onto the global agenda, this is it. ("Publishers Weekly", starred review) Paul Wolfowitz should read Jeffrey Sachs's compelling new book. (Fareed Zakaria, "Newsweek")

"Book and man are brilliant, passionate, optimistic and impatient... Outstanding." The Economist

"If there is any one work to put extreme poverty back onto the global agenda, this is it." Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Paul Wolfowitz should read Jeffrey Sachs s compelling new book." Fareed Zakaria, Newsweek

Professor Sachs has provided a compelling blueprint for eliminating extreme poverty from the world by 2025. Sachs s analysis and proposals are suffused with all the practical experience of his twenty years in the field working in dozens of countries across the globe to foster economic development and well-being. George Soros, financier and philanthropist

"Sachs proposes a many-pronged, needs-based attack...that is eminently practical and minimally pipe-dreamy...A solid, reasonable argument in which the dismal science offers a brightening prospect for the world's poor." Kirkus

"This is an excellent, understandable book on a critical topic and should be required reading for students and participants in public policy as well as those who doubt the problem of world poverty can be solved." Mary Whaley, Booklist

" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Jeffrey Sachs is the Director of The Earth Institute, Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development, and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University as well as Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan. He is internationally renowned for his work as economic advisor to governments in Latin America, Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Asia and Africa.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Jeffrey Sach's book should be listed in the biographies and not in the economics section. Filled with generalisations and shortcuts and forwarded by an awestruck Bono, it fails to impress. Once one reaches the end of the book where the recipe to end poverty follows Dr. Sachs world travels, he/she will find the Gap Financing approach to development. The main idea is to indentify the national savings rate, the projected needed investment rate and fill the gap by aid. This pretty much has been the ineffectual method used since the end of WWII to address issues of underdevelopment. A quick survey of the literature (especially Easterly, 2001) can show its limitations. At least Dr. Sachs largely avoids presenting us too rudely with the usual neoliberal orthodoxy paraded by the World Bank and the IMF around the globe. Worth reading but probably not worth applying.
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Format: Hardcover
As Sachs has spent many years working for the World Bank and the forward of his latest book was by Bono, I was very skeptical of this book. However, I found the first half of this book interesting. It described the history of global economics, why countries have developed at different rates and there were case studies of economic reforms in India, China, Poland and Hungary. Although the case studies were economically interesting and very readable, I felt the name dropping and Sachs ego got a little tiring after a while.

The concept I liked most in this book was how Sachs used a `clinical diagnosis' of economic difficulties that countries faced which took into account geography, politics and health. This also highlighted the importance of individual countries developing their own policies for development, and not having a one size fits all policy forced upon them from the World Bank or IMF. I think this is a conclusion that most people who work within the World Bank soon realise, but often too late.

I was less impressed with the second half of the book which aimed to describe how to end poverty. The answer was to increase funding from developing countries, written in detail for too many pages. Although this may be beneficial, I expected more innovation and creativity by a World Renowned Economic Professor. After finishing the book, I felt he had wasted his time writing the second half. This perhaps demonstrates that there are no quick fixes to problems as complex as poverty but surely one of the most influential people in the world could have come up with a better idea than simply giving more money? I won't be recommending this book to anyone.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book on a recommendation and wasn't really sure whether I wanted to read a book written by an economist. Well, this book is a true 'eye opener.' Jeffrey Sach's account is well written, enjoyable and doesn't hold back any punches. His main conclusion is that poverty can be alleviated globally but 'Richer' economies' lack the will to make any serious inroads to tackle the problem.

It also highlights the bad decisions and policies followed by the 'western leaders' and his hypothesis that even 'current backlash against the west' could have been dealt with far more effectively, if a concerted effort had been made to eradicate poverty.

A compelling, powerful and moving account, together with a blueprint for the future.

Future leaders, such as Imran Khan (Pakistan), would be well placed to read this book as Jeffrey Sachs needs to be on any team serious about changing the plight of it's people.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the first two chapters fascinating information is revealed about wealth creation and the resulting global wealth inequality in just two centuries. In 1820 the per capita income in USA was only threefold higher than in Africa namely 1,200 versus 400 dollars that is then the whole humanity was poor. To-day the per capita income in USA is 25fold higher than Africa. It is also a myth that this was the result of exploitation of the rich western countries of their former colonies though the author readily acknowledges that such exploitation occurred. The true engines of wealth creation are science and technology, division of labour and trade. Wealth creation is a no zero sum game that is one country does not get rich at the expense of another, all countries can escape from the poverty trap.
The author cites the evolution of wealth in parallel to the evolution of technology and industrialization with the resulting urbanization.
It all started in mid-eighteenth hundred century that is around 1750 with the invention of steam and its application in the textile industry and the steam boats. Then around 1850 the rapid mobility of people, merchandise and information with the invention of rail trains and telegraph. And around the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth of the internal combustion engine and electricity and the exploitation of fossil fuels as a source of energy. Also he attributes credit to German Chemistry for the techniques of extracting nitrogen from the atmosphere to make fertilizers and thereby increase crop yields.
The rest of the book is stimulating and articulates the thesis of the author that with International Aid, extreme poverty which he defines as people earning one dollar or less per day and now afflicting 1.
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