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The Enculturated Gene: Sickle Cell Health Politics and Biological Difference in West Africa: Living Science and Disease in Modern Africa Paperback – 27 Nov 2011


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Review

Duana Fulwilley has produced an extraordinary work that incorporates the insights of anthropology as well as science and technology studies of genetics and race. It is also exceptional in its multi-sited focus on Senegal and France, since many similar studies of genetics have tended to focus on the US and Europe.--Elisha P. Renne "Anthropological Quarterly "


Duana Fulwilley has produced an extraordinary work that incorporates the insights of anthropology as well as science and technology studies of genetics and race. It is also exceptional in its multi-sited focus on Senegal and France, since many similar studies of genetics have tended to focus on the US and Europe.
--Elisha P. Renne "Anthropological Quarterly "

This book of Duana Fullwiley, an associate professor of anthropology at Harvard University, is essentially a 'medical ethnography' or the study of the Senegalese people relating to the ailments and diseases they are afflicted with. But despite its title, this book is not just a scholarly treatise. It is a shocking expose on how the lack of medical resources and health care funding in Senegal have had tragic and fatal consequences upon sickle cell anemia sufferers there.--Paiso Jamakar "Biz India "

Winner of the 2011 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology, Royal Anthropological Institute


Winner of the 2011 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology, Royal Anthropological Institute



Winner of the 2014 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, American Anthropological Association

Winner of the 2011 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology, Royal Anthropological Institute


"Duana Fulwilley has produced an extraordinary work that incorporates the insights of anthropology as well as science and technology studies of genetics and race. It is also exceptional in its multi-sited focus on Senegal and France, since many similar studies of genetics have tended to focus on the US and Europe."--Elisha P. Renne, "Anthropological Quarterly"


"Duana Fullwiley has produced an extraordinary work that incorporates the insights of anthropology as well as science and technology studies of genetics and race. It is also exceptional in its multi-sited focus on Senegal and France, since many similar studies of genetics have tended to focus on the US and Europe."--Elisha P. Renne, "Anthropological Quarterly"

""The Enculturated Gene" is the product of over ten years of research beginning in the late 1990s. The book is stunning in its scope and attention to a full range of issues, from discoveries in the lab to knowledge production in the clinic to global health responses. . . . By elucidating ethnographically the contingencies that have produced the local and global health responses to sickle cell disease, Fullwiley shows us that health policy is as much a product of culture and subjectivity as affective responses to physical and existential pain."--Carolyn Rouse, "Medical Anthropology Quarterly"

Winner of the 2014 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, American Anthropological Association
Winner of the 2011 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology, Royal Anthropological Institute

From the Back Cover

"Duana Fullwiley has produced a richly textured ethnography of what it means to study the way medical science approaches a disease across broad cultural landscapes. In so doing, she has built a bridge across C. P. Snow's 'two cultures.'"--Troy Duster, author of "Backdoor to Eugenics"

"In this meticulously crafted ethnography, Fullwiley exposes the tragic human consequences of a belief in a 'mild form' of sickle cell anemia thought to affect Senegalese. International donors, scientists, and local peoples alike adhere to this belief, fueled by cultural strategies of coping in an environment of shocking medical lack. This first book-length ethnography about genetic disease in Africa, a must-read for social scientists and health care professionals, demonstrates irrevocably how tangled power relations and biogenetic difference inform embodiment and subjectivity."--Margaret Lock, coauthor of "An Anthropology of Biomedicine"

"An important contribution to the social studies of science and critical medical anthropology, "The Enculturated Gene" offers an insightful perspective on and a sensitive understanding of the experiences and dilemmas of patients, doctors, and scientists dealing with sickle cell anemia in West Africa."--Didier Fassin, Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton

"Based on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, "The Enculturated Gene" admirably demonstrates how sickle cell disease forms new associations in and between the domains of biomedicine, biopolitics, and the everyday lives of sufferers. Fullwiley demonstrates that universalistic, biomedical concepts of disease have only limited value in understanding embodied, situated disease."--Stefan Beck, Humboldt University of Berlin

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