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The Empress Of Ice Cream by [Capella, Anthony]
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The Empress Of Ice Cream Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Length: 416 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

An enjoyable romp of a novel. --Time Out

One of those delicious, feel-good stories that begs to be read in the sun. --The Times for The Wedding Officer

Book Description

The intoxicating new historical fiction novel from the bestselling author of The Food of Love. Sensual and erotic, this novel continues Capella's trademark themes of romance and food.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1461 KB
  • Print Length: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere (5 Aug. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0048BQR9A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #248,178 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have read all of Anthony Capella's other books, and enjoyed them greatly. I did a little dance when i realised there was a new one to read. Mr Capella never ceases to make me want to get into my kitchen and start cooking, and has inspired me on many occasion to try new flavours and ingredients, and to pay closer attention to my pallet. Once again, in this book I enjoyed wonderful descriptions of food, and smells, and cooking, as well as well formed characters that I felt attached to. I devoured this book, and dreamed of sorbets and ice cream every night after reading it. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
I think it's really difficult to find a non-genre novel these days, something that isn't crime, a thriller, chick-lit, supernatural romance etc, so this book fills a gap very nicely. Part historical novel, part love story, part sensual homage to food, this is a fluent and voluptuous read.

Set in 1670, it starts in Medicean Florence, travels to Paris under Louis XIV and then spends the rest of the time in Charles II's London ten years after the Restoration. The story comprises two first person narratives: Carlo, an Italian ice-cream maker, obsessed with his art; and Louise de Keroualle, the woman sent to seduce Charles II.

This isn't a hugely plot-driven novel but I found it completely engrossing. Capella manages to insert all the right historical personages (Rochester, Nell Gwynn, Buckingham, Barbara Villiers) without them ever feeling shoe-horned in and brings them to life without allowing them to hijack the story he's telling, no mean feat.

But what really brings this book to life is Capella's own passion for food which he attributes to Carlo, the ice-cream maker extraordinaire. Not being at all a foodie, I never thought I would find the invention of recipes so compelling, but this conveys the dedication, creativity and obsession of a food artist perfectly and reminded me of [[Perfume (Penguin Modern Classics)]] in its intricate and sensual detail.

Ultimately this is not a deep and meaningful book, but it is as delicious as the ices Carlo describes so lovingly.
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By Lincs Reader TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
The Empress of Ice Cream is Anthony Capella's fourth novel, eagerly anticipated by myself as I devoured the first three - it really doesn't disappoint and yet again he weaves a wonderful story containing love, history, food and a little bit of Italy. Although the story is set in France and mainly in England, Italy is represented by Carlo - the male narrator of the story.

Although a fictional story, the events are based on historical fact and centre mainly on the power struggle between King Louis XIV and the courtiers of Charles II - the Dutch Wars and of course, the discovery of ice-cream - and how many of us knew that ice cream was invented here in England?

The story is narrated alternatively by Carlo Demarco - a young apprentice confectioner and Louise de Keroualle, an ex lady-in-waiting who Louis XIV has decided will become the next mistress of Charles II in order to pave the way for France to become the greatest country in Europe.

Carlo is in love with Louise, but it soon becomes clear that Louise is only in love with the idea of becoming the next Queen of England.

I dont read a lot of historical fiction and when I do, I tend to prefer stories about 'ordinary people' rather than royalty, however, this story is so well-written that I soon became immersed in the goings on of the English court. It amused me to read about how Parliament were discussing how they were going to pay off the King's debts, nowadays they are worrying about how they will pay their own! Charles II was a serial womaniser, Nell Gwynne was probably his most famous mistress and Capella depicts her as a witty impersonator who used her position as the King's mistress to her best advantage.
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Format: Paperback
I was glad to read a book where the ending and storyline had not been done exactly as before. The book centres on a fictional character Carlo who invents ice cream and the book is littered with genuine excerpts from Stuart cookbooks which are interesting and different to read. The other main character is Charles II famous French mistress Louise and it follows them both through the politics of the Stuart court.

Pros
We get to see Italy, Paris and London through an inventor & celebrity chefs eyes.
Easy read; not a prticularly complicated plot.

Cons
Neither Carlo or Louise are likeable and therefore I didnt particularly care what happened to them. Carlo spends his time treating the lower orders badly (and whilst this is probably believeable, it didnt make me at all sympathetic to what his fate might be). Louise starts off in a promising light as an honourable and honset woman, but soon her character gets muddled until the point where I didnt care about her either.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked the premise of this story but unfortunately didn't like the characters. They were selfish and mean and appeared quite cold. This put me off the story. I loved The Food of Love - and if you're looking at this book, don't buy and spend your money on Food of Love - a much more lovely story.
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