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God Emperor of Didcot (Space Captain Smith) Paperback – 2 Sep 2008

4.3 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Myrmidon Books Ltd (2 Sept. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905802242
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905802241
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 256,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Toby Frost has written film reviews for the book "The DVD Stack "and articles for "Solander "magazine.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A jolly good read, don't you know. If Lady Chatterly's Lover can be summed up as a useful book about gamekeeping, then the God Emperor of Didcot is an absolutely essential read for any budding religious despot who wants to control the world's tea supplies. To those of that mind I wholeheartedly recommend this book, because it will show you rotters that so long as tea drinking British people live and breathe, then you jolly well will not succeed in your evil despicable plans for world domination. Mocks the British. Mocks religious nutters. Mocks Prog Rock. Extols the virtues of the plucky underdog, so long as they drink tea. The Verulam Writer's Circle must be jolly proud of Toby and if they really have helped Toby fufill his destiny, then it a big hurrah to them. HURRAH! An absolutely splendid effort. It is too long a wait till the next book and I bet it's a hardback next time as well.
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Format: Paperback
You might call Isambard Smith the Anti-Flashman, though the covers at first seem similar. But look closely at that cover. Does Smith have a scantly clad woman draped around his leg? No, he's got a dead body at his feet and holding a cup of hot tea. Proper.

Smith is about as different to Flashman as you can get. He's not a womanizer, a coward, or a bully for one (well, three) thing(s). About the only thing they have in common is a decent mustache. But Smith isn't a larger than life hero without flaws. Outside of a good fight he's downright awkward, especially around members of the opposite sex. But he also embodies everything we're meant to see in the British Space Empire - noble and refined, with its citizens carrying a stiff upper lip and not dealing with things like "feelings" in public. Dreadnought Diplomacy is alive and well. When one speaks of "civilizing" an alien culture, it refers to how the iron fist is used if talking sensibly to the silly buggers didn't work.

Smith's long time friend is a Morlock (or M'Lak) called Suruk the Slayer (Doom Purveyor, Son of Agshad Nine-Swords, Grandson of Urgar the Miffed). The M'Lak look vaguely like a thin version of the Predator but their personality better fits the "noble savage" archetype from classic adventure literature like King Solomon's Mines

To act as a foil to Smith and Suruk are two women: Pollyanna Carveth, a fugitive sex toy masquerading as the ship's pilot, and Rhianna Mitchell, a New-New Age hippie herbalist from the American Free States (think California). Despite the fact she is so unlike Smith - or perhaps because of it - he can't help but fall head over heals for her, nor can he help but blow almost every opportunity he has to score with her.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This second outing (no, not like that) for Captain Smith & his intrepid Crew is well worth investing your pennies in. Thwarting the dastardly Ghasts & awful Edenites as they try to undermine the Empire by stealing our Tea

Roll on book 3
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By Charles Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Sept. 2008
Format: Paperback
'God Emperor of Didcot', Toby Frost's second novel following the adventures of Captain Smith of the British Galactic Empire and his crew comprising a sex-toy android turned pilot, an incredibly violent alien, a hamster called Gerald and on occasion a half new age hippy woman/ half-ethereal alien, is a joy from start to finish.

Gently sending up sci-fi classics such as Dune (replace 'spice'of Frank Herbert's epic with 'tea' and you'll get the idea) whilst simultaneously parodying elements of our own world (nouveau arrivistes, new-agers and religious fanatics all receive a gentle or not-so gentle ribbing), it is full of truly laugh out loud moments. You don't even need to be a sci-fi fan to get much of the humour. Being British would probably help, since many of the targets are particular to this country, but even that isn't vital.

There is also decent plot & characters to go along with all the jokes. The adventures of Space Captain Smith are not simple spoofs, even if they do mock or lampoon other fictional genres along the way. The story here, a mix of Dune, War of the Worlds and Casablanca if that is possible, is properly constructed and you actually care what happens. Equally you care about Smith and his companions. Yes, they can be utter idiots and are drawn in broad strokes, but they are also recognisably human (even the aliens). If God Emperor of Didcot was simply a series of skits hung on a waifer thin plot it would probably still be funny but not as half as satisfying as it actually is.

I really cannot recommend this book, or its prequel, highly enough. I suspect that it will not be long before some bright TV producer picks up a copy and spots the potential for a TV adaptation. Reading both books I could not help but feel that this would be perfect for either (British) TV or Radio. Try it and see if you agree...
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Format: Paperback
Fresh from a full-on assault on the entire sci-fi genre with Space Captain Smith, Toby Frost has this time around focused more narrowly on a particular target: Dune. But this is not simply a rehash of "Bored of the Rings" or, more appropriately, the giant pretzels of "Doon". Didcot, or "Urn", is a tea-producing planet that keeps the British Space Empire properly lubricated and suitably infused with moral fibre. Yes, the parallels with Spice are obvious - and played up - but once again the series is internally consistent while completely over the top.

The Ghast Empire - with their fanatical god-bothering allies, the Edenites - have launched an attack on Urn. But the tea must brew, and Urn be recaptured from the filthy ant-men hordes. Smith's old nemesis 462 is back, complete with steampunk monocle, and Gilead, with steampunk robot body (except for his bladder). Anyway, Space Captain Isambard Smith finds himself on Urn, dealing with convent schoolgirls, the Sauceress Sam O'Varr, and a nudist spec-ops warrior (apparently the author of "Small Unit, Deep Penetration", the standard handbook in the field).

There is still plenty of fun to be had here - the mockery is by no means restrained to Dune. Smith must rescue Rhianna, escape from Urn, bring back an army to free the planet, and defeat the Ghast hordes. Oh, and if possible, get his end away with Rhianna, if he can overcome his deeply repressed feelings. Suruk has skulls to collect and polish, Polly Carveth is still hunting for her perfect man, and Gerald is along for the ride. Smith is still a bit two-dimensional - but what dimensions! I still cant work out if he is army, navy, civilian adventurer or Company employee, and apart from the reference to schooldays, Smith's history is a blank page.
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