For Emma Forever Ago (Vin... has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£15.45
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Fast Fulfilment
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.99

For Emma Forever Ago (Vinyl) [VINYL]

4.3 out of 5 stars 147 customer reviews

Price: £15.45 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
AutoRip is available only for eligible CDs and vinyl sold by Amazon EU Sarl (but does not apply to gift orders or PrimeNow orders). See Terms and Conditions for full details, including costs which may apply for the MP3 version in case of order returns or cancellations.
In stock.
Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
25 new from £14.18 1 used from £35.00

Amazon Has Certified That This Packaging Is Frustration-Free
This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.
£15.45 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details In stock. Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
Amazon Has Certified That This Packaging Is Frustration-Free
This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.

Amazon's Bon Iver Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • For Emma Forever Ago (Vinyl) [VINYL]
  • +
  • Bon Iver [VINYL]
  • +
  • Fleet Foxes [VINYL]
Total price: £48.45
Buy the selected items together

Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (28 April 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: 4ad
  • ASIN: B00166QJMU
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (147 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,334 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
3:39
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
2
30
3:21
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
3
30
3:58
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
4
30
5:22
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
5
30
5:29
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
6
30
3:06
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
7
30
1:56
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
8
30
3:40
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
9
30
6:41
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 

Product Description

Product Description

Our product to treat is a regular product. There is not the imitation. From Japan by the surface mail because is sent out, take it until arrival as 7-14 day. Thank you for you seeing it.

Review

It's hard to believe that For Emma, Forever Ago is the work of one man. But when Justin Vernon's old band split he hauled himself (and presumably plenty of instruments and recording equipment) to his dad's hunting cabin in the woods of Wisconsin for the coldest season and worked through his issues in musical form. (The name comes from the French for "good winter"--"bon hiver"). By the start of the spring thaw he had recorded the bulk of this stunning debut, originally self-issued to acclaim last year in the USA and now picked up for a British release. Vernon's voice grabs the ear from the start, switching easily into a smooth falsetto (and unusually for a white indie lad, without the slightest intent of emulating Prince). The formula is straightforward. He layers his vocal harmonies, while a gently strummed acoustic rhythm guitar just about holds the centre. All else from horns to slide guitar is mere detail. The quality is rough and ready but the effect is strangely similar though to the slick vocal confections of European women like Bjork and Camille, all mystery and distance. It's the musical equivalent of reading someone else's diary. In code. Through a dirty window. Enigmatic songs like the elegantly stumbling "Creature Fear" with its rowdy horn parts, the resolute opener "Flume" and the evanescent "Team" are just so pretty they seem to glide by without leaving a mark in the snow. Vernon is apparently a straightforward and friendly guy, but For Emma, Forever Ago genuinely sounds like something from a far off place. --Steve Jelbert
-- Amazon.co.uk Review

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Like Dylan, Justin Vernon aka Bon Iver (it's a one-man show) understands that simple, acoustic-led arrangements married with lyrical depth can really pack a punch. Written during a self-imposed period of isolation in the Wisconsin woods after the break-up with his girlfriend and a serious illness, For Emma, Forever Ago is an achingly elegiac album and each track is an emotionally-charged vignette. Listen to Skinny Love for a sample of Vernon's musings on the loneliness of losing love or The Wolves (Act 1 and II) for a taste of accusatory hurt: `someday my pain will mark you. Harness your blame'. Despite its soul-baring, For Emma... is a surprisingly uplifting journey and a reminder of the beauty one man and his guitar can create.
Comment 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
In a similar vein to Damien Rice's debut album O, For Emma, Forever Ago is currently spending its gestation time simmering below the radar of popular consciousness before it surely soars into the affections of many. Like Damien Rice before him, Justin Vernon (who in this case goes by the alias, Bon Iver) has created a record of such delicate, intimate beauty that you are left amazed by how it could leave you quite so drained.

Although many reading this will already be aware of the context of this record and how it was made, it is integral to the listening experience and so worth mentioning again - although in truth, the music and melodies alone will be enough for some (perhaps more so given the lyrics are slightly hard to distinguish without the booklet). Following the break-up of his band and a relationship frustrated by an ongoing illness, Vernon 'hibernated' and ensconced himself in a cabin in the Wisconsin wilderness. His self-imposed isolation surfaced feelings of loss, guilt and longing carried over the years. With no real intention of recording, the three month exile ended up being musically inspiring and led to the recording of nine polished tracks - though polished doesn't seem like the correct word. The record's raw, organic constitution is thanks largely to the fact that Vernon was unprepared to record and used only basic equipment he had with him at the time. Each track offers little more than acoustic guitars, occasional electric guitar licks and an inventive use of vocal layering and haunting vocal reverb effects.

The album opens strongly with Flume and you are immediately aware that you are experiencing something of particular note. Instantly, the album's striking sense of poignancy seems to flood out of Vernon's falsettos and harmonies.
Read more ›
4 Comments 50 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Download
I was first introduced to Bon Iver's music through a cover of "Skinny Love" that a mate of mine was playing at a gig. Although I didn't catch the whole song, even just a snippet of it was enough to make me want to get into this stuff - I was blown away by the power and depth of the songwriting, as well as the beautifully honest lyrics. And when I came to buying the album, I was far from disappointed - that particular song is still a stand-out, but the rest of the album is just as sublime.

Lyrically, "For Emma, Forever Ago" could be read as one long narrative, brimming with honesty, jealousy, guilt, love, loss, pain and a sense of loneliness which can only have come from the circumstances in which it was recorded - Justin Vernon, the mastermind behind the three-piece (though Vernon regularly plays solo as well), wrote and recorded practically the entire album with aged recording gear and a few microphones during 3 months spent absolutely alone in his father's hunting lodge in the woods of Wisconsin, USA. This time was originally going to be used exclusively for 'soul searching' and recovery from sickness and breakups (from both his band and girlfriend), though luckily for us it seems that the only way he was able to effectively channel his emotions was through songwriting and recording.

Even right from delicate opener "Flume," it is obvious that there has been no holding back in the writing of these songs - though often cryptic, there is no doubt that these lyrics are pure, unspoilt poetry - "Only love is all maroon / Lapping lakes like leery loons / Leaving rope burns - reddish ruse" may not be the most accessible refrain, but that is just not what this record is about. There is no shortage of pain here - "Now all your love is wasted / And who the hell was I?
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I bought this CD on recommendation from Amazon, so bit of a risk for me.

At first I wasn't convinced, but left it in the car. And what I've found is pretty amazing - the feeling I get when this is playing is one of such serenity and calmness, it's wonderful. Now, when this is playing, trips in the car are less about the destination and more about the journey.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Like no doubt thousands of young guys and girls during the late 00's, I got my heart broken to the soundtrack of Bon Iver. I was an undergraduate at university, and as Nick Hornby in High Fidelity observed, it was hard to tell what came first - was I miserable because I loved Bon Iver, or did I love Bon Iver because I was miserable? Did my enjoyment of the album instil in me a subconscious desire to experience the same things Justin Vernon sang about, draped in eerie harmonies, clicks and scrapes, to run the same gamut of emotions, or was it simply catharsis with the pain that he sings so vividly and almost tangibly about that drew me in closer to the warm tones? Regardless, the album For Emma, Forever Ago brings back powerful, if unrefined, emotions. The peculiar flavour of heartbreak, with its delicate, absolute and all-consuming awfulness and despair is a memory that I think we can all remember or at least empathise with. And it's at its most beautiful in songs like Skinny Love, re:stacks and Blindsided, (and Beach Baby from the LP, Blood Bank) songs of anger, mourning, shock, pain, loss, sadness, and ultimately, by the end of the album, acceptance and redemption. It's an intense experience that draws the listener in and confronts them with raw emotion, exposing their own feelings.

On a more personal level, this was the first album for me that addressed love and loss in such an oblique manner ('there's a black crow sitting across from me; his wiry legs are crossed / And he's dangling my keys, he even fakes a toss' is only one example of many) so as, counter intuitively, to make it seem more genuine, free from what I perceived to be the clichés of songs about heartbreak.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback