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Embedded by [Abnett, Dan]
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Embedded Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

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Length: 368 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

"Abnett takes an ingenious idea and produces a nail-biting tale that has serious things to say about war and the news media." --Eric Brown, The Guardian

"Dan Abnett makes war so real you want to duck." --SciFi.com

"The cinematic scope and dizzying vision we're shown puts most recent SF movie epics into deep shade." - --SF Site

Review

"Abnett takes an ingenious idea and produces a nail-biting tale that has serious things to say about war and the news media." - Eric Brown, The Guardian

"Dan Abnett makes war so real you want to duck." - SciFi.com

"The cinematic scope and dizzying vision we're shown puts most recent SF movie epics into deep shade." - SF Site

"Abnett delivers the kind of pulsating military sci-fi that we all know he can" - Graeme's Fantasy Book Review

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 745 KB
  • Print Length: 368 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Angry Robot (2 Mar. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004VS4PBC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #213,301 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"The other grenade detonated as it struck the sternum of the man whose shots had just missed Preben. The blastforce drove him down into the ground like a peg, and left his upper body and arms mangled and burning."

This is futuristic warfare at its most violent. This is the Hard Place. This is Embedded, by Dan Abnett.

Journalist Lex Falk is assigned to planet Eighty-Six, a world seemingly as dull and uneventful as the others--as dull and uneventful as the military high command wants everyone to believe it is. But Falk senses something different, and when an explosion is dismissed as nothing despite the evidence, Falk decides to go in undercover. He gets wired into the brain of Nestor Bloom, one of the soldiers on the frontline. Falk finds out that things are as bad as he suspected, that there is a war raging behind a smokescreen provided by the military high brass. And when Bloom takes a shot to the head, Falk finds himself in control of a body that isn't his, in charge of a squadron that isn't his--and it's up to him to not only get the scoop of his journalistic lifetime, but to lead his soldiers out of the Hard Place alive.

All in all, Embedded is a great read, fast-paced for the most part and loaded with violently detailed action sequences. The cast of characters are real and identifiable, and the reader has little trouble getting to like Preben and Rash and Bigmouse, along with the other members of the team desperately trying to survive a bloody war. The technology is believable and the weapons leave you in no doubt that this is some serious futuristic firepower. The firefights are when this book truly comes to life: the escape from an abandoned house, led by Falk, being a particularly memorable one.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Dan Abnett, a very experienced military and corruption scifi writer, brings a lot of recognizable ingredients to a story that reads fast and easy. Plenty of good luck and brutal action overlay what I can sometimes read as a profound meditation on the relationship between geeks like me and the military-corporate complex we depend on, fear and occasionally hero worship. I like his work in general, and though this is familiar from his other stories (especially his short "In Memoriam") it has been well executed.
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Format: Paperback
We are on Eighty-Six, a planet with a peace-keeping operation that might be the first real war in an interstellar cold war. Lex Falk is an acclaimed and seasoned war correspondent and he sees straight through the stonewalling from the military. Determined to find out the truth he allows himself to be embedded in the mind of one of the soldiers fighting the insurgency. But the soldier takes a bullet under the eye that scrambles his brain and the only thing keeping him alive is Falk who has to survive the ambush and get them out.

I enjoyed how the military tried to control the media and Falk's inner commentary as well as his interaction with his fellow journalists. There are some obvious contemporary commentary embedded in this novel about the military and the media. He comes across some old friends and he rekindles his friendship with them in a way that makes me want to know more of his previous life and paints a picture of the universe in an elegant way without using info dumps. There is also this initially annoying but tenacious young rookie out on her first assignment that we see evolve as the story goes along.

Falk himself has a serious case of ennui in the beginning but as the going gets though he gets going. His character reminded me in some ways of Humphrey Bogart or someone out of a Hemingway novel. Falk is reasonable competent as a soldier and his personal flaws make him human. He has to keep up appearance with the soldiers he comes across while he brings his man home from enemy territory. Layer after layer of what is going on is revealed as they hike. The military action is up personal and you keep guessing what is really going on and when you think you know you are wrong. I had all kinds of theories up until we saw Embedded revealed.
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Format: Paperback
I wanted desperately to love this book, sadly it fell just a little short of brilliance.

It's by Dan Abnett, one of my favourite authors and the man who's work got me writing, so you can see why I may have had preconceived notions about the quality. Before reading, however, I made a concerted effort not to go into the book determined to worship it no matter its flaws.

So what is Embedded? It's a book about a burnt out journalist who gets his consciousness implanted into the mind of a soldier so he can get an insiders view of a potential story that the authorities are trying to keep hush hush. Things go wrong, as indeed they must, and he ends up fighting for his survival.

The first act is a bit slow, not so much slow as in taking its time, but slow as in you have to really work at those first 100 or so pages. The characters are introduced, there's a couple of humorous asides -such as the corporate sponsored curse word- and the world is fleshed out, but it takes too long.

The term 'first act' might in fact be a bit of a misnomer as there aren't so much three acts in the book as there are two parts. Once things have gone wrong there is no clear point where there a third act might take place. With some books there is an almost audible 'thunk' between acts, but that is not so here. That's not a point for or against the book, just a statement.

Those of you familiar with Dan Abnett will probably be aware that he has written more books set in the Warhammer 40k universe than I have hairs on my head, and that pedigree shows, once the violence starts and the lasers start pew pewing their way across the page things really get going.
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