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Elizabeth Clansham by [Chapman, Catherine E.]
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Elizabeth Clansham Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

Catherine E. Chapman is a UK-based indie author of women's fiction and romance. Her full-length books have been described as literary character fiction and her writing style said to be filmic. They are contemporary stories, in which humour is an important ingredient. Catherine also writes shorter fiction in the genre of historical romance. 'The Beacon Singer' is a novel written in three volumes. Something of a mini-saga, set in the English Lake District, a review of the book concluded, "Chapman is a very fine writer, she has wonderful talent with description, a keen eye for plot twists and pace ... There's an abundance of plot here, much like watching a mini-series," (4 star review, March 2012). 'Elizabeth Clansham' is a novella set in the Scottish Highlands. It has been said to be, "a finely-crafted tale of social interactions, of love and of finding yourself, all tied up into small-town life," (Goodreads review, Sept. 2011). "There were several scenes at which I laughed out loud ... folks who enjoy literary fiction and/or romantic fiction should enjoy it," (4 star review, March 2012). 'Brizecombe Hall' is a novelette set in England in the late Regency / early Victorian period. "Plenty of atmosphere. Shades of Jane Eyre. A good escapist story that you can lose yourself in," (4 star review). The historical novelettes, 'Danburgh Castle' and 'Rhiannon' are both Medieval romances. "The plot was tight and kept me engaged; good characterisation meant I truly cared about what was happening," (4 star review of Danburgh Castle). Novelette, 'The Hangar Dance,' is a romance set in rural England during the Second World War. 'The Ramblers' is a contemporary short story. All of Catherine's publications are available as e-books. Some are also available in print. Catherine values feedback from readers and would like to thank all those who have taken the time to read, rate, review and comment on her fiction.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1329 KB
  • Print Length: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Catherine E. Chapman; 1 edition (5 Sept. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005LFNWDG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,898,339 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Elizabeth is a writer who moves to a Highland cottage to get away from it all, to be able to concentrate on her writing. However, there's no peace to be found in a small, rural community.

Catherine spins an intricate web of relations between the local people, some romantic, others not. An interesting part near the end switches back and forth between two couples, giving a fascinating contrast between the two relationships, heightening the difference in "love" as people grow up.

Aside from the romance, it is an examination of regrets. The characters can be roughly divided into two groups, representing youth and people who have supposedly grown up. The youth are blithely making silly decisions, not too worried about the future. The adults are trying to deal with the course that they've chosen and desperately wondering if they can start afresh. They also discover that trying to escape their past is not enough.

A line I really liked that I think sums up a lot: 'It's the things you don't do in life that you regret...'

Having lived in a rural community in Scotland, I could relate really well to the story and characters, in particular the feeling that everyone knows your business and quite often judges you for better or worse.

A wonderful story of human relationships.

By Simon Hugh Wheeler, author of Loosely Translated.

*Disclosure: I have received a free copy of this book for review purposes.
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Format: Kindle Edition
My first thought about Elizabeth Clansham is that it was written in the wrong era. Take out the sex, bad language and modern references, and it would make a fine historical novel. Indeed the old-fashioned names of Miss Clansham's pupils made me keep thinking it was set many years before. The book reads like a soap opera, full of characters with inter-weaving stories and this was where I became a little confused and frustrated. To me the most interesting characters were Elizabeth herself, her relationship with her uptight neighbour, and his slutty ex-girlfriend and her long-suffering daughter, and no sooner would I start getting into their stories, then I would be disturbed by irritating schoolchildren and fledgling lesbians. I am sure the whole thing would play out far better on screen than in a book and I would recommend that Chapman considers writing for television, as to maintain a story with so many characters, without getting confusing is an admirable achievement and one I think she should take further.

For myself, I would have preferred there to be only one or two main stories running through the book, with the other characters as bit players rather than whole chunks dedicated to them. But if you don't mind this sort of storytelling then you will find Elizabeth Clansham well-written and engaging.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.2 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quite well-written, quirky, fans of literary and romantic fiction should enjoy 23 Mar. 2012
By K. Sozaeva - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Disclosure: I received a free copy of this eBook in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis from Goodreads: Elizabeth Clansham retreats to a croft house in the Scottish Highlands to write a novel and avoid real life. Reluctant teacher and aspiring author, she finds that the part-time job she has taken to fund her idyllic existence impacts upon her life more than she'd anticipated; her students are determined to find her a love-match. Will it be Angus, gamekeeper and uncle of one of Elizabeth's pupils, or Andrew, Elizabeth's reclusive neighbour in the croft?

Andrew's solitary bachelor life is turned upside-down by the arrival of his former girlfriend, Laetitia - fleeing the city of Glasgow and her mounting debts, and seeking shelter with Andrew in the hills. Will their old flame be rekindled or will Lauren, Laetitia's seven-year-old daughter, get her way and realise a father-figure in Angus?

Andrew maintains it's the things you don't do in life that you regret but is it ever too late for love to blossom?

My Thoughts: I should start out by saying I don't like romance novels. What particularly drives me mad is when the romantic couples spend most of the books hating each other, or being jerky at random for no real reason. Therefore, I'm happy to say, that was not the case here. The only ones acting like adolescents were, actually, adolescents. There were actually several scenes at which I laughed out loud, particularly some of the random discussions Elizabeth Clansham's night class would get into, as I remember starting a fair numbers of like discussions myself while in school. It also reminded me why I decided against being a teacher; I definitely would not have dealt with her classes with the patience that she showed. I rather like Angus - I guess I, like Laeticia, am a fool for a big, hairy man, and would probably especially like one who regularly supplied me with venison and steaks! *laugh* Andrew was a weird one - I couldn't decide exactly how I felt about him, and I wonder if it wouldn't have been better to develop his character a bit more, but as it was, he remained rather an enigma.

Overall, not really my type of book, although I enjoyed it well enough, but folks who enjoy literary fiction and/or romantic fiction should enjoy it quite a lot.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Would make a better TV show 9 April 2012
By Miss Karen L. Mason - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
My first thought about Elizabeth Clansham is that it was written in the wrong era. Take out the sex, bad language and modern references, and it would make a fine historical novel. Indeed the old-fashioned names of Miss Clansham's pupils made me keep thinking it was set many years before. The book reads like a soap opera, full of characters with inter-weaving stories and this was where I became a little confused and frustrated. To me the most interesting characters were Elizabeth herself, her relationship with her uptight neighbour, and his slutty ex-girlfriend and her long-suffering daughter, and no sooner would I start getting into their stories, then I would be disturbed by irritating schoolchildren and fledgling lesbians. I am sure the whole thing would play out far better on screen than in a book and I would recommend that Chapman considers writing for television, as to maintain a story with so many characters, without getting confusing is an admirable achievement and one I think she should take further.

For myself, I would have preferred there to be only one or two main stories running through the book, with the other characters as bit players rather than whole chunks dedicated to them. But if you don't mind this sort of storytelling then you will find Elizabeth Clansham well-written and engaging.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book full of loose ends 27 Sept. 2011
By T. Murrell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Elizabeth wants to write a book and isn't sure she can do it in London. So she moves to the Scotland countryside and gets a teaching job, hoping to write the book in her spare time.
She meets some interesting people and finds her writing a bit more difficult than she'd imagined.

It took me quite a while to get into the book. I couldn't get the characters straight and just couldn't get attached to Elizabeth. There are quite a few characters that run parallel with each other and only at times intersect.

But about half way through the book I figured out who was who and started enjoying the book. The ending seems to wrap up decently and yet leaves room for more if the author chooses. I could see this being a series since some of the character's stories could have been developed more or thoughts carried further.
All in all, I enjoyed this book.

I received this book free of charge in exchange for my honest review.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you are a fan of real life scenarios... 14 May 2012
By Reflections of a BookWorm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Elizabeth Clansham
By Catherine E. Chapman

Elizabeth Clansham has recently moved to a small town in the Scottish Highlands in order to pursue her writing, all the while she teaches English part time. Across from her small home lives Andrew a former pop star who drifts listlessly through life until Laetitia and her daughter Lauren arrive on his doorstep, Laetitia is fleeing Glasgow when a menacing man shows up to her flat and threatens to hurt her daughter if she does not repay her debt. Then there is Angus, the gamekeeper and father figure who has taken in his niece when her mother has abandoned her. Between the four romance begins to bloom and each of their lives is changed by the others.

This book reminded me a lot of Debbie Macomber's style of writing using real life scenarios as the focus instead of fantastical situations. If you enjoy a laid back approach to the romance genre and something more realistic than vampires or a serial killer who focuses on the main character for any number of reason you will enjoy this book. Each character goes through their own growth period and finds out who they truly are or want to be. Catherine E. Chapman managed to encompass four individuals but also Elizabeth's students into the story each one having their own romantic trysts; it was very intricate and well written I only wish there had been more conclusions to some of the individual stories, but the author does a splendid job bringing each one to life.
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I was sent a free copy of this book for review.
3.0 out of 5 stars The characters felt realistic enough but the book did feel more like a screenplay than a novel 20 Feb. 2015
By Ashley Uzzell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review.
An enjoyable read to get you through a lazy day.
The characters felt realistic enough but the book did feel more like a screenplay than a novel. It was mostly dialogue. It would have been nice to know more about how the characters felt than just what they thought and said.
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