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Eldest (The Inheritance Cycle) Hardcover – 2 Nov 2006

4.2 out of 5 stars 251 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 2 Nov 2006
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday Children's Books; New edition edition (2 Nov. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385611609
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385611602
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 6 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (251 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,476,956 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

There’s a keenness in the storytelling, and an excitement for pure adventure and magic, that will ensure fans of Paolini’s Eragon will find its much-anticipated sequel every bit as readable and captivating. This young author, who wrote that debut (very long) novel aged fifteen, has shed some his earlier less convincing turns of phrase and tendancies to homage other inspirational works, to come up with a deeper second novel that is more assured, better balanced and distinctly original.

Picking up from the exact point where its predecessor gave way, Eldest begins with dragon rider and now shade slayer, Eragon, on the battlefield of his greatest triumph. He is saddened by the death and carnage before him, and fearful for the future. King Galbatorix is, despite this battle won, still the cruel ruler of the Empire and must be defeated. Together with the beautiful and elegant dragon, Saphira, with whom he can communicate without speech, they must travel to Ellesmera – fabled land of the Elves to undergo further training in magic, swordsmanship and other worldly necessities.

Meanwhile, in his homeland, in the village of Carvahall, Eragon’s cousin Roran faces challenges of his own. The king’s men, and the dark creature that instructs them, lay siege to the tiny mountain community in the hope of finding Roran, and thus lead them to Eragon. After fierce resistance, Roran leads the villagers on a long, arduous journey to salvation (hopefully) with the community known as the Varden.

Told in alternate chapters, the stories of both young men on separate missions give this ‘difficult second novel’ a refreshing feel. Eragon is still the star, but has a substantial second cast to make this novel a worthy sequel to the first book and a tantalising bridge to the final chapter in volume three.

(Age 12 and over) --John McLay --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A compelling and action-filled adventure . . . A galloping good example of its genre" (Daily Telegraph)

"This book is an achievement. Readers will be transported" (The Sunday Times)

"A portrayal of true affection between boy and dragon . . . Paolini writes like someone gripped by his own story" (Guardian)

"A stirring fantasy of epic proportions" (The Bookseller)

"Bound for the bestsellers" (Publishing News) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The Inheritance trilogy consists of Eragon, Eldest, Empire.
Read Eragon first, you will not understand Eldest, as it is filled with infomation and parts referring to the 1st book, Eragon.
Despite critics literally screaming "this is a weak copy of the LOTR trilogy!", these 2 (and hopefully 3) books are entertaining, absorbing, and serious fantasy. The unfortunate thing about these 2 books is that they do take a lot of influence from the LOTR trilogy. From the characters (Orcs) to the writing style (similar type of writing, and so on). But, as I said in my 'Eragon' review, no-one intentionally tries to copy, resemble, or poke fun at another book, unless the author is writing a parody.
Eragon seemed a little slow and dreamy at the beginning, but Eldest thrusts you into the action the moment you start. In Eldest, you follow the stories of two people, Eragon Shadeslayer, the slayer of Durza and rider of Saphira, and Roran Garrowsen, the uncle of Eragon. Eragon decides to travel to the land of the elves (ellesmera) to train his magic and swordsmanship. But along the way there is plenty of danger, magic, fights, sarcasm, and of course, adventure. Far away, Roran must defend Carvahall from Ra'Zac and orcs who invade almost everyday, trying to find, or even collect infomation about Eragon or Roran.
The one noticable difference between Eragon and Eldest is that Poalini's writing style has changed again. His writing has become noticeably more mature and darker, depicting scenes of evil more powerfully. In Eldest, Eragon is more like a man on a mission, rather than a teenager who is trying to find a certain area. There are less carefree moments for Eragon, and more 'I must follow my destiny' determination.
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By S on 13 April 2008
Format: Paperback
I personally liked this book even better than the first, Eragon, which has been one of my definite favourites. The plot is engaging, fast moving and origional with fantasy brought to life as though reality. The characters are also brought to life - as complex individuals - and the book is difficult to put down. The subtlety in many places also makes Eldest a good read for the second or even third time, as some moments just have to be re-experienced, and you also notice things you missed before. Revealing answers are found to some of the questions posed in Eragon, whilst leaving others to be explained in the next book, Brisinger. There is also a fantastic twist at the end of Eldest, which although very surprising is utterly believable as it fits in perfectly with the rest of the story. Overall, these books are a must-read; not to be missed!
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Format: Paperback
"Eldest", second book in Christopher Paolini's "Inheritance" triology, picks up where "Eragon" ended, and allows us to know what is going to happen with Eragon, Saphira and their friends, and what they will need to do in order to survive the wrath of king Galbatorix. If you haven't read the first book in the series, please do so before tackling this one. You can understand what happens in "Eldest" without having read "Eragon", but I think you will not enjoy what happens half as much.

Now, my opinion regarding "Eldest". Truth to be told, I loved the first book in the series, but I liked this one even more. From my point of view, Paolini manages to make Eragon's world more believable, without letting the magic go. That doesn't mean that this book is perfect, or that it doesn't have some scenes that are somewhat slow. All the same, I think it deserves 5 stars because it is the kind of book you cannot stop reading once you start, the kind of book that makes you wish you could read the final book of the triology instead of having to wait for it.

What is new in "Eldest", then? Well, Eragon has to travel to Ellesmera (the land of the Elves), in order to continue his training as a dragon raider. Along the way he will meet some new friends and foes, and discover new information about people he already knew. Also, the author introduces an alternative point of view in the story, that of Roran, Eragon's cousin. Roran and Eragon are far from each other, and must to face different challenges and enemies, but they have something in common: some chapters of "Eldest" will be about Eragon's adventures, and others about what is happening to Roran and his followers.
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Format: Paperback
Don't get me wrong. I think this trilogy is excellent. But I have notice a VERY similar plot between this and... Star Wars! Yes, this story is Star Wars in a Lord of the Rings world! And it's really good! I mean think about it: Luke Skywalker lives with his uncle on a farm... So does Eragon! Luke gets a inherits a blue lightsaber and has to carry on an ancient culture... Eragon gets a blue dragon and carries on the legacy of the dragon riders! And it goes on. I'm not going to give it all though because there are some that haven't seen Star Wars (i'm not joking) and I dont want to spoil this book for them. Because although it has some major similarities it's still a great story that needs to be read.
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