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El Caballero Negro (The Black Knight)

3.5 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

Price: £15.99
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Product details

  • Actors: Alan Ladd, Patricia Medina, André Morell, Peter Cushing, Harry Andrews
  • Directors: Tay Garnett
  • Format: Import, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warwick Film Productions
  • Run Time: 81 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005PZTCYK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 89,121 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

The Black Knight (1954) - Region 2 PAL, plays in original English audio without subtitles: Official Resen Spanish Region 2 PAL DVD release as pictured. Colour. English Dolby Digital audio. Runtime 81 mins. As a blacksmith John can't hope to win the hand of Linet, daughter of the Earl of Yeonil. Off he goes to prove himself a noble knight. He makes himself a suit of armor with a winged chicken helmet and runs around fighting for King Arthur as the Black Knight. Evil doings include plots by visiting kings and a Druid sacrificial ceremony at Stonehenge.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
the black knight dvd here as been released in a widescreen format but should not be as it was not a cinema scope film
and should be 4.3 presentation 1.33 format.
The picture transfer is not a brilliant one, film 4hd had shown the film recently in a beautiful print in its correct ratio.
Also the first 1 minute and 30 seconds is missing at the beginning showing a minstrel playing a guitar and singing a song before
the opening credits.
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Format: DVD
Ah the swords and shields movie, a once thriving genre of film from yore where big bucks was thrown at the productions, and spectacle was unleashed. There were one or two exceptions, mind...

Directed by Tay Garnett, produced by Irving Allen and Albert R. Broccoli and starring Alan Ladd, Peter Cushing and a whole host of British thespians lining up for some costume shenanigans. Story is a reworking of Arthurian England, with Ladd as a brave blacksmith who reinvents himself as the Black Knight to foil a dastard plan to overthrow King Arthur, and of course to impress the Lady Linet (Patricia Medina) who he has the major hots for. Sword play, fights, swinging about, jousts and Royal machinations do follow.

In the context of its budget it's hardly the awful stinker some have lined up to proclaim it as. Oh it definitely has problems, not the least that Ladd is badly miscast and Medina just isn't good enough, but there's a great sense of fun about the whole thing. One only has to look at Cushing's performance as the villainous Sir Palamides, he's having a great old time of it prancing about in tights and smothered in so much make-up he looks like a Satsuma! If you can get into Cushing's mindset then there's fun to be had here, intentionally or otherwise!

It's very colourful, costuming is impressive and with Garnett the wise old pro not wasting any chance for an action scene - or to encourage his male cast members into macho posturing - it's never dull. True, the editing is shoddy, the script (Alec Coppel) poor and some of the choreography is amateurish, but this is medieval malarkey 101. A film for the forgiving genre fan whose after a simple hour and half of robust swordery and chastity belt tamperings. 6/10
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Format: DVD
A blacksmith (Alan Ladd) in the service of the Earl of Yeonil (Harry Andrews) is in love with the Earl's daughter (Patricia Medina). When Cornish men disguised as Vikings attack and burn the Earl's castle, the blacksmith adopts the identity of The Black Knight and attempts to foil a plan by a traitorous pagan (Patrick Troughton) and a Saracen (Peter Cushing) to usurp King Arthur's (Anthony Bushell) throne. This rather stodgy tale of knights in shining armor and damsels in distress can't stand on its own and when placed against a superior example of the genre like IVANHOE or even the lesser BLACK SHIELD OF FALWORTH, its inadequacies are glaring. Poor Alan Ladd is not only too old but he looks terrible, tired and pudgy, and he isn't helped by a disfiguring wig (at least I hope it's a wig!). As the only American in the all British cast, he's terribly out of place as a medieval knight. The only moment of real fun is a kitschy Hammeresque sequence with pagan maidens bumping and grinding around stone phallic symbols during a virgin sacrifice while friars are burned in baskets. Other than that respite, it's a rather plodding affair. Directed by Tay Garnett. With Andre Morell, Laurence Naismith and Ronald Adam.

The Spanish DVD courtesy of Llamentol is an adequate transfer which could have used some restoration work. It's in anamorphic wide screen (1.85).
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This DVD was purchased for my father and he was very pleased as he had been having difficulty finding this film in DVD format.

The quality on his video version had become bad and now he is pleased he can watch the film again.
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By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Nov. 2014
Format: DVD
What is it about those days of old when knights were bold and paper wasn't invented, that they all had American accents.....umm.....that is if you believe the Hollywood versions. Robert Taylor was a very American Lancelot in "Knights of the Round Table"(53). Even Bing Crosby turned up at Camelot as "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court"(49). Perhaps the funniest was hearing Tony Curtis's distinct Bronx accent in "The Black Shield of Falworth"(54). Not quite as unintentionally funny is Alan Ladd, old Shane himself, popping up in "The Black Knight"(54), in a film that has more resemblance to the world of Shrek than Arthurian legend. It was the last of Ladd's trilogy of films for London based Warwick Films.

This one has Ladd as the rather elderly blacksmith who has to prove himself to Arthur's knights and a very pretty young lady of course, that he has what it takes to cut the mustard amongst the ranks of those illustrious knights. Up against him are the very dastardly Peter Cushing as a spectacularly overdressed Saracen, and Patrick Troughton as a very naughty Cornish King. The Cornish may find this film offensive! The film assails us with a veritable tsunami of corn. There are a lot of extras indulging in some ultra unrealistic fighting. Things have come on since 1954! All this takes place in a smorgasbord of landscapes that does not always do justice to England's green and pleasant land. More it's scorched and arid land, as it was filmed around impressive castle locations in Spain. The `piece de resistance' is the Stonehenge sequence, with wailing druids and dancers that do a sprightly version of "Pans People", and very nice they look as well, even if to no purpose! The polystyrene looking stones, in an arid landscape, looking rather unfamiliar to this Wiltshireman!
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