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Ekaterinburg: The Last Days of the Romanovs by [Rappaport, Helen]
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Ekaterinburg: The Last Days of the Romanovs Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Length: 272 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"That perfect but rare blend of history, sense of place, human tragedy, drama and atmosphere" (Susan Hill)

"A moving and factual account of the family's last days... Helen Rappaport has brought her subjects back to life with a sombre intensity, focusing on the last fortnight of their verifiable existence in their claustrophobic mansion prison... A deeply touching anniversary tribute." (Independent on Sunday)

"Helen Rappaport follows the principal characters over the 13 days leading up to the murders. She skilfully weaves together the grimly repetitive routine of the doomed family with the high drama engulfing the killers as they added the finishing touches to their terrible plan... Rappaport's countdown format makes Ekaterinburg freshly compelling..." (New Statesman)

"Rappaport has uncovered fascinating details of the local politicking and pressures to apply a final coup de grace. She shows how Lenin was closely consulted on the decision to kill the family, but took great care to cover his links... Rappaport has succeeded in capturing a frenetic, terrifying period of modern history and showing how a brutal, but human, man and his family became victims of the pent-up fury of the people he had systematically ground underfoot." (Sunday Tribune (Ireland))

"... Well researched...Helen Rappenport successfully evokes the claustrophobic atmosphere within the house." (Saturday Telegraph)

Book Description

Telling the story in a compellingly new and dramatic way, Ekaterinburg brings the tragic final 13 days in the lives of the Romanovs vividly alive against the backdrop of a Russia in turmoil.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5404 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (2 April 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0031RDW04
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #43,196 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have just finished your book and I can not say how much I enjoyed it. One feels strangely saying so as it is a sad story by all means.

I have lots of books on the Romanovs and I was quite hesitant to buy another one. What can be possibly new about the whole subject?

But I have to admit that this excellent book gave me a new inside and you were able to separate the political side of things, from the human dimension. There is no romantic or religious vision of the final days. It is not written with a hidden agenda of glorifying the last Imperial Family. It clearly separates the politcial story that led to the downfall of the dynasty and the the human tragedy.

Helen Rappaport did not write the story - as it is ever so often - from the end. I appreciated very much how she showed the different personalities of the Imperial family and how they coped with the new situation. The personality of Alexandra, her illnesses, the illness of the Heir and how this effected all of the family long before the fall of the dynasty. The view that the isolation of the family during their reign found a sort of continuation during the confinement, but without the demands of the rule, and were partly at least from the Czar "welcome" is indeed very convincing. Her final comments hid a nerve with me. On top, I just like Helen Rappaport's style of writing.

All in all, I enjoyed this book immensely, it is fascianting, well written and gives the reader much stuff for further thought. I can only recommend this book!
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Format: Hardcover
The fate of the Romanovs is well known. Many books have been written about the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II & his family - Tsaritsa Alexandra, Tsarevich Alexey & the Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, Maria & Anastasia - many of them full of wild speculation that some of the family survived the murders in 1918. Helen Rappaport's new book focuses on the last two weeks of their lives, imprisoned in the Ipatiev House (known to their Bolshevik captors as the House of Special Purpose) in Ekaterinburg, a small town in the Urals. The book is based on extensive research among Russian sources not generally accessible to Western researchers & this is its great strength. Rappaport alternates between taking the reader inside the claustrophobic atmosphere of the Ipatiev House, as the family's horizons are narrowed to the few rooms on the first floor, circling back through time to fill in background detail on the inept rule of the Tsar which led to the upheaval of revolution, & moving to Moscow, Petrograd & London as political forces influence the family's fate. The final chapters are harrowing with the description of the family's murder & the almost farcical ineptitude of the executioners. A compulsively readable book for anyone interested in the Romanovs or Russia in the 20th century.
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Format: Hardcover
Using her extensive research of diaries, letters and eyewitness accounts, Helen Rappaport draws together the strands of this story to write an utterly compelling account of the last days of the Imperial Family.

Set against the backdrop of war, revolution, and factional fighting amongst the Bolsheviks she explains how, after the Tsar's abdication, the Imperial family finally come to be imprisoned in the Impatiev House in Ekaterinburg, chillingly referred to as The House of Special Purpose. The house which has been turned into a prison, shut off from the outside world by a wooden palisade.

Helen really conveys the feeling of doom as the Tsar, the Tsaritsa and their daughter Maria enter the house on April 30th 1918, the other children following later when Alexy, the Tsarevich, has recovered from an attack of haemophilia. She describes how, for the next few weeks, the family and their servants endure the stifling heat, the oppressive atmosphere and lack of privacy of their apartment, cut off from the outside world, the windows sealed shut and whitewashed over.

She draws such intimate and detailed portraits of Nicholas, Alexandra and the children, that the family come vividly to life as they cope with their confinement. The Tsar resigned, Alexandra in constant pain, comforted by her daughters and her strong orthodox faith. The four Grand Duchesses, as they learn to wash their clothes, scrub floors and bake bread. Serious Olga, practical Tatiana, caring Maria and mischievous Anastasia, and Alexy, their brother, frail and sickly, playing soldiers with the kitchen boy Leonid Sednev.

The arrival of a new commandant Yakov Yurovsky on July 4th heralds a much harsher regime for the prisoners. The sense of foreboding intensifies in the house.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have just finished your book and I can not say how much I enjoyed it. One feels strangely saying so as it is a sad story by any means.

I have lots of books on the Romanovs and I was quite hesitant to buy another one. What can be possibly new about the whole subject?

But I have to admit that this excellent book gave me a new inside and you were able to separate the political side of things, from the human dimension. There is no romantic or religious vision of the final days. It is not written with a hidden agenda of glorifying the last Imperial Family. It clearly separates the politcial story that led to the downfall of the dynasty and the the human tragedy.

Helen Rappaport did not write the story - as it is ever so often - from the end. I appreciated very much how she showed the different personalities of the Imperial family and how they coped with the new situation. The personality of Alexandra, her illnesses, the illness of the Heir and how this effected all of the family long before the fall of the dynasty. The view that the isolation of the family during their reign found a sort of continuation during the confinement, but without the demands of the rule, and were partly at least from the Czar "welcome" is indeed very convincing. Her final comments hid a nerve with me. On top, I just like Helen Rappaport's style of writing.

All in all, I enjoyed this book immensely, it is fascianting, well written and gives the reader much stuff for further thought. I can only recommend this book!
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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