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Einstein's Clocks and Poincare's Maps Hardcover – 18 Aug 2003

2.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Sceptre (18 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034079447X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340794470
  • Package Dimensions: 20.1 x 14 x 3.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,189,249 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

‘Deeply rewarding... Galison’s profound scholarship is evident on every page, continually offering fresh insights and perspectives’ -- Sunday Telegraph, 31 August 2003

About the Author

Peter Galison was educated at Cambridge (MPhil in Philosophy of Science) and Harvard (BA, MA and PhD) universities. He has taught at Stanford Uiversity and is currently the Mallinckrodt Professor of History of Science and of Physics at Harvard.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a good history of the evolution of time in the modern age
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Format: Paperback
If you read and enjoyed Longitude, and wanted to know what happened next, this is the book to read. The book is not perfect, but the other reviewers here are unduly negative. The book deserves to be much better known and more widely read. Chapters 2-5 are well written, accessible popular science, and tell a great story.

My advice to readers:
Skip chapter 1 - relativity is better covered elsewhere, and this chapter is hard going (as another reviewer hinted). However, you do need to know that Poincare almost managed to develop a version of relativity before Einstein.
Read chapter 2 - the story of Poincare's non-mathematical work is very relevant, is interesting in its own right, and is presented here in a very accessible form.
Read chapters 3 and 4 - a terrific presentation on the emergence of global time and an insight into the nationalist politics from the French perspective led by Poincare (less well known - since Greenwich won the argument and this is the history we remember).
Read Chapter 5 - which highlights Einstein's non-mathematical activities (not well represented in other Einstein books), and illustrates what is perhaps one of the more surprising outcomes of the events recorded in chapters 2-5.
Skip Chapter 6, unless you are interested in the author's more usual territory in science studies.
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By A Customer on 17 Feb. 2004
Format: Hardcover
I was slow to warm to this book, but the further I read, the more gripped I became.
It's astonishing how recently time was coordinated between rail companies and then around the world, and how physically difficult it was to map places like Peru and West Africa. Let alone agree how far Paris is from London.
I was inspired by the book to read some more about Einstein and time.
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