£16.95 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by EliteDigital UK
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Plastic Dreams
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Disc & packaging in new condition. Fast dispatch from the UK.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£23.51
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: all my music
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Ein Deutsches Requiem Op 45/Masur And Nypo

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

Price: £16.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.
3 new from £16.95 9 used from £2.11
£16.95 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Audio CD (9 Oct. 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Teldec
  • ASIN: B000000SR1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 702,930 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. I Selig sind, die da leid tragen
  2. II Denn alles Fleisch, es ist wie Gras
  3. III Herr, lehre doch mich - Hakan Hagegard/Westminster Sym Cho
  4. IV Wie lieblich sind Deine Wohnungen, Herr Zeboath
  5. V Ihr habt nun Traurighket - Sylvia Mcnair/Westminter Sym Chor
  6. IV Denn wei haben hie deine bleibende Statt - Hakan Hagegard/Westminter Sym Chor
  7. VII Selig sind die Toten, die in dem Herren sterben

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 23 Sept. 2012
Very few recordings adhere literally Brahms' metronome markings but at just over the hour this performance is the fastest I know. Many other recordings routinely take anything from 65 to even 75 minutes; as such, Masur's live performance here is of interest because it is takes the risk of attempting to be more faithful to the composer's apparent intentions. It is an interpretation which through its fleetness and lightness of touch evidently wishes to bring to the fore the qualities of compassion and consolation which Brahms himself underlined in his declaration that the word "German" in the Requiem's title could easily be substituted by "human".

The danger is that it could come across as glib, diminishing the essential gravity of the piece. I do not find that to be the case: if anything this is a viable alternative to the more monolithic or even morbid interpretations which have stood the test of time. I am not saying that it is time for Klemperer, Karajan, Levine or Previn to move over and I am certainly not necessarily endorsing the Brahms-lite of Gardiner or Norrington, but this recording is a wholly valid antidote to more portentous versions. No doubt being freed from the rigid performance tradition of East Germany encouraged Masur to be innovative in his approach to speed and rhythms.

Despite it being a speciality, Masur could on occasion be dull and uninspired in performances of Brahms' music during his tenure with the New York Philharmonic. One reviewer even went so far as describe performances of the symphonies and Requiem as "soporific". Not so here; this has lift and spring - it is even brisk in parts, such is his desire to keep the music moving.
Read more ›
3 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 10 reviews
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great tempos 18 Nov. 2000
By Bryan Park - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I have to agree that this recording has the best tempos of the Brahms Requiem I have heard on CD. Most of the other recordings, including Robert Shaw's, and surprisingly, even John Eliot Gardiner's, clock in at around 70 minutes. This means that #2 ("Denn alles Fleisch") especially tends to be sluggish. Masur takes a tempo that is just fast enough not to be plodding, but not so fast that the movement loses its inherent dignity.

Another movement that tends to be sluggish in most recordings is #4 ("Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen"). Here, it lilts. It never feels rushed, yet it still has room to breathe.

This recording is almost exactly 60 minutes long. There is still, however, a wide variation of tempo. #6 ("Denn wir haben hie") is especially masterful. It actually starts slower than some of the 70-minute recordings. Then when the fast section comes ("Denn es wird die posaune schallen"), the contrast is remarkable. This is definitely one of the better recordings available of this work, if not the best.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Germanic Meaningful 16 April 2000
By VonStupp - Published on Amazon.com
I have always appreciated Brahms’ daring setting of a Requiem in comparison to his contemporaries in other countries for a number of reasons: 1. Its eschewal of the traditional Latin mass liturgy and use of the German language marks Germany’s strong ties to the Lutheran church and distance from the Roman Catholic settings, 2. Its brevity makes sure the music doesn’t outstay its welcome while still providing a wholly emotional experience, 3. Its prayer-like piousness certainly stands against the Verdi Requiem and Berlioz Requiem, although Masur’s interpretation in tempo certainly creates energy focused on a nervous, supplicative urgency that isn’t present in the many languorous recordings available, and 4. Brahm’s persistent use of pedal points, hemiola, imitative or fugal choral work, winds vs. strings orchestrations, and balanced use of soloists vs. chorus are all a nice change even in comparison to Dvorak’s 90-minute devotional Requiem setting.

As to Masur’s interpretation, it has certainly caused a rift in its listeners, but for me has given the work a much needed breath of fresh air. Even the top three search results for this work, Sir Georg Solti (who is well known for taking pressed, speedy tempos), the buoyant James Levine, and Andre Previn time in between 70-80 minutes in performance time, whereas Kurt Masur (not usually known for his urgent recordings) and the New York Philharmonic come in at 60-minutes flat. As interpretations go, I dig this one, and as contentious as it might be, the increase in tempo creates some new moods, especially in Mvt. 2, 3, and 6, which give the text new meaning to me. How Lovely Are Thy Dwelling Places is presented here more as Viennese, mild urgency and flowing undercurrents dramatize the baritone movements without any sense of a manic pace, and none of the singing seems to be affected at all, even in the difficult contrapuntal sections. Most importantly to me, there are no over-romanticized ruminations presented here, which plagues many recordings of Brahm’s works, and Masur is able to keep the thick, Brahmsian textures and singing phrases alive and does not venture into period-instrument classicism.

I love the soloists Sylvia McNair and Hakan Hagegard, both of whom elevated the performance of Slatkin's Carmina Burana, and it is much the same here. Brahms makes sure the soloists do not outshine the chorus as in Verdi, nor are the soloists underutilized as in Berlioz; McNair’s silky interpretation and Hagegard’s dramatic, solid tone throughout his range make this recording stand out from others. The Westminster Chorus, under the great Flummerfelt, is sturdy, confident, and professional, and does not show any kinks in their singing regardless of the ranges Brahms throws at them; their German diction is crisp, dynamics and articulations are often emphatic but well-judged, and best of all, they are an equal partner of the New York Philharmonic both in musicianship and in the sonic layout of the recording. I would heartily recommend this recording of A German Requiem if you can try out a new interpretation that breathes new life into an old warhorse; for this listener it worked, excellent performance and all!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fleet and consoling 23 Sept. 2012
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Very few recordings adhere literally Brahms' metronome markings but at just over the hour this performance is the fastest I know. Many other recordings routinely take anything from 65 to even 75 minutes; as such, Masur's live performance here is of interest because it is takes the risk of attempting to be more faithful to the composer's apparent intentions. It is an interpretation which through its fleetness and lightness of touch evidently wishes to bring to the fore the qualities of compassion and consolation which Brahms himself underlined in his declaration that the word "German" in the Requiem's title could easily be substituted by "human".

The danger is that it could come across as glib, diminishing the essential gravity of the piece. I do not find that to be the case: if anything this is a viable alternative to the more monolithic or even morbid interpretations which have stood the test of time. I am not saying that it is time for Klemperer, Karajan, Levine or Previn to move over and I am certainly not necessarily endorsing the Brahms-lite of Gardiner or Norrington, but this recording is a wholly valid antidote to more portentous versions. No doubt being freed from the rigid performance tradition of East Germany encouraged Masur to be innovative in his approach to speed and rhythms.

Despite it being a speciality, Masur could on occasion be dull and uninspired in performances of Brahms' music during his tenure with the New York Philharmonic. One reviewer even went so far as describe performances of the symphonies and Requiem as "soporific". Not so here; this has lift and spring - it is even brisk in parts, such is his desire to keep the music moving. I would describe the prevailing mood of Masur's direction as propulsive and underpinned by a refreshing element of tension; the only place where I found proceedings to feel rushed was in the second fugue in the sixth, penultimate movement.

The fugue in the third movement is a triumph, however. This was the location for the infamous disaster of the first performance, when the timpanist, misunderstanding the intent of Brahms' marking "sempre con tutta la forza", pounded away throughout, obliterating the other instruments and causing the audience to hiss in disapproval. No such problem here: Masur artfully balances the simplicity of the soloists' plaintive melodies against the terrified and terrifying polyphonic outbursts of the choir, building to a stirring peroration.

Indeed, that harried second fugue apart, everything is judged very nicely. The sombre opening, shorn of upper strings, is intense yet we are not allowed to forget that the prevailing note is one of joy and blessedness and the gentle woodwind very well tuned, adding to the serenity of mood. The grim Dance of Death - almost a macabre sarabande - of "Denn alles Fleisch" is superbly shaped, Masur's treatment of the dotted notes in the lilting three-quarter-time passages providing more than a hint of consolation, likewise the "Wie lieblich sind Deine Wohnungen" is almost tripping and smiling. Håken Hagegård's vehement baritone is a little dry and light and the vibrato has marginally loosened since his recording for Levine in 1983 but it is still a powerful, focused sound without too much recourse to barking. I continue to prefer the darker-voiced José van Dam or Samuel Ramey - or even Hagegård's younger self. The muted strings of "Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit" are meltingly beautiful. Sylvia McNair's contribution will seem a little earthbound given that she must inevitably be compared with ethereally-voiced exponents of this aria such as Gundula Janowitz, Margaret Price, Kathleen Battle, Barbara Hendricks and Barbara Bonney; in such formidable company she is adequate: unfussy but undistinguished.

The articulation and dynamic shading of the choir are excellent; they are mostly very homogeneous, the odd stray sibilants notwithstanding. Their attack on "Aber des Herrn Wort" could be keener but they make up for that by the clarity of their enunciation in "und Schmerz und Seufzen" and the fierce momentum of "Tod, wo ist dein Stachel?"

The problematic Avery Fisher Hall acoustic is a bit dull, dead and bass-heavy but not damagingly so. Instruments and voices are very well balanced and there are very few coughs. One press review of the live performance complained of the "ugly" sound made by the electronic organ every time it entered - it plays during about a third of the work - but the recording seems to have tamed that obtrusiveness and its prolonged tonal pedals provide the necessary gravitas.

All in all, this is a worthy alternative to the plethora of recordings available, constituting something a little different.

NB: this is now available on a bargain "Apex" label issue.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best versions of Brahms' Requiem available 19 Oct. 2002
By John Kwok - Published on Amazon.com
I must admit that this is one of the fastest versions of Brahms' "Ein Deutsches Requiem" I've heard but it is also among the best. Masur's choice of tempi seem absolutely right and his command of the New York Philharmonic is as splendid as always. Under his baton the orchestra gives one of its finest live recordings during his tenure as the orchestra's music director. Sylvia McNair's solos are exquisite, replete with much lyrical phrasing and warmth. However, the true stars of this recording are most definitely the Westminister Choir. Those interested in a splendid recent recording of this work will not be disappointed.
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Masur and a good Brahms but not great in the most transcendental and transformational sense. 27 Mar. 2016
By peter cates - Published on Amazon.com
Masur conducted a good but not great performance here. It is one I also hope to return to one day. For me, the better German Requiems are Klemperer/Angel, Kempe/EMI, Solti early 50's on Capitol, and Karajan 60'S DG set- a powerful, eloquent approach in each set through the individualistic but convincingly Brahmsian lens of the 4 conductors.
For Masur's best Brahms conducting, the Leipzig cycle from the late seventies on Phillips should be snapped up before it disappears.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


Look for similar items by category


Feedback