Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.99

Save £5.00 (56%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for £0.00
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Eccles Cakes: An Odd Tale of Survival by [Fryer, Jonathan]
Kindle App Ad

Eccles Cakes: An Odd Tale of Survival Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£3.99

Length: 190 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited: Introducing Best-selling Magazines
Read the latest issues of popular magazines on Kindle. Start your free 30-day trial
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 720 KB
  • Print Length: 190 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01II737EM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #504,892 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A delightfully open memoir of his childhood days. And it’s also highly detailed. You get to know what he had to eat/had to wear etc. as well as the more important and formative aspects of his early life – the distant step father and step mother and the rather strange relationships they had with each other. (Spoiler alert) You also get to hear about the weird sexual interference practiced on him by the step father and how it affected him.
Written light fluent prose, it’s easy to read and gives you a very good insight onto a troubled childhood, and the adjustments to society he had to make in his teenaged years – coping with others at school and abroad on his first travels. I only wanted the book to extend beyond his boyhood and see how he managed to cope with life and make such a literary success of it.
I was surprised at how unlike it is to his usual books – among which are masterful biographies of Oscar Wilde, Dylan Thomas and Cristopher Isherwood – all these are really worth reading if you want to understand the characters.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Courage. That is the word that kept recurring in my mind as I read this powerful insight into Jonathan Fryer's troubled childhood. Courage in writing it. Courage in dealing with the abuse he suffered. Courage in throwing himself onto the chaos and danger of a war zone on his own resources at the age of 19.
It is a shocking story but often also a heartwarming one as it shows how he triumphed over everything that was thrown at him. He never hides the grim reality of his life at home but skilfully manages to avoid excessive self-pity by restricting it to the occasional flashback insight into his feelings at the time.
It is a brave, engaging and positive story of one man's escape from the sort of childhood no-one should ever have to suffer.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a beautifully written book, but in in two very distinct halves. The first half, which I found stunningly moving, recounts the author's lonely childhood and sense of isolation arising from a mixture of sexual abuse from his adoptive father and general emotional distance from both adoptive parents. It is written with little sense of self-pity, but just confusion of a little boy not understanding what is happening to him. The second half drops the introspective tone and recounts the author's travels in the Far East in the late 1960s. I felt frustrated by the move from emotional intensity to day-to-day travel experiences which might have happened to anyone, although it is, of course, the same person - and presumably influences the remainder of his life. Aside from the fact that we know the author became a successful journalist, we do not really resolve how he came to terms with his personal history and developed a true sense of self. Nonetheless, the book as a whole leaves a powerful impact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The formative years of childhood are seldom expressed more graphically than in the bucolic style of Laurie Lee's 'Cider with Rosie', so it is only with increasing honesty of the present age and the skill of this author can we finally face up to the more important realities.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover