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The Eagle's Brood (The Camulod Chronicles) Mass Market Paperback – 16 Jul 1998

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 629 pages
  • Publisher: St Martin's Press; 1st Mass Market Ed edition (16 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812551400
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812551402
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 3.5 x 0.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 797,478 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

" From the building blocks of history and the mortar of reality, Jack Whyte has built Arthur's world, and showed us the bone beneath the flesh of legend."--Diana Gabaldon
" The very best storytellers keep their readers glued to the story with plot, character, and a keen sense of the dramatic. . . . Whyte breathes life into the Arthurian myths by weaving the reality of history into it." --Tony Hillerman


“From the building blocks of history and the mortar of reality, Jack Whyte has built Arthur's world, and showed us the bone beneath the flesh of legend."--Diana Gabaldon
“The very best storytellers keep their readers glued to the story with plot, character, and a keen sense of the dramatic. . . . Whyte breathes life into the Arthurian myths by weaving the reality of history into it.”--Tony Hillerman


"From the building blocks of history and the mortar of reality, Jack Whyte has built Arthur's world, and showed us the bone beneath the flesh of legend."--Diana Gabaldon

"The very best storytellers keep their readers glued to the story with plot, character, and a keen sense of the dramatic. . . . Whyte breathes life into the Arthurian myths by weaving the reality of history into it."--Tony Hillerman


From the building blocks of history and the mortar of reality, Jack Whyte has built Arthur's world, and showed us the bone beneath the flesh of legend. "Diana Gabaldon"

The very best storytellers keep their readers glued to the story with plot, character, and a keen sense of the dramatic. . . . Whyte breathes life into the Arthurian myths by weaving the reality of history into it. "Tony Hillerman""

From the building blocks of history and the mortar of reality, Jack Whyte has built Arthur's world, and showed us the bone beneath the flesh of legend. Diana Gabaldon

The very best storytellers keep their readers glued to the story with plot, character, and a keen sense of the dramatic. . . . Whyte breathes life into the Arthurian myths by weaving the reality of history into it. Tony Hillerman

"

About the Author

Jack Whyte is a Scots-born, award-winning Canadian author whose poem, The Faceless One, was featured at the 1991 New York Film Festival. The Camulod Chronicles is his greatest work, a stunning retelling of one of our greatest legends: the making of King Arthur's Britain. He lives in British Columbia, Canada.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Jack Whyte was born and raised in Scotland, but has lived in Canada for the last forty odd years. He is the author of the Camulod series of books and has just had published the first in a trilogy about probably the most famous Order of knights, ever to come through the pages of history, the Knights Templar.

This is the third volume in the continuation of the Camulod Chronicles a series of novels about the Arthurian legends. But anyone expecting the conventional,or Hollywood slant on the legend of Arthur, i.e. knights riding around on destriers in full body armour, something invented several hundred years after Arthur had gone to his grave, if he ever existed at all, will be in for a sharp shock.

The books are set in the 5th century AD a much more likely time for Arthur to have existed, a time when Britain, although free of the Romans, who had gone back across the channel to Rome, was still very much influenced by the occupation. Caius Merlyn Britannicus is now leader of the colony, responsible not only for law and order but also the safety of all within its confines. Uther Pendragon is a warrior attached to the colony. Both men are on friendly terms, that is until there is an event that drives a wedge between the two men . . .

If you have read the first two books, you cannot help but want to read this one. If you have not read or cannot get the first two books, this books is a fine novel on its own merits.
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By A Customer on 14 Nov. 1998
Format: Hardcover
Reading Whyte's work at this point is like watching a train wreck -- you can't turn your eyes away even when you want to. Continuing in his "one crisis after another" school of writing, nothing makes sense if one sits back and thinks about it for any length of time. The characters are dull and monolithic; the setting forced; the events contrived. His obsession with sex scenes that the characters detest is getting on my nerves. If his characters hate these events so much, why do they keep appearing? There are so many points where logic would demand that his whole colony fall apart due to internal disorder (not to mention woefully inadequate resources and manpower) that the mind fails to comprehend how it could possibly survive. History and historicity are thrown out the window; the basis of the legends is forgotten. Whyte fails in these books on all counts and yet, like the Mack Bolan books, will continue to be popular with those who only want impossible adventure and pointless escapades. Expect to turn your mind off when you read these books -- it will be safer for you.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was first introduced to the tales of King Arthur, whose realm is made magical by the intriguing wizard Merlin at six or seven. And in my teens I was very much impressed by the 1981 John Boorman movie Excalibur starring Helen Mirren, Nigel Terry and Nicol Williamson, starring a rather sinister and hard to like Merlin. Later I saw the more sympathetic Merlin in the highly engaging 1998 TV series Merlin starring Sam Neil. Have read Queen of Camelot by Nancy McKenzie which I loved and its sequels. The mediocre Pendragon cycle by Stephen Lawhead, the intriguing if drawn out Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley, the Bernard Cornwell Arthur trilogy and the somewhat disappointing Guenevere, Queen of the Summer Country by Rosalind Miles. Mary Stewart's Arthurian Saga is an absolute epic as good as Tolkien, together with Nancy McKenzie's works they are my very favourite historical fantasy series.

I had not read any of the previous books in the Camulod Chronicles but Eagle's Brood is a great stand alone novel.
This retelling is rich on history, dispels with actual magic in the sense of sorcery but does include some premonitions and telepathic knowledge through dreams, something intelligent people know to exist.

Merlyn as Caius Merlynus Britannicus grows up with his cousin Uther Pendragon in the self contained colony of Camulod in Britain, a former Roman town, soon after the Romans have left Britain. Britain is threatened by SAxons, Angles, Jutes and Danes from the continent in the East, Picts from Caledonia the North and Irish and Scots from Hibernia to the West . Uther and Merlyn are of Roman patrilineage and Celtic matrilineage. Merlyn is the narrator of the story speaking in first person.
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Format: Hardcover
There is one horrifying thing about this book - that is the year or so we'll probably have to wait for the fourth (and final?) volume of the cycle. "Eagles' Brood" brings the whole Arthurian legend to light, filling in the gaps, providing fascinating details and characters you can't help but care about. Added to the mix are compelling sub-plots on theological struggles in the early Christian church, innovations in weaponry and warfare, and life in a self-contained community. I have loved the whole series so far, and highly recommend it (and as a personal note the the Author... PLEASE, write more, and soon!)
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is set in the era after the Romans had departed from British shores. Left without any governing force, or defence system Britain had become a land open to invasion from abroad and of internal strife between the warlords/kings of different areas.
The main character is Merlyn, whose family descend from the Roman military and whose cousin is Uther Pendragon. Merlyn follows in his father's footsteps to become a main force in the affairs of a colony called Camulod in the South of England.
The book is one of a series which sets out to give an historical backdrop to the tale of King Arthur and Merlyn.
I'm not sure that I personally can accept that the figure of Merlyn portrayed in the book bears any relation to the Merlyn of legend. However, this doesn't prevent it from being a good story.
On the whole I enjoyed the book and learned much that I didn't know. Further it has awakened in me an interest in that era of history, which held no interest for me before.
The only downside, I think, is the amount of killing portrayed. Though this is no doubt realistic it does rather remind one of the utter futility of life...a point taken up to some degree later, when Lucanus dies in "The Fort at the Rivers Bend".
My compliments to the author for his painstakingly detailed account. Good value for money.
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