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The Eagle and the Wolves (Eagles of the Empire 4) Hardcover – 4 Aug 2003

4.6 out of 5 stars 157 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Headline; First Edition edition (4 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755301137
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755301133
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 23.9 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (157 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 346,368 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Scarrow's [novels] rank with the best' (Independent)

Rollicking good fun (Mail on Sunday)

Simon Scarrow's stories of Roman military action in Britain have gathered quite a fan club and it's not hard to see why... Scarrow is highly skilled at describing violent action... for those who like their historical fiction to include plenty of bloody thrills and spills, Scarrow's latest book will prove irresistible' (Living History)

Book Description

The fourth in this gripping Roman series sees veteran officer Macro and newly-appointed centurion Cato face the greatest test of their army careers yet - 'I really don't need this kind of competition... It's a great read' Bernard Cornwell

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By J. Chippindale TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Dec. 2004
Format: Paperback
The Roman Legions are now well entrenched in Britain, but are still finding dogged resistance from the fearsome natives. Macro and Cato find themselves standing between victory and bloody defeat.
Cato is newly appointed to the rank of Centurion and it falls to him and Macro to provide an army of untrained recruits for the aged ruler Verica.
With an army of raw recruits can they halt the progress of a cunning opponent and plotters who are eager not only to destroy Macro and Cato but the whole of the Roman army.
Simon Scarrow has a wonderful feel for the period he writes about and his characters endear themselves to you the reader. These books are well researched and for anyone interested in this period of Britain's history are a great read. Fact mixed with fiction in the best possible way.
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Format: Paperback
The same people, setting and ingredients as the 3 previous novels in the series but Scarrow brings it all together flawlessly. If you love action-packed historical novels can't go wrong with this one. Thanks again Simon!
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By JPS TOP 100 REVIEWER on 15 April 2016
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is book 4 of Simon Scarrow’s “Eagle of the Empire” series. The first phase of the conquest of Britain has ended but Caradoc, the chief of the Catuvellani and heart of the resistance against Rome has escaped capture and retreated to the North-West (to what is now Wales) with the remnants of his army. The bulk of the Roman forces with Aulus Plautius have advanced to confront him while Vespasian (and Macro and Cato) with the Second Legion have “pacified” the South-West and taken dozens of hill-top forts and towns in the process. The problem is that the Roman supply lines have become extended and the territory behind the lines is far from being totally subdued.

The story begins as Cato and Macro are recovering (especially Cato, grievously wounded in the previous episode) at Calleva, the Roman rear base and supply depot. The King of the Atrebates – Verica (a historical character) is pro-Roman but not all of the Atrebates are and many fought against the Romans. Because the Romans cannot spare enough soldiers to garrison Calleva, Cato and Macro are tasked with forming and training two cohorts of auxiliaries out of the Attrebate warriors, cohorts which will fight hard and give their best against the common enemy.

This is probably one my favourites titles in the whole series. It includes the usual themes developed by Simon Scarrow, such as the rough bantering and friendship of the comrade-in-arms Cato and Macro and the usual desperate fighting. One valuable element with this is to make the story more plausible and to show that the conquest of Britain was no “walk in the park”. Resistance was fierce and Romans suffered setbacks, as shown in the book. It also helps to explain why it took so long (about a decade) to subdue only the southern part of Britain.
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Format: Hardcover
It might seem a bit premature to state that Simon Scarrow is a master of the historical novel genre. After all his series of novels set in the Roman legions numbers only four books, and as far as I am aware these are the only novels he has had published. But the quality of his writing really shines form the first page. Each book has opened with a pacy introduction to the ancient world and this latest is no exception. Our heroes, the brilliant but self-conscious Cato and the irrepressibly soldier-like Macro, are ordered to raise a private army to enfore the will of the ailing Atrebatan king, Verica. His court is riddled with plotters thirsting to be the new king. Outside the walls of the Atrebatan capital, enemy raiders are razing his kingdom. It is up to Macro and Cato to ensure that this vital ally to the Roman cause is kept safe and kept onside.
As ever the plotting is flawlessly involving, the action makes you feel as if you were there in the thick of battle and the characterisation makes you feel as if you know these men like old friends. The writing is crisp, punchy and occasionally striking in its preciseness and deployment of wit.
Christmas is coming. Now you know what to put at the top of the list when you write to Santa!
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By RR Waller TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
BRIEF STORY DETAILS - SLIGHT SPOILERS

44 AD, and in south-west Britain Vespasian, commander of the Second Legion, Centurion Macro and newly appointed centurion Cato in the thick of the fighting. Verica and his Atrebatans align with Rome but revolt against the invasion spreads. Macro and Cato fight for their lives as a Rome itself is threatened by political plot

SAFE READING _ NO SPOILERS

I have read all the "Eagle" series in order, followed the careers of Cato and Macro with great interest and eagerly await the already pre-ordered "Praetorian".
Not the heights of Literature (nor pretending to be), but well-written nevertheless, the series is filled with his great depth of knowledge, enthusiasm for and interest in the Romans.
Cunningly peopled with all the names from our history lessons - Vespasian, Cladius, Caratacus, Boudica - and the Roman campaigns to extend the Empire but centred on two Roman soldiers who become unlikely close friends, Macro and Cato, their careers and friendship carries the stories along. Following them closely allows the intimate details of human life to be in the forefront while the everyday lives of Roman soldiers and the political intrigues of the Roman Empire provide the backdrop.

PS I found it helpful to have a one-page list of Roman army ranks, which I used as a bookmark, and I had the odd glance at ancient maps (not mine I hasten to add!).
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