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The ECG Made Easy by [Hampton, John R.]
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The ECG Made Easy Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

"The ECG Made Easy has for some time been the pocket reference for junior doctors... invaluable in a clinical setting." -- Nursing Standard

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4471 KB
  • Print Length: 192 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 4 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Churchill Livingstone; 7 edition (11 Jun. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005AV98BQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #340,105 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is the book that's generally recommended to Leeds students who are baffled by the ECG and the squiggles on the page. This pocket sized book takes relatively little time to read through, and guides you though the very basics of interpretation from the cardiac axis to arrythmias and ischemic changes.

However, you will have to look elsewhere when confronted with management of the conditions described within. For example, you'll be able to interpret the ECG of atrial fibrillation, but the book won't tell you why this is significant, or your subsequent management of the condition (granted a good medical textbook will give you this information, but I'd have preferred to have the decisions section described alongside the various interpretation of arrthmias.

Gripes aside, 'ECG Made Easy' meets its main aims quite comfortably- a few reads, and at the very least, you'll approach ECGs in a logical, systematic manner. The rest comes with practice on the wards.
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Format: Paperback
One of the most popular introductory texts on this subject. All the basic concepts for understanding this topic are included, though there could be more emphasis on possible areas of confusion; such as the difference between 'leads' and 'wires'. This book also suffers from only being pocket sized and having pocket sized tracings, and on pages that depict limb and chest leads the layout could be improved to show that they are separate groups. For a newcomer to this subject you may not find it all that easy, as the explanations may need some practical demonstrations from an accomplished teacher with topics such as the cardiac axis. However this book does avoid the jargon and physiology that can be off putting in most other introductory texts. If this book leaves you with further questions, you would probably also need and indeed benefit from the author's two other titles 'The ECG in practice' and '100 ECG problems'. This would enable you to improve your skills of interpretation, and the three titles bought over time would provide an adequate inexpensive reference shelf for most health care workers. The ECG is never easy to understand for beginners, but this book does at least try.
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Format: Paperback
Interpreting ECGs is difficult, at least at the start, for most medical students. This book doesn't quite make ECGs easy but it does help to provide a reasonable introduction into how to begin understanding what the little lines and squiggles mean.

It starts off with basic info on the rate, rhythm and axis of ECGs then has a chapter on each of the main arrhythmias you'll come across. Some of the very basics in chapter one are not described very well (in particular, the cardiac axis paragraphs), occasionally lacking clarity and depth but they do use plenty of pictures to demonstrate what they are explaining to you and after a couple of reads you will begin to see what they are getting at.

Others have commented that the book could do with some more clinical details but I disagree - you should have a medical text book containing a section on cardiology already. I see it as a bonus that this pocket-sized book limits itself to the difficult enough topic of interpreting ECGs.

Lastly, there are 10 practice ECGs at the end for you to test yourseslf on, with answers explained fully.

Overall, I found it to be a useful book that can give you a reasonable introduction as to how to start reading, interpreting and presenting ECGs to your colleagues. It was great for last minute cramming before OSCE-type exams (at GKT anyway!), and should be good for anyone who doesn't have a kindly cardiologist who wants to teach you how to read them him/herself!
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Format: Paperback
Having worked in the CCU of a major teaching hospital for 10 years and taught their interpretation for about five years, I find you can almost always spot the students who have used 'ECG's Made Easy'. They are usually far more baffled than those who haven't read it! Other reviewers have already pointed out the lack of clarity, confusing points and major generalisations.

What concerns me, are the (admittedly small) number of students who read this book and then consider themselves able to interpret ECG's. It can be much harder to teach those who have preconceived ideas instilled by this book.

If you want an introduction to the ECG, look around a little. There are a number of genuinely excellent books on the market Introduction to 12-Lead ECG: The Art of Interpretation (Garcia, Introduction to 12-Lead ECG) suitable for doctors, nurses, paramedics and associated HCP's. Ideas on both ECG interpretation and teaching / learning methods have come a long way since the introduction of this book.

A good book together with experience of interpreting real ECG's in the clinical setting will stand you in good stead.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book from start to finish over two days. For me, it's the perfect balance between offering enough information to read ECGs competently without being overwhelming. I disagree with the comments critisising the book for not offering management information. I think it makes perfect sense to first learn how to find the changes, and then learn how to manage them.

The best part about this book is that it's short, and thus non-intimidating! You can read it in a weekend and by the end, you'll be well on your way to understanding ECGs. From there, you can pick up ECG problems books and try to interpret them, then refer back to the book when you get stuck. I also disagree that it's too basic. I think if you know everything in this book (which is achievable), you'd know by far enough to pass basic medical exams.
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