Buy Used
£7.74
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

EC Competition Law: Text, Cases & Materials: Text, Cases and Materials Paperback – 25 Oct 2007

3.8 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 25 Oct 2007
£87.03 £4.89

There is a newer edition of this item:

click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 1528 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 3 edition (25 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199299048
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199299041
  • Product Dimensions: 24.6 x 7.4 x 19.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,136,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Review from previous edition: "The cases are excellent: the right mix of facts, judgement and comment." --Erika Szyszczak, Professor of Law, University of Leicester

About the Author

Alison Jones is Reader in Law at King's College London. Brenda Sufrin is Professor of Law at the University of Bristol.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The master course on competition law that is taught at my university relies primarily on the relevant legal sources (the Treaties, regulations, Commission guidelines, etc)--not literature. I felt that I needed a book that provides me with sufficient background information on any specific issue; the more comprehensive, the better. Jones and Sufrin satisfies this need.

The book is very comprehensive and covers not only competition law itself, but also the underlying political, social and, in particular, economic concepts and rationales. It relies heavily on case law and additional sources, but also takes legal practice into account, which makes it sometimes less academic (and perfect for my course). It is also one of the few of its kind that is up to date and `Lisbon proof'.

However, I should point out that the structure is sometimes indeed very confusing, as pointed out by another reviewer. For example, there are chapters that almost exclusively deal with the competition policy per branch (e.g. collusion and abuse of dominance), whereas others deal with the notion of cartels and oligopolies in general. In the end you might have to read multiple chapters in order to fully grasp a specific legal concept. Moreover, the chapters do not seem to be ordered in a logical manner, so you actually have to take a good look at the table of contents.

What disappointed me the most is that the book has no chapter on state aid. Instead, the chapter is provided electronically (PDF) via the Online Resource Centre. It took me a while to discover this. Frankly, I find this unacceptable. When I purchase a book, I expect it to comprise all the relevant chapters so that I do not have to rely on my computer or have to print it out myself.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The quality of the chapters is very uneven. The one on intellectual property rights is excellent; the rest of the book is confusing and contains loads of unstructured information.
This book is of no use for practitioners or students alike.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Probably the most comprehensive and in-depth treatment of EC competition law on the market. Very good mixture of text, case extracts (not too long) and journal articles. Unlike some casebooks which only quote paragraphs from the judgment without commentary - a summary of the facts and the judgment is also provided together with excellent critique and opinions from journal articles (so it's a true text and materials book).

Compared to Whish (a popular book on this subject), this book contains more detailed analysis of the caselaw (which undoubtely forms an important part of EC competition law). Also provides a better historical background and highlight of economic concepts underlying the legal principles. But given its depth, this book can be frustrating to read as a single chapter can span over a hundred pages. So not the book you would want if you just want a quick introduction to the subject or short summaries of EC case-law and guidelines/notices (Whish much better for these purposes). But this is the book to get if you really want a good understanding of EC competition law.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By SD on 27 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book helped me a lot while studying for my exam! Theory is well structured and the cases are very well explained, this gives you a very good introduction to all you need to know about EU Competition law.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is an absolute beast and granted there is such an abundance of information it can be quite daunting and diffuclt to navigate however this is so comprehensive and in depth that it is ideal for any competition law student looking to write a good essay though granted it would be a great challenge to use it as a revision material. I used this book to help me in an essay and found it the best in the market and got a very good grade thanks to its guidance.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If you want learn about European competition law, this book probably is the best. The structure of the book includes discussion of the literature and review of the case law. Thus, you both learn the literature and case law. This 4th edition also takes into account latest changes brought about by the Treaty of Lisbon. So it is not also the best source but also upto date.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 27 April 2001
Format: Paperback
Accurate and interesting. However, this "blue/green peril" is too long and does not completely convince me; there are some areas which are not well covered and some others, where the analysis is though too long, unfocused. The good textbook on EC competition law remains to be written.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback