£6.70 + FREE UK delivery
Only 2 left in stock - order soon. Sold by Handy Stores London Ltd

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£6.70
+ FREE UK delivery
Sold by: GUR Sewing Machines
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Dylon 200g Machine Fabric Dye - Pebble Beige

3.0 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews

RRP: £8.05
Price: £6.70 FREE UK delivery.
You Save: £1.35 (17%)
Only 2 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by Handy Stores London Ltd.
19 new from £4.93
  • Easy way to update your colours
  • Strong permanent colours
  • Suitable for use on most natural fabrics

There is a newer model of this item:

£6.70 FREE UK delivery. Only 2 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by Handy Stores London Ltd.

Frequently bought together

  • Dylon 200g Machine Fabric Dye - Pebble Beige
  • +
  • DP Dye Salt - 500g
Total price: £8.74
Buy the selected items together

Product information

Technical Details
Brand Dylon
Model NumberDMD20010
ColourBeige
Item Weight222 g
Product Dimensions6.5 x 5 x 10.2 cm
  
Additional Information
ASINB000TAORGE
Best Sellers Rank 150,710 in Kitchen & Home (See top 100)
Shipping Weight222 g
Delivery Destinations:Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
Date First Available8 July 2007
  
 

Product description

Product Description

Change or renew the colour of your clothes and soft furnishings with this easy to use machine fabric dye, that won't wash out. For use in automatic front loading machines only. Suitable fabrics: cotton, linen, viscose and polyester/cotton mixes. Lighter shades on polyester mixes because pure synthetics do not pick up the dye. Not suitable for wool, silk, polyester, acrylic, nylon and other synthetic fibres or fabric with special finishes e.g. 'dry clean' only. One pack will dye up to 600g /1lb dry weight fabric. Dyeing larger amounts (up to 1200g) will give a lighter colour. Final colour depends on the original fabric colour e.g. sunflower dye on red fabric will give orange.

Box Contains

1 x 200g machine fabric dye

What do customers buy after viewing this item?


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
OK, this is not beige. It is not the colour that is shown on the packet (few of them are, though). But if you think of it as 'honey' or 'clotted cream' you may well be as delighted as I was.I was so pleased (though a bit surprised!) at the way the colour appeared, that I am about to dye a second batch of jeans etc in it. Some of the rude words used by other viewers to describe the colour are mainly the result, imho, simply of having their expectations thwarted. I admit I also had an issue at first with patchiness, but then I realised that in fact I had used the wrong washing programme, not the cotton programme as per instructions, but the synthetics one. In spite of this, when I complained (before I realised my mistake) Dylon at once sent me another packet of 'beige' and also a packet of the stuff for taking the colour out. My second try was perfect. So now I am onto my third. . . .
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I worked in an art and craft supplies shop for ten years and often had to explain to customers how to dye clothes using this and similar products. After trying it out myself for the first time recently, I found it works just as well as I thought it did.

There are several potential pitfalls. Reading the manual is the key, but it doesn't cover all eventualities or might not be too obvious on some points. Some additional information and contenders for errors that I encountered through my ten years of selling this product are as follows:

1) Using salt substitute instead of the real thing. Yes, this might seem obvious to most, but not to all. What is needed is pure cooking salt (100% NaCl - Sodium Chloride). Finely ground dissolves better in water than coarse, but under no circumstance use any low-sodium salt substitute or anything that has been augmented with things like iodine - those things are fit for human consumption, but will make your dyeing come out all wrong.

2) Even if what you dye is brand new - in fact, it is even more important if it is new - wash it properly first. New clothes in the shop are frequently inserted with agents to keep them looking nice and neat in the shop, sometimes with light water repellents, and it is essential that these things be washed out before attempting to dye. If the clothes are brand new, I'd even recommend doing it twice just to be sure.

3) Any fabrics that are waxed, waterproofed or fireproofed will not dye properly unless all of those active substances are washed out completely (see point 2). If you're unsure if there is any treatment left in the garment, at least for waterproofing, let a drop of water drip on it. If it immediately soaks in, you're good to dye.
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
Okay - so there are a couple of points to make here:
1) The colour - I can see why previous posters have said it's nicotine yellow, but actually it's on my colour chart (having had my colours done at House of Colour), so that wasn't a problem - however, it isn't pebble colour (which might make you think of pebble/stone). On cotton it came out as old gold (autumn colour no. 24) and on a cotton/polyster blend it was beige (no. 16). Image 1 shows the colour (as it came out on white jeans) with the colour indicated on the packaging.
2) I would have been happy with either of these, however, and this is the real problem - my clothes suffered with 'spotting' (image 2)- the little spots of colour (usually red/pink etc) that come when fabric comes into contact with the dye powder (even though I had completely covered it with salt). I was very disappointed, having previously and extremely successfully used rosewood, terracotta and dark brown. The only conclusion I can draw is that when you are dyeing things a lighter colour, there is more chance of spotting showing through. I will try re doing the jeans in dark - but with white stitching, and going to need lots of dark felt tips!!
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
OK
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
The dye itself took very readily on the cotton bath mat which I was changing from off-white to pebble beige. The process was easy using the washing machine method described. The resulting colour was more of a khaki or mustard colour rather than beige.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
A Dylon Pebble Beige, how we love you (Not!). Feel free to ignore previous reviewers advice, as I did, and you too can enjoy the following experience. Take your white cotton jeans, add salt as instructed and pre dissolved pebble beige dye (pre mixing in a litre of hot water does negate the blue/red spot problem), close washing machine, set going and lie back to dream of your newly dyed beige jeans which will not only wow your friends but allow you to blend in with your gravel driveway.
1 1/2 hours later, return to the washing machine and gaze with awe and wonder on said jeans. White no more! Now a magnificent shade of toad slime yellow, or snot yellow or indeed post pizza vomit yellow (without spots). Wow your friends? Possibly if you wear them on Halloween as a joke. Blend with the gravel driveway? Yes in the same way that a neon flashing sign blends with a grey granite building on a wet drizzle day.
Follow up actions: Considering if I should dye a jacket the same colour to get the full ensemble effect...could be useful when enemies come a calling.
3 Comments 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with related products. See and discover other items: furnishing fabric, viscose fabric

Look for similar items by category