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Dvorák: Cello Concerto, Tchaikovsky: Rococo Variations

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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£10.69 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Orchestra: Boston Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: Seiji Ozawa
  • Composer: Antonín Dvorák
  • Audio CD (16 Sept. 2002)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Teldec
  • ASIN: B00006I4BA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 649,318 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Dvorák : Cello Concerto in B minor Op.104 : I Allegro
  2. Dvorák : Cello Concerto in B minor Op.104 : II Adagio ma non troppo
  3. Dvorák : Cello Concerto in B minor Op.104 : III Finale - Allegro moderato
  4. Tchaikovsky : Variations on a Rococo theme Op.33

Product Description

ROSTROPOVICH OZAWA

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This performance was listed as the definitive one by ClassicsToday. I disagree. If you compare this recording (DDD) with the (ADD) recording by Karajan and Rostropovich with the BPO there is no comparsion. The Karajan/ Rostropovich BPO version is still the definitive version. The ADD transfer in no way alters the glorious beauty of the performance and this Boston Symphony orchestra version with Osawa offers nothing beyond the Karajan version, but rather something decidedly inferior. In fact although Rostropovich plays brilliantly on both recordings he reaches something of greater sublimeness with the BPO under Karajan. The playing here on this CD of the Boston Symphony seems blocked by an oppressive overhanging cloud, blocking brilliance and expressiveness; and the indivudual players of the BSO are in the case of this performance not at the level of the BPO players in any way. The BPO is absolutely glorious, especially the winds and strings. The performance on the Karajan version with the BPO is a magnificent ensemble whole - a symbiotic union of the orchestra, the conductor and the soloist, each reaching a magnificent zenith of beauty. So whereas the playing of Rostropovich is similar on both recordings, it's the BPO under Karajan that makes that performance light years distant from this one. Therefore the Karajan version is still the reference recording of this magnicient work. You don't need this version, although the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations are rather well done on this recording.Dvorák: Cello Concerto / Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five stars isn't enough 25 Oct. 2007
By T. Mayhew - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It just doesn't get any better. Dvorak is the best composer, this his greatest work (standing alongside, if not above, the 9th symphony, and the American string quartet), and the partnership of Ozawa and Rostropovich the finest reading this work has ever received on record. The Boston Symphony is top class, weaving a harmonic thread through the entire concerto that matches Rostropovich well. Rostropovich with the Berliner Phil is musically excellent, but the recording quality is digitally remastered, not quite as true as this original digital version. Also Ozawa and the BSO favor a more minimalist, controlled interpretation which both more musically satisfying and more revealing of the talent and vision of Rostropovich himself.
As far as the music itself, there are so many different interpretations of the Dvorak (Du Pre, 2nd best w/ Sergiu Celibidache, Mork, Piatigorsky). It is a symphony for orchestra and cello, and each movement contains so many different moods, tempos, and rhythms that it requires a huge diversity of musical expression, where Rostropovich is peerless. He always makes a big heavy sound, though his phrasing and expression produce a lullaby-like effect in the adagio, and the finale is jubilant, powerful and precise.
Now for the recording quality. Perhaps due to his big sound, Rostropovich creates exceptional balance with the orchestra. In the remastered version w/ Karajan the the Berliner Phil, the digital editing removes Rostropovich from the spere of the orchestra somewhat, makes him more glossy. Not so with this one. Rostropovich pops right out of the orchestra, and then seamlessly blends back in. The balance is subtle and satisfying.
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