Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dune: House Harkonnen (Prelude to Dune) Hardcover – 1 Nov 2000

4.0 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£23.50 £0.02
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.20
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 603 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553110721
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553110722
  • Product Dimensions: 24.3 x 16.5 x 4.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 855,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Don't even think about reading House Harkonnen without reading its predecessor Prelude to Dune: House Atreides; anyone who does so risks sinking in the sands between Frank Herbert's original Dune and this new prequel trilogy by Herbert's son, Brian, and Kevin J. Anderson. The purist argument that had Herbert wanted to go backwards he would have done so is, at least in part, negated by the sheer narrative verve, and by the fact that Anderson and Brian Herbert manage to pull some genuine surprises out of this long-running space-opera. House Harkonnen is a massive book, and there are places where it becomes plot heavy, but in following the story of Duke Leto Atreides and the conflicts with House Harkonnen, the authors succeed in spinning a gripping adventure while going off in some unexpected directions. Anderson, who has written many successful Star Wars novels, has noted his particular admiration for The Empire Strikes Back, and his desire to emulate that film's dark take on the genre. In House Harkonnen the conflict encompasses the tragedy of nuclear war, is marked by grief and horror, vengeance and torment, and all while the complex intrigues continue to unfold.

Everything has its cost. We pay to create our future, we pay for the mistakes of the past. We pay for every change we make--and we pay just as dearly if we refuse to change.
Ultimately this is the theme of a compelling game of consequences, choices and responsibility, a study of Leto's growth into power and the price of politics and love. --Gary S. Dalkin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Raves for the return of Dune:
"ÝFans¨ rejoice in this chance to return to one of science fiction's most appealing futures."
-- "The New York Times Book Review"
"ÝThe authors¨ have brought this classic saga back to an exciting and dynamic life."
-- "The Denver Post"

Don't miss the thrilling first novel in Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's prequel to the Dune saga:
Dune: House Atreides
Available now from Bantam Spectra Books
And coming soon in hardcover:
Dune: House Corrino


Raves for the return of Dune:
"[Fans] rejoice in this chance to return to one of science fiction's most appealing futures."
-- "The New York Times Book Review"
"[The authors] have brought this classic saga back to an exciting and dynamic life."
-- "The Denver Post"

Don't miss the thrilling first novel in Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's prequel to the Dune saga:
Dune: House Atreides
Available now from Bantam Spectra Books
And coming soon in hardcover:
Dune: House Corrino


Raves for the return of Dune

"[Fans] rejoice in this chance to return to one of science fiction's most appealing futures."
-- "The New York Times Book Review"

"[The authors] have brought this classic saga back to an exciting and dynamic life."
-- "The Denver Post"


Don't miss the thrilling first novel in Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's prequel to the Dune saga:

Dune: House Atreides

Available now from Bantam Spectra Books
And coming soon in hardcover:

Dune: House Corrino
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Don't expect anything as good as the original Dune series books here, however, it is still a great trip back to the Dune fantasy and it's a worthy sequel to House Atreides. A must buy for any Dune fan who enjoyed House Atreides.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
With 626 pages in large format softback edition, it is a formidable book, and a bit daunting, but once you get past the first few pages it is difficult to put down. Again the usual multi-plot storyline, again the intense detail which was the highlight of the original Dune, this is not a book for the faint-hearted. The book draws much of the character descriptions, I think, from the film Dune, with the fat Baron Harkonnen floating around in his suspensor belt a prime candidate. House Harkonnen has always been portrayed as 'the baddies' in the Dune series - read this and you will understand why. Some of the dirty deeds done by Rabban are staggering, and you wonder how much worse he can get. You don't have to wait long - he must rate as one of the most evil creatures alive - Charles Manson and Hannibal Lecter are nice people by comparison. As with the previous Prelude, House Atreides, I think that the last 5% of the book is hurried, as if the authors were told to 'get a move on, it's going to be too big to fit inside the book cover'. That aside, this is an excellent book, and I can't wait to read House Corrino due out this year.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio Cassette
House Harkonnen follows on, surprisingly enough from House Atredies. Both books carry on almost continuously so this review can just as easily be given to the first by Frank Herberts son. The writing style is nice and consistent with the original series, which was, in my view, the greatest set of books i have ever had the pleasure of reading. The story lines are damned good, adding much more depth to the history of Dune and how Paul came to be as he was. But this is where it has recieved some critisism, some people say it can't be that good as you know where everything's going - you know who lives and who dies because of peoples positions in Dune. But the fact of the matter is that Brian Herbert keeps the plot interesting and twisting, while adding more depth to the Universe. - This is a damned good book. get the whole Dune series, but do start with the original, because these are written as though you've read the originals.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 23 April 2001
Format: Audio Cassette
this book is amazing, it's not the same as the original, it's like comparing an apple with an orange. both these fruits are very delecious
i cannot wait for the other dune books come out, the ones that will be released in the furure are
1. dune - house corrino - the end of the prequels
2. dune 7 (no title yet, it's the grand finale to the dune series)
(the next three is the THE BUTLERIAN JIHAD series, it will detail the saga of the century-long conflict, as well as the original breach that formed the deadly feud between House Atreides and House Harkonnen. The story will include Tio Holtzman's development of foldspace and shield technology, how House Corrino establishes the Imperium, how the Zensunni Wanderers (fremen) escape slavery and flee to the desert world of Arrakis. Readers will also see the seeds of DUNE's famous Great Schools of the Mentats, the Bene Gesserit, the Suk Doctors, and the Swordmasters.
3.THE BUTLERIAN JIHAD
4.THE MACHINE CRUSADE
5.THE BATTLE OF CORRIN.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Another excellent instalment in the Dune saga.
I was as sceptical as anyone when I heard about the prelude books, but I have nothing but praise for the authors and their achievement.
Brian and Kevin and have managed to perfectly capture the essence of relatively minor characters from the original series and flesh them out into fully fledged people with fascinating stories, while keeping within the constraints Frank Herbert had set out (ie. because we already know what will happen in the "future").
There are a few historical inconsistencies, but none that detract from your enjoyment of the book (though the number of typos in both this and House Atreides is bemusing! Getting the editing/reviewing sorted out, guys).
All in all, if you enjoyed Dune, and want to see more of old favourites like Duncan, Gurney, Jessica and Baron Harkonnen, while seeing characters who didn't feature much in the original series (such as Count Fenring and Duke Leto) developed, this is a must read.
Well done. I can hardly wait for House Corrino........
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As many people have said, these prequels, sequels and other attempts by Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson to make a cheap living off Frank Herbert's work are incredibly poor. To be honest, I think if it had been anybody else that had written them, they would probably never have been published. They're that bad. The characters could be out of a poor B movie, they lack depth so badly, the action scenes are luke warm at best and the plot is just appalling. Even the evil Harkonnens are just watered down goons, with about about as much malice as the baddies in some soap opera show. It feels as if Brian and Kevin only read the blurbs on the back of Brian's dad's books and decided, after a few beers, to write some sequels, while watching the superbowl and eating pop-corn.

My tip: In all honesty, use your imagination to complete the Dune series. Don't let these books spoil it for you.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback