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Dreaming Of Jupiter Paperback – 15 Nov 2007

4.1 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Dreaming Of Jupiter
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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere (15 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847441815
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847441812
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,917,449 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Gloriously luminescent, but always self-deprecating. Simon's physical powers are diminishing, but his writing just gets better. The wonderful portraits of the people he encounters, often redolent of Bruce Chatwin, are sometimes so enticing that, were this a movie, you'd swear they were a plant for later on (OBSERVER)

This book has barely left my side in the past few days. It is, by turns, sad, funny and immensely uplifting (TELEGRAPH)

A trip of dreams - and Ted Simon has done it twice . . . a terrific read (RTE GUIDE)

He was on the road for three years, and his new book, Dreaming of Jupiter, is a compelling account of the adventures en route, including breaking a leg in the middle of a vast plain in Ethiopia; a reunion with a camel rider he'd met 25 years before in Eg (SAGA MAGAZINE)

Book Description

* The sequel to the classic travel book JUPITER'S TRAVELS, which sold over half a million copies and was the inspiration for the LONG WAY ROUND trip

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As with the original Jupiters Travels extremely well written,this extraordinary book is imaginative, thought provoking and inspiring to any reader not just lonely adventure bikers. Reading the two books gives a great comparison of the developing world and reflects on the population expansion issues of our greedy western civilisation whilst from a biker angle reads with continual interest ..Well recommended ..you need never have worn leathers, dropped a bike or stripped an engine to enjoy! but you will need to have been in love at least once in your life to understand some of the deeper moments.
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Format: Paperback
Ted Simon is a very remarkable man and, in his 70's, to undertake a 59,000 mile motorcycle journey visiting 47 countries is little short of astonishing.
And he did all this without back up teams of people to support him or arrange his visas or anything else, but on his own.
However, it is a very different book to Jupiter's Travels.
I think this is possibly explained by Ted himself in chapter 27 -'It seemed to me impossible to say anything upbeat and optimistic about the changes I had seen'.
Whilst Jupiter's Travels was full of optimism - indeed Ted describes himself seeing 'in the world of the seventies a kind of innocence' - the world of the new millenium is rather less so. Vastly improved communication has destroyed the innocence. The immolation of the twin towers, and America's reaction to it, has created a very different world.
So Dreaming of Jupiter is not an optimistic book, but may well give you much food for thought.
The good news is that Ted is an optimist himself, because only an optimist could have undertaken this journey, not once, but twice.
Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
I nearly put this book down in the first 80 pages-Ted Simons finds anti-climax at every corner-people he met in the 70s have gone-the world seems full of litter and is now built up where once was paradise. However I began to realise that his honesty is part of the author's strength . He equally describes the beauty of Africa-the thrill of the high Andes , the stunning Australian outback and the kindness of strangers.We are left with an impression that it is still a wonderful world out there but it needs protecting.When I look back at Jupiter's travels he also describes misery filth and poverty amongst beauty .Why did that not affect me in the same way when I first read it? It probably did .We look back at Jupiter's travels through rose tinted glasses and I'm sure we will do the same with this book.It is a classic which took me from my hammock in the garden to the wild high places of the world and gently back again-Well worth reading
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great follow up from Teds first motorcycle adventure Jupiters Travels. An epic feat of older man and newer machine. Ted Simon seems to be indestructible and re-visits the past at a time when most of us would be choosing a headstone. His writing style changes a little and if anything is better, making it an obsorbing easy to read book. Re-tracing our past can be a mixed roller coaster of emotions and indeed this fact is revealed here. Things are rarely what they used to be but mostly the changes appear for the better.
Once again Ted gives only snippets of his life outside the trip keeping our curiosity raw.a truly original thinker and writer with strong humanitarian values. Can we have an auto- biography Ted? Other books are in my previous reviews and I thoroughly recommend the following. The Old GloryThe Riddle of the Sands
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Format: Paperback
Let me say - and Ted, if you are reading this; please remember - I loved your first Motorcycling book 'Jupiter's Travels'.
I recommended it to many people, (my wife included) who loved it, and I have promoted that book to many other people who have also enjoyed it.
So, after enjoying reading the first book so much I was really excited about buying 'Draming of Jupiter' and reading it.

Big mistake. But, let me tell you why..

For those with a short attention span, who want a quick answer to `should I buy this book?' the answer is:
"only if you enjoy listening to the irritating moaning of a grumpy old Englishman on a repeat journey around the world to see if he is as important and famous as he thinks he might be, only to find out the answer is no".

To expand slightly, Ted brings us all on a literary ride where he visits all the places he went to 30 years or so ago and (in summary) reports that everything is essentially worse off and (surprise, surprise) is not as good as it was `back in his day', as judged from the lofty heights of the typical English post-colonial in-built superiority that views any country or person that isn't English with (mostly unconscious and well-meaning) condescension, ridicule and light pity. All the while attempting to cover this with a thin veil of being a `man of the world' and `curious and open to all cultures' while (almost without fail) criticising or disapproving of each one he encounters. It's a non-stop litany of whinges. He attempts all along to mask his innate grumpy-old-man nature with occasional self-deprecation and modesty but sadly it never quite covers the painful reality of the all-too-apparent subtext.
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