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Down In The Groove (Remastered)
 
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Down In The Groove (Remastered)

14 Oct. 2013 | Format: MP3

£0.00
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£5.99 to buy (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
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3:09
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2:14
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2:29
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5:09
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2:52
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3:30
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3:05
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2:55
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3:38
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2:58
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Oct. 2013
  • Release Date: 14 Oct. 2013
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 31:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00FHO645Y
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 79,750 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
As a part of Bob's canon, this is not perceived as major, and, to use a cliche, should not be one of the first albums of his you buy - Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61, Blonde on Blonde, Blood On The Tracks would all be good choices. However, for the established Bob fan, this album is by no means abysmal.
Shenandoah, a traditional song which older Bob fans may well have heard from other sources during the folk days of the sixties, is simply awesome - Bob's voice echoes like it would on Good As I've Been To You and World Gone Wrong, and gives an outstandingly poignant rendition. The music is a brilliant adaption of a simple folk melody to an electric sensibility; the rhythm section is pulsating, seething with controlled energy. The song is a landmark in Bob's history, both on its own and as a pointer to his work from the middle '90s onwards, and should not be missed.
Shenandoah is, however, also notable in its initially stark contrast to the rest of the album. The album is essentially a series of covers, many of them rock n' roll standards, or at least rock n' roll influenced. Let's Stick Together is the most famous of these songs, and has appeared in many incarnations over the years - "come on, come on, let's stick together..." - it is the song you think it is! Bob's version is reasonably listenable. When Did You Leave Heaven has a prominent drum beat that seems to emphasise the off beat whilst everyone else plays to the on beat, which gives a somewhat strange effect; if one gets over this, though, this slow song, again with a very fine vocal performance from Bob, is one of the highlights of the album in its emotional power.
These two songs pave the way for the rest of the album, other than Shenandoah; the songs are rollicking rock n' roll or powerful and slow.
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By A Customer on 22 Sept. 2003
Format: Audio CD
I brought this album at the airport before going on holiday, as being a big Dylan fan, this was one of the few 'in-between albums' I didn't have. I had brought 'World Gone Wrong' a few weeks before hand and was not impressed and expected the same kind of outcome with this album.
But I loved it!!!
I love all Bob's slow songs/ballads and his beautifully sentimental 'when did you leave heaven' and hope-filled yet apocalyptic 'death is not the end' proved to me that no-one can do this sort of thing like Bob can.
And what can i say about 'ugliest girl in the world'? Musically it is a typical 12 bar stomper, but the tongue in cheek lyrics had me in stitches which doesn't happen to me much when I listen to Bob.
I don't think Bob put a lot of thought into this album, and it was written just as a contract filler, but I listen to it knowing it is Bob running at 25%, and enjoy it for what it is. OK, The songs could have been placed a bit more thoughtfully instead of the slow-fast-slow-fast sequence, but i just program my CD player and that sorts this out.
Get it,
it is a fun album,
with a few nice surprises on it.
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By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 April 2007
Format: Audio CD
Three and a half stars, really. Judged by Dylan's own standards, this album is average but it does contain some gems that no fan should be without. The faster paced rock songs like the flowing Let's Stick Together, the humorous Ugliest Girl In The World with its RnB backing vocals and Sally are merely alright, not bad but not particularly memorable either. Eric Clapton provides some impressive guitar to Had A Dream About You Baby, whilst the track Silvio is quite buoyant and catchy in a lightweight pop way. None of these is lyrically profound but some of the slow ballads are.

These slow songs are the best by far. Most of them are melancholy and all of them are tuneful. Although it does contain some frightening, perhaps prophetic imagery, Death Is Not The End is a simple and comforting masterpiece embellished by his trademark harmonica and soulful backing vocals. Ninety Miles An Hour is powerful with haunting lyrics, the traditional Shenandoah - also with bursts of harmonica - gets a gospely treatment over a lilting beat and the album concludes on a high note with the yearning lament Rank Strangers To Me. These atmospheric songs remind me of his albums Saved, Shot Of Love and Infidels.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I only became a big fan of Dylan 2 years ago and started collecting all his music. I put Down in the Groove at the bottom of my list, as I did not really like his voice at this time. However, after listening to "When did you Leave Heaven", which I cannot stop playing, I decided I must buy this CD. I now love "Rank Stranger To Me" and "Shenandoah". 40+CDs' later, I have learned never to dismiss any of Dylan's albums , as there is always a wee "Gem" in them.
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Format: Audio CD
First of all, I prefer this as an album to Knocked Out Loaded. Considerably so.
It doesn't have a single song on it with anything like the appeal of Brownsville Girl, but as an album it stands up better. It is a basic rock and roll and folk collection; and with much looking to the skies and saying 'thank you', the worst excesses of 80's production such as horrible drum sounds and swathes of irritating synths, are largely absent. For these reasons, it is perfectly listenable throughout and mostly enjoyable.
Nevertheless, there is still something half-assed about the whole affair. Death Is Not The End is a slightly turgid Infidels reject (directly so, the band is identical), and there are two songs where Robert Hunter has written the lyrics (Ugliest Girl in the World and Silvio). Based on this evidence alone, Robert Hunter can write lyrics about as well as I could rewire a house (I couldn't and wouldn't want to try) and one wonders why he was asked*. There are some pretty good knockabout rock songs; Had A Dream About You Baby springs to mind, for instance. But it is the last three songs, all covers, that actually impress me. Dylan sounds like he really cares about the material and does a rather good job on them, especially the closer - Rank Strangers To Me. I saw him sing this live in 1997 at Wembley Arena and it was probably the one song that really brought the house down, despite it being an excellent all-round show.
One of the reasons why music tends to change subtly over time is that events in the future shape the past as much as the reverse. In 1988, nobody knew that Dylan was less than a year and a ride to New Orleans away from a full critical revival.
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