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The Dorito Effect: The Surprising New Truth about Food and Flavor Hardcover – 5 May 2015

4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (5 May 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1476724210
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476724218
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 717,994 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"Mark Schatzker's book comes at a time when healthful eating and sustainability are increasingly on everyone's minds. "The Dorito Effect" is a quick, engaging read that examines the essential role that flavor plays in the way we eat today. As a chef, I know that people want to eat delicious food, but Schatzker goes further and investigates how we engage with flavor to address the growing health crisis."--Daniel Boulud, Chef/Owner, The Dinex Group

About the Author

Mark Schatzker is an award-winning writer based in Toronto. He is a radio columnist for the Canadian Broadcast Corporation and a frequent contributor to the Globe and Mail, Condé Nast Traveler, and Bloomberg Pursuits. He is the author of The Dorito Effect: The Surprising New Truth About Food and Flavor and Steak: One Man’s Search for the World’s Tastiest Piece of Beef. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The Dorito effect is that the more raw food we produce, the more bland and nutritionally worthless it becomes, the more flavors we must add to make it interesting and the more varieties we have to offer because it so unappealing. Fruit, vegetables, chicken, beef – all taste nothing like they used to and mainly taste like nothing. So we add chipotle and soy, mustard and curry, salt and pepper. And aromas. And “natural flavorings”. We consume five times as much spice as we did after the first world war, when the first stats appeared. The first third of the book is all about faking flavors (with astonishing precision and success) to make food industrially.

The flavorings industry is a giant you never heard of. They are not household brands (except for McCormick) but sell billions in flavorings to cover the fact that mass produced and industrially processed food has no taste. Food is becoming more like cigarettes, Schatzker says. All foods taste different, but underneath, they’re all processed dull, flat and nutritionless, if not downright harmful. Humans now eat like livestock.

The invention of gas chromatography has taken all the magic out of taste and aroma. We now have the ability to create or recreate pretty much any gustatory sensation possible, faking our way to variety, where spectacular taste once ruled. Fruits and vegetables are much blander, because we breed the goodness out when we breed for volume. Same with beef, chicken and pork; they are much fatter and blander than they used to be, and all require vast quantities of coatings, sauces and spices to make up for their lack of taste.

The middle third of the book is research into “nutritional wisdom”; plants and animals instinctively know what they need.
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Format: Hardcover
I knew that food companies were using scientists to manipulate fats, sugars, and salt to get us addicted, I just didn't realize how far this went until reading this book. The author provides a great deal of background information on how we got to this point where flavour is now something that has to be manufactured and added since factory food has become so bland. Information includes the way all foods have been manipulated for quantity production rather than quality and this includes meats. Why in the world would McCormick need to develop flavourings that make meat taste like meat? If poultry and beef producers were concerned with bringing to our tables product that was wholesome rather than fast food (as in chickens or beef animals being juiced (hormones and all manner of chemicals) up to grow at four times the natural rate) we wouldn't need chemicals to make the food taste real.

It's insanity to keep buying junk that needs chemicals to make it taste good. Support your local farmers who provide organic produce and ignore the mega corporations that focus on profit rather than quality.
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Format: Hardcover
I knew that food companies were using scientists to manipulate fats, sugars, and salt to get us addicted, I just didn't realize how far this went until reading this book. The author provides a great deal of background information on how we got to this point where flavour is now something that has to be manufactured and added since factory food has become so bland. Information includes the way all foods have been manipulated for quantity production rather than quality and this includes meats. Why in the world would McCormick need to develop flavourings that make meat taste like meat? If poultry and beef producers were concerned with bringing to our tables product that was wholesome rather than fast food (as in chickens or beef animals being juiced (hormones and all manner of chemicals) up to grow at four times the natural rate) we wouldn't need chemicals to make the food taste real.

It's insanity to keep buying junk that needs chemicals to make it taste good. Support your local farmers who provide organic produce and ignore the mega corporations that focus on profit rather than quality.
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